Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing

Editor
| Universität Stuttgart
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027230348 (Eur) | EUR 120.00
ISBN 9781556193835 (USA) | USD 180.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027282002 | EUR 120.00 | USD 180.00
 
Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing is entirely devoted to the topic of Lexical Functions, which have been introduced in the framework of the Meaning-Text Theory (MTT) as a means for describing restricted lexical co-occurrence and derivational relations. It provides detailed background information, comparative studies of other known proposals for the representation of relations covered by Lexical Functions, as well as a selection of most important works done on and with Lexical Functions in lexicography and computational linguistics. This volume provides excellent course material while it also reports on the state-of-the-art in the field.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 31]  1996.  xx, 355 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Abbreviations and Notations
xvii
Introduction
1
1 On lf Relations
3
1.1 Paradigmatic lf Relations
3
1.2 Syntagmatic lf Relations
12
2 Lexical Functions in the Overall Framework of mtt
23
3 Outline of the Volume
25
Lexical Functions
37
1 Preliminary Remarks
37
2 On the Concept of Lexical Function
39
3 Simple Standard Lexical Functions
45
3.1 Classification of Simple Standard lfs
46
3.2 List of Simple Standard lfs
46
4 Special Phenomena Related to Lexical Functions
72
4.1 Complex lfs
73
4.2 Configurations of lfs
74
4.3 Fused Elements of Values of lfs
74
5 Presentation of the Values of lfs in Lexical Entries
74
5.1 Elements of the Value f(L) as Subentries in L's Entry
75
5.2 Generalizing over the Values of lfs
76
6 Linguistic Nature of Lexical Functions
79
6.1 Semantic Aspect of lfs
80
6.2 Phraseological Aspect of lfs
86
6.3 LFs in Linguistic Representations
88
6.4 Universality of lfs
89
6.5 New Simple Standard lfs?
90
7 Lexical Functions in Computer Applications
91
7.1 Lfs and Lexical Choices
92
7.2 Lfs and Communicative Structure
94
7.3 Lfs and Text Cohesion
95
Lexical Functions Across Languages
103
1 Introduction
103
2 Lexical Functions Are a Heuristic Tool
104
3 Why Do Lexical Functions Work?
107
Using Lexical Functions for the Extraction of Collocations from Dictionaries and Corpora
115
1 Introduction
115
2 Automatic Exploration of Language Resources
117
2.1 Analysis of Dictionary Articles
117
2.2 Analysis of Text Corpora
118
2.3 Collocation Discovery in Linguistic Resources: Dictionaries vs. Corpora
121
3 Exploiting lf Definitions for Discovery Procedures
122
3.1 Part of speech Combinations in Syntagmatic lfs
123
3.2 Using the Definitions of Operi, Funci, and Laborij for Corpus Exploration
125
3.3 Exploiting Correlations between Semantic and Collocational Properties for Corpus Exploration Purposes
129
4 Extracting Collocations from Dictionaries
133
4.1 Problems of the Representation of Collocations in Dictionaries
134
4.2 An Analysis of a Few Collocationally Rich Dictionaries
135
4.3 Collocation Extraction from Definition Dictionaries
137
4.4 Augmenting Lexical Descriptions with Information from Text Corpora
140
5 Summary
144
A Classification and Description of Lexical Functions for the Analysis of their Combinations
147
1 Introduction
147
2 Classification of Lexical Functions
148
2.1 Brief Review of Previous Classifications of lfs
148
2.2 A New Classification of lfs
151
2.3 Justification of Our Classification
157
3 Descriptive Parameters
158
3.1 Semantic Parameters
158
3.2 Syntactic Categories
159
4 Combinations of Lexical Functions
160
4.1 Complex lfs
160
4.2 Compound lfs
161
4.3 LF Configurations
162
4.4 Internal Syntax of lf Combinations
162
5 Conclusion
164
A Case of Aspectual Polysemy, with Implications for Lexical Functions
169
1 Introduction
169
2 Telic and Atelic Readings
170
3 Atelic Perfectives in Russian
174
4 Aspectual Functions of Oper1 in English
177
5 Lexical Functions and Grammatical Meanings
178
On Dictionary Entries for Support Verbs
181
1 Focussing on the Problem
181
2 Examples from the tks and the Deribas Glossary
183
2.1 Tks
183
2.2 Deribas Glossary
186
3 Semantic Links of Operi-Verbs
187
3.1 Vesti
187
3.2 Provodit′/Provesti
189
3.3 Proizvodit′/Proizvesti
190
3.4 Support Verb Semantics: Step 1
190
4 Semantic Groups of Nouns in Oper-Collocations
192
4.1 Vesti
192
4.2 Provodit′/Provesti
193
4.3 Proizvodit′/Proizvesti
197
4.4 Support Verb Semantics: Step 2
198
5 Contextual Factors for the Choice of Support Verbs
199
5.1 Context Expressed by Adverbials of Time
199
5.2 Context Expressed by Adverbials of Manner and Instrument
200
6 Lexical Entries for the Support Verb vesti in the ecd Format
201
7 Concluding Remarks
203
Lexical Functions and Lexical Inheritance for Emotion Lexemes in German
209
1 Introduction
209
1.1 The Statement of the Problem
209
1.2 The Data
211
1.3 The Methodology
212
1.4 The Structure of the Paper
213
2 Semantic and Syntactic Information in the ECD
214
2.1 Semantic Zone
214
2.2 Syntactic Zone
215
3 Emotion Lexemes in German
215
3.1 Semantics of Emotion Lexemes in German
216
3.2 Government Patterns of Emotion Lexemes in German
223
3.3 Restricted Lexical Co-occurrence of Emotion Lexemes in German
225
4 Towards a More Efficient Representation of Lexicographic Information
228
4.1 Discussion of Lexical Co-occurrence/Meaning Correlations
228
4.2 Implementing Syntactic Inheritance in an ecd
231
4.3 Implementing Lexical Inheritance Principle in an ecd
233
4.4 Full vs. Compressed Lexical Entries: angst, hoffnung, wut
234
4.5 The Lexical Entry of gefühl: the Generic Lexeme of the Semantic Field of Emotions
238
5 Conclusions
241
Some Procedural Problems in the Implementation of Lexical Functions for Text Generation
279
1 Introduction
279
2 Use of Lexical Functions in the lfs/rts Systems
281
3 General Principles behind the Implementation of Lexical Functions
282
4 Levels of Transition Where Lexical Functions Are Used
284
4.1 SemR ⇒ DSyntR Transition
284
4.2 DSyntR ⇒ SSyntR Transition
286
5 Encoding the Values of Lexical Functions in the Lexicon
288
6 Implementation of Lexical Function Paraphrasing
289
7 Lf Paraphrasing Rules Used in the lfs/rts Systems
291
7.1 Six cases of RedSemR ⇒ DSyntR Transition Rules Using lfs
291
7.2 Criteria for Choosing Among Transition Rules
296
8 Conclusion
296
Generating Cohesive Text Using Lexical Functions
299
1 Introduction
299
2 The Generation Process
300
3 The Choice of Referring Expressions
302
4 Generating Appropriate Collocations
304
5 The Lexical Database
306
6 Summary
306
ruslo
307
1 Introduction: Automatic System for Russian Derivation
307
2 Linguistic Information in ruslo
309
2.1 Formal Information
309
2.2 Semantic Information
311
3 Material for Further Research: Xlebnikov's Neologisms
316
Bibliography
319
Subject Index
336
Name Index
353
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2015.  In Semantics [Studies in Language Companion Series, 168], Crossref logo
No author info given
2020.  In Lexical Semantics for Terminology [Terminology and Lexicography Research and Practice, 20], Crossref logo
Alghamdi, Ayman & Eric Atwell
2017.  In Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 10596],  pp. 415 ff. Crossref logo
Avgustinova, Tania & Leonid Iomdin
2019.  In Computational and Corpus-Based Phraseology [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 11755],  pp. 15 ff. Crossref logo
Bolshakov, I.A. & A. Gelbukh
2001.  In 2001 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. e-Systems and e-Man for Cybernetics in Cyberspace (Cat.No.01CH37236),  pp. 1688 ff. Crossref logo
Calvo, Hiram & Alexander Gelbukh
2006.  In Natural Language Processing and Information Systems [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 3999],  pp. 164 ff. Crossref logo
Cortés-Rodriguez, Francisco J.
2017. Revisiting Aktionsart types for lexical classes. Review of Cognitive Linguistics 14:2  pp. 498 ff. Crossref logo
Hamel, Marie-Josée
2010. Prototype d’un dictionnaire électronique de reformulation pour apprenants avancés de français langue seconde. Recherche et pratiques pédagogiques en langues de spécialité - Cahiers de l APLIUT :Vol. XXIX N° 1  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Hamel, Marie-Josée
2012. Testing aspects of the usability of an online learner dictionary prototype: a product- and process-oriented study. Computer Assisted Language Learning 25:4  pp. 339 ff. Crossref logo
Khoo, Christopher S. G. & Jin-Cheon Na
2007. Semantic relations in information science. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology 40:1  pp. 157 ff. Crossref logo
Leacock, Claudia, Martin Chodorow, Michael Gamon & Joel Tetreault
2014. Automated Grammatical Error Detection for Language Learners, Second Edition. Synthesis Lectures on Human Language Technologies 7:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Milićević, Jasmina & Àngels Catena
2015.  In Modern Computational Models of Semantic Discovery in Natural Language [Advances in Linguistics and Communication Studies, ],  pp. 235 ff. Crossref logo
Milićević, Jasmina & Marie-Josée Hamel
2008. Un dictionnaire de reformulation pour les apprenants du français langue seconde. Revue de l'Université de Moncton  pp. 145 ff. Crossref logo
Montero‐Martínez, Silvia & Mercedes García de Quesada
2003. Terminological analysis for translation. Perspectives 11:4  pp. 293 ff. Crossref logo
Murphy, M. Lynne
2003.  In Semantic Relations and the Lexicon, Crossref logo
Wanner, Leo, Bernd Bohnet, Nadjet Bouayad-Agha, François Lareau & Daniel Nicklaß
2010. MARQUIS: GENERATION OF USER-TAILORED MULTILINGUAL AIR QUALITY BULLETINS. Applied Artificial Intelligence 24:10  pp. 914 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 august 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Terminology & Lexicography

Lexicography
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  95053207