Guidelines

  1. Contributions should preferably be in English. If not written by a native speaker of English it is advisable to have the paper checked by a native speaker. Articles in French, Spanish or German will also be considered.
  2. Authors wishing to submit articles for publication in TERMINOLOGY are requested to do so through the journal’s online submission and manuscript tracking site. Please consult the Short Guide to EM for Authors before you submit your paper. Articles should not exceed 9,000 words (excluding references). In the main text of the submission email, the length of the paper excluding references should be explicitly stated.
  3. COPYRIGHT: Authors are responsible for observing the laws of copyright when quoting or reproducing material. The copyright of articles published in TERMINOLOGY is held by the Publisher. Permission for the author to use the article elsewhere will be granted by the Publisher providing full acknowledgement is given to the source.
  4. Authors are responsible for observing the laws of copyright when quoting or reproducing material. The copyright of articles published in TERMINOLOGY is held by the Publisher. Permission for the author to use the article elsewhere will be granted by the Publisher proving full acknowledgement is given to the source.
  5. Papers should be reasonably divided into sections and, if necessary, sub-sections.
  6. SPELLING should be British English or American English and should be consistent throughout the paper, unless the paper is in French, Spanish or German.
  7. Any graphics created in Word (or Excel) can remain in the text and do not require special action. Graphics that have been created in another program, such as special purpose graphics software, and any other illustrations should be supplied separately. Please make sure that these have a minimum resolution of 300 dpi when resized to the book page. Reference to any graphics should be made in the main text and an indication should be given where they should appear approximately.
  8. TABLES should be numbered consecutively and should be referred to in the main text.
  9. NOTES should be kept to an absolute minimum. Note indicators in the text should appear at the end of sentences or phrases, and follow the respective punctuation marks.
  10. REFERENCES: It is essential that the references are formatted to the specifications given in these guidelines, as these cannot be formatted automatically. This journal uses the ‘Author-Date’ style as described in the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.
    References in the text: These should be as precise as possible, giving page references where necessary; for example (Clahsen 1991, 252) or: as in Brown et al. (1991, 252). All references in the text should appear in the references section.
    References section: References should be listed first alphabetically and then chronologically. The section should include all (and only!) references that are actually mentioned in the text.
    A note on capitalization in titles. For titles in English, CMS uses headline-style capitalization. In titles and subtitles, capitalize the first and last words, and all other major words (nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, some conjunctions). Do not capitalize articles; prepositions (unless used adverbially or adjectivally, or as part of a Latin expression used adverbially or adjectivally); the conjunctions and, but, for, or, nor; to as part of an infinitive; as in any grammatical function; parts of proper names that would be lower case in normal text; the second part of a species name. For more details and examples, consult the Chicago Manual of Style. For any other languages, and English translations of titles given in square brackets, CMS uses sentence-style capitalization: capitalization as in normal prose, i.e., the first word in the title, the subtitle, and any proper names or other words normally given initial capitals in the language in question.

    Examples

    Book:

    Görlach, Manfred. 2003. English Words Abroad. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Spear, Norman E., and Ralph R. Miller (eds). 1981. Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Article (in book):

    Adams, Clare A., and Anthony Dickinson. 1981. “Actions and Habits: Variation in Associative Representation during Instrumental Learning.” In Information Processing in Animals: Memory Mechanisms, ed. by Norman E. Spear, and Ralph R. Miller, 143–186. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Article (in journal):

    Claes, Jeroen, and Luis A. Ortiz López. 2011. “Restricciones pragmáticas y sociales en la expresión de futuridad en el español de Puerto Rico [Pragmatic and social restrictions in the expression of the future in Puerto Rican Spanish].” Spanish in Context 8: 50–72.

    Rayson, Paul, Geoffrey N. Leech, and Mary Hodges. 1997. “Social Differentiation in the Use of English Vocabulary: Some Analyses of the Conversational Component of the British National Corpus.” International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 2 (1): 120–132.

  11. Authors are kindly requested to check their manuscripts very carefully before submission in order to avoid delays and extra costs at the proof stage. Once a paper is accepted for publication, it will be allocated to a forthcoming issue and the first author will receive page proofs by email in PDF format for final correction by email in PDF format. These must be returned with corrections by the dates determined by the publication schedule. Any author's alterations other than typographical corrections in the page proofs may be charged to the author.

  12. Authors will receive a complimentary copy of the issue in which their paper appears.