Article published in:
Temporality in Interaction
Edited by Arnulf Deppermann and Susanne Günthner
[Studies in Language and Social Interaction 27] 2015
► pp. 95120

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Hellermann, John
2018. Languaging as competencing: considering language learning as enactment. Classroom Discourse 9:1  pp. 40 ff. Crossref logo

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