Collocational and Idiomatic Aspects of Composite Predicates in the History of English

Editors
| University of British Columbia
| Aoyama Gakuin University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027230508 (Eur) | EUR 110.00
ISBN 9781556199332 (USA) | USD 165.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027298751 | EUR 110.00 | USD 165.00
 
The focus of this carefully selected volume concerns the existence, frequency, and form of composite/complex predicates (the “take a look” construction) in earlier periods of the English language, an area of scholarship which has been virtually neglected. The various contributions seek to understand the collocational and idiomatic aspects of these structures, as well as of related structures such as complex prepositions (e.g., “on account of”) and phrasal verbs (e.g., “look up”), in their earliest manifestations. Moreover, study of these constructions at the individual stages of English leads to diachronic questions concerning their development, raising issues pertaining to grammaticalization, lexicalization, and idiomaticization-processes which are not always clearly differentiated nor fully understood.
[Studies in Language Companion Series, 47]  1999.  xiv, 283 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
v
List of Tables
xi
Preface
xiii
Chapter 1: Introduction
Laurel J. Brinton and Minoji Akimoto
1
1.1 Introduction
1
1.2 Description of the structures studied in this volume
2
1.3 Definition of “idiom” and “collocation”
7
1.4 Problems in the diachronic development of the structures
9
1.5 Conclusion
18
Notes
19
Chapter 2: The Origin of the Composite Predicate in Old English
Minoji Akimoto and Laurel J. Brinton
21
2.1 Introduction
21
2.2 A note on previous studies
22
2.3 Problems for the study of composite predicates in Old English
22
2.4 Rivalry of verbs and the classification of collocations
23
2.5 Collocations of (ge)don and (ge)macian
24
2.6 Collocations of sellan and giefan
34
2.7 Collocations of (ge)niman and tacan
38
2.8 Collocations of habban
42
2.9 Discussion
44
2.10 Conclusion
54
Notes
54
Texts
56
Chapter 3: Composite Predicates in Middle English
Meiko Matsumoto
59
3.1 Introduction
59
3.2 Definition of a CP
60
3.3 Form of the CP in ME
61
3.4 Verbs taking the same agentive object
64
3.5 CPs and corresponding simple verbs
77
3.6 Modification of CPs
83
3.7 Passivization
88
3.8 Figurative meaning
89
3.9 Conclusion
92
Notes
93
Texts
95
Chapter 4: Composite Predicates and Phrasal Verbs in The Paston Letters
Harumi Tanabe
97
4.1 Introduction
97
4.2 Composite predicates in The Paston Letters
99
4.3 Composite predicates versus simple verbs
108
4.4 Idiomatization
113
4.5 Phrasal verbs in The Paston Letters
123
4.6 Conclusion
129
Notes
131
Texts
132
Chapter 5: Verbal Phrases and Phrasal Verbs in Early Modern English
Risto Hiltunen
133
5.1 Introduction
133
5.2 Data and sampling method
134
5.3 Verbal phrases
136
5.4 Phrasal verbs
158
5.5 Conclusion
162
Appendix: The Corpus
163
Notes
165
Chapter 6: Collocational and Idiomatic Aspects of Verbs in Early Modern English
Merja Kytö
167
6.1 Aims and approach
167
6.2 The properties and development of the verb + deverbal noun constructions
168
6.3 The selectional criteria adopted
169
6.4 The data: an overall view of the types and tokens
170
6.5 Isomorphic and non-isomorphic forms
174
6.6 Extralinguistic patterning
175
6.7 Collocational and idiomatic characteristics of the uses
179
6.8 Simple verb vs. verb + noun construction: USE vs. MAKE/HAVE USE and CARE vs. TAKE/HAVE CARE
197
6.9 Conclusion
199
Appendix: The verb + noun constructions excerpted from the Early Modern English section of the Helsinki Corpus included in this study
200
Notes
206
Chapter 7: Collocations and Idioms in Late Modern English
Minoji Akimoto
207
7.1 Introduction
207
7.2 Verbo-nominal structures
208
7.3 Preposition + NP + prepositional phrases
216
7.4 Phrasal verbs
221
7.5 How does idiomatization take place?
225
7.6 Concluding remarks
235
Notes
235
Texts
236
Chapter 8: A Historical Overview of Complex Predicate Types
Elizabeth Closs Traugott
239
8.1 Introduction
239
8.2 Stability in the structure of complex predicates
240
8.3 Changes in the set of strings defined as complex predicates
241
8.4 Changes in degree of compositionality
247
8.5 Complex predicates, lexicalization, and idiomatization
257
8.6 Summary
259
Notes
260
References for the Volume
261
Subject Index
275
Name Index
281
List of Tables
Table 2.1: Composite predicates with simplex counterparts in Old English
44
Table 4.1: Frequencies of composite predicates in The Paston Letters
101
Table 4.2: Frequencies of composite predicates by decades
101
Table 4.3: Nominal modifiers of composite predicates
114
Table 4.4: Nouns with zero-article or a/an
117
Table 4.5: Verbal substitution in composite predicates
121
Table 4.6: Prepositions occurring with composite predicates
122
Table 4.7: Frequency of phrasal verbs according to particles
123
Table 5.1: The distribution of the patterns according to types
144
Table 5.2: The distribution of the patterns according to tokens
145
Table 5.3: Verbal phrases containing suffixed and etymologically related nouns
145
Table 5.4: Verbal phrases in EModE poetic texts
154
Table 5.5: Verbal phrases in EModE prose texts
156
Table 5.6: Verbal phrases in Shakespeare's comedies and tragedies
157
Table 6.1: Types, tokens, and type/token ratios
171
Table 6.2: The occurrence of types
172
Table 6.3: The occurrence of tokens
173
Table 6.4a: Isomorphic and non-isomorphic forms: types
174
Table 6.4b: Isomorphic and non-isomorphic forms: tokens
174
Table 6.5: The occurrence of tokens per each subperiod
175
Table 6.6: The distribution of occurrences across text types
176
Table 6.7: Singular vs. plural nouns
180
Table 6.8: Pre- and postmodification in the constructions studied
183
Table 6.9a: The use of a deverbal noun with more than one verb in the data
194
Table 6.9b: The use of a deverbal noun with three or four verbs
197
“This carefully and attractively produced volume promises to be a valuable resource to scholars with a particular interest in the growth and enrichment of the English language through complex verb development.



“This collection contributes usefully to teaching as well as scholarship.



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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  99010762 | Marc record