Chapter published in:
The Dynamics of Interactional Humor: Creating and negotiating humor in everyday encounters
Edited by Villy Tsakona and Jan Chovanec
[Topics in Humor Research 7] 2018
► pp. 77104
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2021. Topics and Settings in Sociopragmatics. In The Cambridge Handbook of Sociopragmatics,  pp. 247 ff. DOI logo
Castillo Ortiz, Pedro Jesús
2022. Chapter 7. Humour and self-interpreting in the media. In Humour in Self-Translation [Topics in Humor Research, 11],  pp. 141 ff. DOI logo
Dynel, Marta & Valeria Sinkeviciute
2021. Conversational Humour. In The Cambridge Handbook of Sociopragmatics,  pp. 408 ff. DOI logo
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2022. Humor in conversation among bilinguals. The European Journal of Humour Research 10:3  pp. 168 ff. DOI logo

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