Conversational Humour and (Im)politeness

A pragmatic analysis of social interaction

| The University of Queensland
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027204134 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027262110 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
Conversational Humour and (Im)politeness is the first systematic study that offers a socio-pragmatic perspective on humorous practices such as teasing, mockery and taking the piss and their relation to (im)politeness. Analysing data from corpora, reality television and interviews in Australian and British cultural contexts, this book contributes to cross-cultural and intercultural research on humour and its role in social interaction. Although, in both contexts, jocular verbal practices are highly valued and a positive response – the ‘preferred reaction’ – can be expected, the conceptualisation of what is seen as humorous can vary, especially in terms of what ‘goes too far’. By examining how attempts at humour can occasion offence, presenting a distinction between ‘frontstage’ and ‘backstage’ perceptions of jocularity and looking at how language users evaluate jocular behaviours in interaction, this study shows how humour and (im)politeness are co-constructed and negotiated in discourse. This book will be of interest to scholars and students in pragmatics, conversational humour, (im)politeness, intercultural communication, discourse analysis, television studies and interaction in English-speaking contexts.
[Topics in Humor Research, 8]  2019.  xi, 274 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
xi
Chapter 1. Introduction
2–9
Chapter 2. Meanwhile in the world of (im)politeness
12–29
Chapter 3. Data: From corpora to reality television to interviews
32–60
Chapter 4. Conversational humour: Jocular verbal behaviours
62–89
Chapter 5. Jocular verbal behaviours in Australian and British cultural contexts
92–123
Chapter 6. Frontstage and backstage reactions to jocularity
126–148
Chapter 7. Negative evaluations of jocularity
150–171
Chapter 8. Interviewees’ attitudes to jocularity
174–243
Chapter 9. Conclusions
246–249
References
251–272
Subject index
273
“There are far too many studies that talk the talk (blind us with yet more theoretical notions and terms) without walking the walk (doing the necessary empirical footwork). This study, couched in lucid prose, brilliantly does both. Focusing on humour in interactions, it eclectically combines theory from (im)politeness and humour research, and drives it all robustly forward with data from corpora, reality television discourse and qualitative interviewing. Trailblazing, to say the least!”
“This book offers fascinating insights into British and Australian jocular practices based on interviews and the discourse of reality television shows, an excellent source of publically available natural language data. I highly recommend Valeria Sinkeviciute’s work to everybody interested in cross-cultural and inter-cultural studies on conversational humour and (im)politeness.”
“In this thoroughly empirical study of phenomena at the crossroads of humor and politeness, Valeria Sinkeviciute shows how interpretations of verbal behavior can go in different directions, even at the same time, and for the same participants, at different levels of publicness. Her work makes it impossible for pragmaticians to avoid thinking about meaning in terms of meaning potential.”
References

References

Agha, A.
(2006) Language and social relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Alberts, J. K., Kellar-Guenther, Y., & Corman, S. R.
(1996) That’s not funny: Understanding recipients’ responses to teasing. Western Journal of Communication, 60(4), 337–357. Crossref link
Alvesson, M.
(2011) Interpreting interviews. Los Angeles and London: Sage. Crossref link
Antonopoulou, E. & Sifianou, M.
(2003) Conversational dynamics of humour: the telephone game in Greek. Journal of Pragmatics, 35(5), 741–769. Crossref link
Archer, D. E.
(2008) Verbal aggression and impoliteness: Related or synonymous? In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 181–207). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Ardington, A.
(2011) Tourist advertising of Australia: Impolite or situation-appropriate? Or a uniquely Aussie invite lost in translation. In B. L. Davies, M. Haugh & A. J. Merrison (Eds), Situated politeness (pp. 251–269). London and New York: Continuum.
Arundale, R. B.
(1999) An alternative model and ideology of communication for an alternative for a politeness theory. Pragmatics, 9(1), 119–153.
Arundale, R. B.
(2006) Face as relational and interactional: A communication framework for research on face, facework, and politeness. Journal of Politeness Research, 2, 193–216. Crossref link
(2009) Face as emergent in interpersonal communication: An alternative to Goffman. In F. Bargiela-Chiappini & M. Haugh (Eds.), Face, communication and social interaction (pp. 33–54). London and Oakville: Equinox.
Attardo, S.
(2003) Introduction: The pragmatics of humor. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1287–1294. Crossref link
Auer, P. & di Luzio, A.
(Eds.) (1992) The contextualization of language. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Baker, S. J.
(1945) The Australian language. Sydney and London: Aungus and Robertson Ltd.
Barbe, K.
(1995) Irony in context. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Bargiela-Chiappini, F.
(2003) Face and politeness: New (insights) for old (concepts). Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1453–1469. Crossref link
Barrow, R.
(2005) On the duty of not taking offence. Journal of Moral Education, 34(3), 265–275. Crossref link
Bateson, G.
(1987) A theory of play and fantasy. In G. Bateson, Steps to an ecology of mind (pp. 183–198). Northvale, New Jersey and London: Jason Aronson Inc.
Bax, M. & Kádár, D. Z.
(2011) The historical understanding of historical (im)politeness. Introductory notes. Journal of Historical Pragmatics, 12(1–2), 1–24.
(Eds.) (2012) Understanding historical (im)politeness. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Bazalgette, P.
(2001) Golden Age? This is it. The Guardian. Available from http://​www​.theguardian​.com​/media​/2001​/nov​/19​/broadcasting​.comment2 (accessed on 25 May, 2016).
Beck, S., Clabaugh, S. E., Clark, R. A., Connelly Kosovski, M., Daar, R., Hefner, V., Kmetz, T., McDaniel, S., Miller, L., Moriarty, C., Qian, Z., Raja, S., Ramey, M. & Ratnadeep, S.
(2007) Teasing among college men and women. Communication Studies, 58(2), 157–172. Crossref link
Bednarek, M.
(2013) “There’s no harm, is there, in letting your emotions out”: A multimodal perspective on language, emotion and identity in MasterChef Australia. In N. Lorenzo-Dus & Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P. (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 88–114). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Beebe, L. M.
(1995) “Polite Fictions: Instrumental Rudeness as Pragmatic Competence.” In J. E. Alatis, C. A. Straehle, B. Gallenberger & M. Ronkin (Eds.), Linguistics and the education of language teachers: Ethnolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic aspects, Georgetown University roundtable on language and linguistics (pp. 154–168). Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press.
Bell, N. D.
(2005) Exploring L2 language play as an aid to SLL: A case study of humour in NS–NNS interaction. Applied Linguistics, 26(2), 192–218. Crossref link
(2006) Interactional adjustments in humorous intercultural communication. Intercultural Pragmatics, 3(1), 1–28. Crossref link
Bell, N. D.
(2007) How native and non-native English speakers adapt to humor in intercultural interaction. Humor, 20 (1), 27–48.
Bell, N. D.
(2009a) Impolite responses to failed humour. In N. R. Norrick & D. Chiaro (Eds.), Humour in interaction (pp. 143–163). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2009b) Responses to failed humour. Journal of Pragmatics, 41, 1825–1836. Crossref link
(2013) Responses to incomprehensible humour. Journal of Pragmatics, 57, 176–189. Crossref link
Bernal, M.
(2008) Do insults always insult? Genuine impoliteness versus non-genuine impoliteness in colloquial Spanish. Pragmatics, 18(4), 775–802. Crossref link
Bignell, J.
(2005) Big Brother: Reality TV in the twenty-first century. Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Bilmes, J.
(1988) The concept of preference in conversation analysis. Language in Society, 17, 161–181. Crossref link
Biltereyst, D.
(2004) Big Brother and its moral guardians: Reappraising the role of intellectuals in the Big Brother panic. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 9–15). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Blas Arroyo, J. L.
(2013) “No eres inteligente ni para tener amigos… Pues anda que tú” [“You are not even clever enough to have any friends… Look who’s talking!”]: A quantitative analysis of the production and reception of impoliteness in present-day Spanish reality television.” In N. Lorenzo-Dus & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real Talk: Reality Television and Discourse Analysis in Action (pp. 218–244). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Blum-Kulka, S.
(2000) Gossipy events at family dinners: Negotiating sociability, presence and the moral order. In J. Coupland (Ed.), Small talk (pp. 213–240). London: Longman.
Bollmer, J. M., Harris, M. J., Milich, R. & Georgesen, J. C.
(2003) Taking offense: Effects of personality and teasing history on behavioral and emotional reactions to teasing. Journal of Personality, 71(4), 557–603. Crossref link
Bonner, F.
(2003) Ordinary television. London and New Delhi: Sage Publications.
Bousfield, D.
(2007) Beginnings, middles and ends: A biopsy of the dynamics of impoliteness exchanges. Journal of Pragmatics, 39, 2185–2216. Crossref link
(2008a) Impoliteness in interaction. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2008b) Impoliteness in the struggle for power. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 127–153). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
(2010) Researching impoliteness and rudeness: Issues and definitions. In M. A. Locher & S. L. Graham (Eds.), Interpersonal pragmatics (pp. 101–134). Berlin and New York: De Gruyter Mouton.
Boxer, D. & Cortés-Conde, F.
(1997) From bonding and biting: Conversational joking and identity display. Journal of Pragmatics, 27, 275–295. Crossref link
Brown, P. & Levinson, S. C.
(1987) Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Bubel, C. M. & Spitz, A.
(2006) “One of the last vestiges of gender bias”: The characterization of women through the telling of dirty jokes in Ally McBeal. Humor, 19(1), 71–104. Crossref link
Bublitz, W. & Hübler, A.
(Eds.) (2007) Metapragmatics in use. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Bucholtz, M.
(2004) Styles and stereotypes: The linguistic negotiation of identity among Laotian American youth. Pragmatics, 14 (2/3), 127–147.
Bryson, B.
(2000) Down under. London: Black Swan.
Caffi, C.
(1994) Metapragmatics. In R. E. Asher & J. M. Y. Simpson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of language and linguistics (Volume 5), (pp. 2461–2466). Oxford and New York: Pergamon Press.
Cann, A. & Calhoun, L. G.
(2001) Perceived personality associations with differences in sense of humor: Stereotypes of hypothetical others with high or low senses of humor. Humor, 14(2), 117–130. Crossref link
Carrell, A.
(1997) Joke competence and humor competence. Humor, 10(2), 173–185. Crossref link
Carter, G.
(2004) Epilogue – in front of our eyes: Notes on Big Brother. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 250–257). London and New York: Wallflower Press
Cavender, G.
(2004) In search of community on Reality TV: America’s Most Wanted and Survivor. In S. Holmes & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Understanding reality television (pp. 154–172). London and New York: Routledge.
Centorrino, M.
(2004) Grande Fratello: Interactions between tension and obscenity in Big Brother Italy. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 151–167). London and New York: Wallflower Press
Chafe, W.
(2007) The importance of not being earnest. The feeling behind laughter and humor. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: Benjamins. Crossref link
Chandler, D. & Griffiths, M.
(2004) Who is the fairest of them all? Gendered readings of Big Brother UK. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 30–61). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Charmaz, K.
(2003) Qualitative interviewing and grounded theory analysis. In J. A. Holtein & J. F. Gubrium (Eds.), Inside interviewing: New lenses, new concerns (pp. 311–330). London and New Delhi: Sage Publications
Cheng, W.
(2003) Humor in intercultural conversations. Semiotica, 146, 287–306.
Chovanec, J.
(2011) Humour in quasi-conversations: Constructing fun in online sports journalism. In M. Dynel (Ed.), The pragmatics of humour across discourse domain (pp. 243–264). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Christie, C.
(2015) Epilogue. Politeness research: Sociolinguistics as applied pragmatics. Journal of Politeness Research, 11(2), 355–364. Crossref link
Clark, J.
(2011) “No, like proper north”: Re-drawing boundaries in an emergent community of practice. In Linguistic Politeness Research Group (Eds.). Discursive approaches to politeness (pp. 109–132). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
(2013) “Maybe she just hasn’t matured yet”: Politeness, gate-keeping and the maintenance of status quo in a community of practice. Journal of Politeness Research, 9(2), 211–237. Crossref link
Clift, R.
(2012) Identifying action: Laughter in non-humorous reported speech. Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 1303–1312. Crossref link
(2016) Don’t make me laugh: Responsive laughter in (dis)affiliation. Journal of Pragmatics, 100, 73–88. Crossref link
Clissold, B.
(2004) Candid Camera and the origins of Reality TV: Contextualising a historical precedent. In S. Holmes & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Understanding reality television> (pp. 33–53). London and New York: Routledge
COED
(1977) The compact edition of Oxford English dictionary, volume II P-Z. OUP.
Coleman, S., & Ross, K.
(2010) The media and the public: “Them” and “Us” in media discourse. London: Wiley-Blackwell. Crossref link
Corner, J.
(2002) Performing the real. Television & New Media, 3(3), 255–269. Crossref link
Couper-Kuhlen, E.
(2009) A sequential approach to affect: The case of ‘disappointment’. In M. Haakana, M. Laakso & J. Lindström (Eds.), Talk in interaction: Comparative dimensions (pp. 94–123). SKS Finnish Literature Society.
Culpeper, J.
(1996) Towards an anatomy of impoliteness. Journal of Pragmatics, 25, 349–367. Crossref link
(1998) (Im)politeness in dramatic dialogue. In J. Culpeper, M. Short & P. Verdonk (Eds.), Exploring the language of drama: From text to context (pp. 83–95). London: Routledge.
(2005) Impoliteness and entertainment in the television quiz show: The Weakest Link. Journal of Politeness Research, 1(1), 35–72. Crossref link
(2008) Reflections on impoliteness, relational work and power. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 17–44). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
(2010) Conventionalised impoliteness formulae. Journal of Pragmatics, 42, 3232–3245. Crossref link
(2011a) Impoliteness: Using language to cause offence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
(2011b) “It’s not what you said, it’s how you said it!” Prosody and impoliteness. In (Eds.), Discursive approaches to politeness (pp.57–83). Berlin: De Gruyten Mouton. Crossref link
(2012) (Im)politeness: Three issues. Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 1128–1133. Crossref link
Culpeper, J., Bousfield, D., & Wichmann, A.
(2003) Impolitenes revisited: with special reference to dynamic and prosodic aspects. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1545–1579. Crossref link
Culpeper, J., & Haugh, M.
(2014) Pragmatics and the English Language. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke. Crossref link
(2015) Politeness theory and integrative pragmatics. A talk at the International Pragmatics Conference, Antwerp, Belgium. 28 July 2015.
Culpeper, J., Haugh, M., & Sinkeviciute, V.
(2017) (Im)politeness and mixed messages. In J. Culpeper, M. Haugh & D. Z. Kádár (Eds.), Palgrave handbook of linguistic (im)politeness (pp. 323–355). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Culpeper, J., O’Driscoll, J., & Hardaker, C.
(2019) Notions of politeness in Britain and North America. In E. Ogiermann & P. Garces-Conejos (Eds), From speech acts to lay understandings of politeness. Multilingual and multicultural perspectives (pp. 175–200). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Culpeper, J., & Kádár, D. Z.
(Eds.) (2010) Historical (im)politeness. Bern and Berlin: Peter Lang. Crossref link
Culpeper, J., & Holmes, O.
(2013) (Im)politeness and exploitative TV in Britain and north America: The X-Factor and American Idol. In N. Lorenzo-Dus & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 169–198). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Currie, G. & Ichino, A.
(2013) Imagination and make-believe. In B. Gaut & D. Lopes (Eds.), The Routledge companion to aesthetics (pp. 320–329). Routledge, London, New York.
Davies, C. E.
(2003) How English-learners joke with native speakers: An interactional sociolinguistic perspective on humor as collaborative discourse across cultures. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1361–1385. Crossref link
Davies, M.
(2004-) BYU-BNC. (Based on the British National Corpus from Oxford University Press). Available online at http://​corpus​.byu​.edu​/bnc/.
Davies, B. L., Haugh, M. & Merrison, A. J.
(2011) Situated politeness. London and New York: Continuum.
Delbridge, A. & Butler, S.
(1999) The Macquarie Dictionary, its history and its editorial practices. Lexikos, 9, 152–171.
Desai, C.
(2009) Ragging: Let’s say NO to it. Indian Journal of Pharmacology, 41(2), 59. Crossref link
Dobs, A. M., & Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P.
(2013) Impoliteness in polylogal interaction: Accounting for face-threat witnesses’ responses. Journal of Pragmatics, 53, 112–130. Crossref link
Docker, J.
(2005) Is the United States a failed society? Borderlands ejournal, 4(1).
Drew, P.
(1987) Po-faced receipts of teases. Linguistics, 25(1), 219–253. Crossref link
Dubois, A. J. A.
(1818) Character, manners, and customs of the people of India. Philadelphia: M’Carey & Son.
Dynel, M.
(2007) The linguistics of laughter. A corpus-assisted study of laughter-talk: Alan Partington, Routledge Studies in Linguistics, Oxon, 2006, 262 pp., ISBN10: 0-415-38166-5/ISBN13: 978-0-415-38166-6. Journal of Pragmatics, 39, 1870–1878. Crossref link
(2008) No aggression, only teasing: The pragmatics of teasing and banter. Lodz Papers in Pragmatics, 4(2), 241–261. Crossref link
(2009a) Beyond a joke: Types of conversational humour. Language and Linguistics Compass. Semantics and Pragmatics, 3, 1284–1299. Crossref link
(2009b) Humorous garden-paths: A pragmatic-cognitive study. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
(2009c) Where cooperation meets politeness: Revisiting politeness models in view of the Gricean framework. Brno Studies in English, 35, 23–43.
(2010) Not hearing things – Hearer/listener categories in polylogues. mediAzioni 1974-43829, http://​mediazioni​.sitlec​.unibo​.it.
(2011a) Joker in the pack: Towards determining the status of humorous framing in conversations. In M. Dynel (Ed.), The pragmatics of humour across discourse domains (pp. 217–241). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2011b) A web of deceit: A neo-Gricean view on types of verbal deception. International Review of Pragmatics, 3, 139–167. Crossref link
(2011c) “You talking to me?” The viewer as a ratified hearer. Journal of Pragmatics, 43, 1628–1644. Crossref link
(2011d) Entertaining and enraging: The functions of verbal violence in broadcast political debates. In V. Tsakona & D. E. Popa (Eds.), Studies in political humour (pp. 109–134). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2012a) Humour on the house: Interactional construction of metaphor in film discourse. In J. Chovanec & I. Ermida (Eds.), Language and humour in the media (pp. 83–106). Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
(2012b) Setting our house in order: The workings of impoliteness in multi-party film discourse. Journal of Politeness Research, 8(2), 161–194. Crossref link
(2013a) Impoliteness as disaffiliative humour in film talk. In M. Dynel (Ed.), Developments in linguistic humour theory (pp. 105–144). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2013b) Being cooperatively impolite: Grice’s model in the context of (im)politeness theories. In I. Kecskes, & J. Romero-Trillo (Eds), Research trends in intercultural pragmatics (pp. 55–83). Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
(2015) The landscape of impoliteness research. Journal of Politeness Research, 11(2), 329–354. Crossref link
(2016) Conceptualizing conversational humour as (im)politeness: The case of film talk. Journal of Politeness Research, 12(1), 117–147. Crossref link
(2017) Academics vs. American scriptwriters vs. Academics: A battle over the etic and emic ‘sarcasm’ and ‘irony’ labels. Language & Communication, 55, 69–87.
(2018a) No child’s play: A philosophical pragmatic view of overt pretence as a vehicle for conversational humour. In V. Tsakona & J. Chovanec (Eds), Creating and negotiating humor in everyday interactions (pp. 205–228). Amsterdam and Philadephia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2018b) Lying and humour. In J. Meibauer (Ed.), Oxford handbook of lying (pp. 326–339). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Dynel, M. & Sinkeviciute, V.
(forthcoming). Conversational humour. In M. Haugh, D. Z. Kádár & M. Terkourafi Eds. Handbook of sociopragmatics. Cambridge University Press.
Dyrenfurth, N.
(2015) Mateship. Melbourne and London: Scribe.
Eelen, G.
(2001) A critique of politeness theories. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.
Ehlich, K.
(1992) On the historicity of politeness. In R. Watts, I. Sachiko & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. 71–107). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Eisenberg, A. R.
(1986) Teasing: Verbal play in two Mexicano homes. In B. B. Schieffelin & E. Ochs (Eds.), Language socialization across cultures. Studies in the social and cultural foundations of language 3 (pp. 182–198). New York: Cambridge University Press.
Eisterhold, J.
(2007) Failed humor in American discourse. Proceedings of the Paper Presented at International Society for Humor Studies. RI, Newport.
Endemol Australia
Endemol UK
. Big Brother. http://​www​.endemolshineuk​.com​/shows/. (21 March, 2018.)
Espelage, D. L. & Asidao, C. S.
(2001) Conversations with middle school students about bullying and victimization. Journal of Emotional Abuse, 2(2–3), 49–62. Crossref link
Ferguson, M. A. & Ford, T. E.
(2008) Disparagement humor: A theoretical and empirical review of psychoanalytic, superiority, and social identity theories. Humor, 21(3), 283–312. Crossref link
Ford, T. E. & Ferguson, M. A.
(2004) Social consequences of disparagement humor: A prejudiced norm theory. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 8(1), 79–74. Crossref link
Foster, D.
(2004) ‘Jump in the pool’: The competitive culture of Survivor fan networks. In S. Holmes & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Understanding reality television (pp. 270–289). London and New York: Routledge.
Fox, K.
(2004) Watching the English. The hidden rules of English behaviour. Hodder, London.
Fraser, B.
(1990) Perspectives on politeness. Journal of Pragmatics, 14, 219–236. Crossref link
Fraser, B. & Nolen, W.
(1981) The association of deference with linguistic form. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 27, 93–109.
Fukushima, S. & Haugh, M.
(2014) The role of emic understandings in theorizing im/politeness: The metapragmatics of attentiveness, empathy and anticipatory inference in Japanese and Chinese. Journal of Pragmatics, 74, 165–179. Crossref link
Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P.
(2010) A genre approach to the study of im-politeness. International Review of Pragmatics, 2, 46–94. Crossref link
Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P., Bou-Franch, P. & Lorenzo-Dus, N.
(2013) Identity and Impoliteness: The Expert in the Talent Show Idol. Journal of Politeness Research, 9(1), 97–121. Crossref link
Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P., & Lorenzo-Dus, N.
(2013) Reality television: A discourse-analytical perspective. In N. Lorenzo-Dus & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 9–23). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
García-Pastor, M. D.
(2008) Political campaign debates as zero-sum games: Impoliteness and power in candidates’ exchanges. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 101–123). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Geyer, N.
(2010) Teasing and ambivalent face in Japanese multi-party discourse. Journal of Pragmatics, 42, 2120–2130. Crossref link
Gibson, C.
(2013) Welcome to Bogan-ville: reframing class and place through humour. Journal of Australian Studies, 37(1), 62–75. Crossref link
Glenn, P.
(2003) Laughter in interaction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Glenn, P., & Holt, E.
(2013) Introduction. In P. Glenn & L. Holt (Eds.), Studies of laughter in interaction (London, pp. 1–22). Bloomsbury.
Goddard, C.
(2006) “Lift your game Martina!”: Deadpan jocular irony and the ethnopragmatics of Australian English”. In C. Goddard (Ed.), Ethnopragmatics: Understanding discourse in cultural context (pp. 65–97). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
(2009) “Not taking yourself too seriously in Australian English: Semantic explications, cultural scripts, corpus evidence.” Intercultural Pragmatics, 6(1), 29–53. Crossref link
(2012) ‘Early interactions’ in Australian English, American English, and English English: Cultural differences and cultural scripts.” Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 1038–1050. Crossref link
Goffman, E.
(1959) The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Doubleday Anchor Books.
(1972 [1967]) On face-work: An analysis ritual elements in social interaction. In E. Goffman, Interaction ritual: Essays on face-to-face behaviour (pp. 5–45). Middlesex and Ringwood: Penguin Books.
(1979) Footing. Semiotica, 25, 1–29. Crossref link
(1983) The interaction order. American Sociological Review, 48(1), 1–17. Crossref link
Goodwin, C., & Duranti, A.
(1992) Rethinking context: An introduction. In A. Duranti & C. Goodwin (Eds.), Rethinking context: Language as an interactive phenomenon (pp. 1–42). Cambridge: CUP.
Gosch, E.
(2007) Protesters take their ‘Pom’ whinge to UN. The Australian. Available from http://​www​.theaustralian​.com​.au​/news​/nation​/protesters​-take​-their​-pom​-whinge​-to​-un​/story​-e6frg6nf​-1111112897773 (accessed on 26 May 2016).
Gorden, R. L.
(1971 [1969]Interviewing: Strategy, techniques, and tactics. Homewood: The Dorsey Press.
Grainger, K.
(2011) ‘First order’ and ‘second order’ politeness: Institutional and intercultural contexts. In (Eds.), Discursive approaches to politeness (pp. 167–188). Berlin and Boston: De Gruyten Mouton. Crossref link
Grice, P.
(1975 [1967]) Logic and conversation. In P. Cole & J. L. Morgan (Eds.), Syntax and semantics III: Speech acts (pp. 41–58). New York: Academic Press.
Grindsted, A.
(1997) Joking as a strategy in Spanish and Danish negotiations. In F. Bargiela-Chiappini & S. Harris (Eds.), The language of business: An international perspective (pp. 159–182). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Gu, Y.
(1990) Politeness phenomena in Modern Chinese. Journal of Pragmatics, 14, 237–257. Crossref link
Gumperz, J. J.
(1987) Foreword. In P. Brown & S. Levinson, Politeness: Some universals in language usage (pp. xiii–xiv). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
(1992) Contextualization revisited. In P. Auer & di Luzio, A (Eds.), The contextualization of language (pp. 39–53). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Gumperz, J. J. & Berenz, N.
(1993) Transcribing conversational exchanges. In J. A. Edwards & M. D. Lampert (Eds.), Talking data: Transcription and coding in discourse research (pp. 91–121). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey.
Harris, S.
(2001) Being politically impolite: Extending politeness theory to adversarial political discourse. Discourse & Society, 12(4), 451–472. Crossref link
(2011) The limits of politeness re-visited: Courtroom discourse as a case in point.” In (Eds.), Discursive approaches to politeness (pp. 85–108). Berlin: De Gruyten Mouton. Crossref link
Harris, S. & Bargiela-Chiappini, F.
(1997) The languages of business: Introduction and overview. In F. Bargiela-Chiappini, & S. Harris (Eds.), The languages of business: An international perspective (pp. 1–18). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Hartley, F.
(2014 [1860]) The ladies’ book of etiquette and manual of politeness. London: Hesperus.
Haugh, M.
(2004) Revisiting the conceptualisation of politeness in English and Japanese. Multilingua, 23(1/2), 85–109. Crossref link
(2007) The discursive challenge to politeness research. An interactional alternative. Journal of Politeness Research, 3, 295–317. Crossref link
(2009) Face and interaction. In F. Bargiela-Chiappini & M. Haugh (Eds.), Face, communication and social interaction (pp. 1–30). London and Oakville: Equinox.
(2010a) Jocular mockery, (dis)affiliation, and face. Journal of Pragmatics, 42(8), 2106–2119. Crossref link
(2010b) When is an email really offensive?: Argumentativity and variability in evaluations of impoliteness. Journal of Politeness Research, 6, 7–31. Crossref link
(2011) Humour, face and im/politeness in getting acquainted. In B. L. Davies, M. Haugh & A. J. Merrison (Eds.), Situated politeness (pp. 165–184). London and New York: Continuum.
(2013) Im/politeness, social practice and the participation order. Journal of Pragmatics, 58 53–72.
(2014) Jocular mockery as interactional practice in everyday Anglo-Australian conversation. Australian Journal of Linguistics, 34(1), 76–99. Crossref link
(2015) Impoliteness and taking offence in initial interactions. Journal of Pragmatics, 86, 36–42. Crossref link
(2016) “Just kidding”: Teasing and claims to non-serious intent. Journal of Pragmatics, 95, 120–136. Crossref link
(2017a) Teasing. In Salvatore Attardo (ed.), Routledge handbook of language and humor. Routledge.
(2017b) Mockery and (non-)seriousness in initial interactions amongst American and Australian speakers of English. In D. Carbaugh (Ed.), Handbook of communication across cultures (pp. 104–177). London: Routledge.
(2018) Corpus-based pragmatics. In A. H. Jucker, K. P. Schneider, & W. Bublitz (Eds), Methods in pragmatics (pp. 619–643). De Gruyter.
Haugh, M., & Hinze, C.
(2003) A metapragmatic approach to deconstructing the concepts of ‘face’ and ‘politeneness’ in Chinese, English and Japanese. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1581–1611. Crossref link
Haugh M., & Watanabe, Y.
(2009) Analysing Japanese ‘face-in-interaction’: Insights from intercultural business meetings. In F. Bargiela-Chiappini & M. Haugh (Eds.), Face, communication and social interaction (pp. 78–95). London and Oakville: Equinox.
Haugh, M. & Bousfield, D.
(2012) Mock impoliteness in interactions amongst Australian and British speakers of English. Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 1099–1114. Crossref link
Haugh, M. & Sinkeviciute, V.
(2018) Accusations and interpersonal conflict in televised multi-party interactions amongst speakers of (Argentinian and Peninsular) Spanish. Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict, 6(2), 248–270. Crossref link
(2019) Offence and conflict talk. In M. Evans, L. Jeffries & J. O’Driscoll (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of language in conflict (pp. 196–214). Routledge.
Hay, J.
(1994) Jocular abuse patterns in mixed-group interaction. Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics, 6, 26–55.
(2000) Functions of humour in the conversations of men and women. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 709–742. Crossref link
(2001) The pragmatics of humor support. Humor, 14(1), 55–82. Crossref link
Heerey, E. A., Capps, L., Keltner, D., & Kring, A. M.
(2005) Understanding teasing: Lessons from children with autism. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 33(1), 55–68. Crossref link
Heritage, J.
(1984) A change-of-state token and aspects of its sequential placement. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of social action. Studies in conversation analysis (pp. 299–345). Cambridge, London and New York: Cambridge University Press.
Hill, A.
(2002) Big Brother: The Real Audience. Television & New Media, 3(3), 323–340. Crossref link
(2004) Watching Big Brother UK. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 25–39). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
(2007) Restyling factual TV: Audiences and news, documentary and reality genres. New York: Routledge. Crossref link
(2015) Reality TV. London and New York: Routledge.
Hill, B., Sachiko I., Shoko I., Kawasaki, A., & Tsunao O.
(1986) Universals of linguistic politeness. Journal of Pragmatics, 10, 347–371. Crossref link
Hirst, J.
(2009) Sense and nonsense in Australian history. Blanc Inc Agenda, Melbourne.
(2010) The Australians: Insiders and outsiders on the national character since 1770. Melbourne: Black Inc Agenda.
Holmes, J.
(2000) Politeness, power and provocation: How humour functions in the workplace. Discourse Studies, 2, 159–185. Crossref link
(2005) Politeness and postmodernism – an appropriate approach to the analysis of language and gender? (Review article) Journal of Sociolinguistics, 9(1), 108–117. Crossref link
(2006) Sharing a laugh: Pragmatic aspects of humor and gender in the workplace. Journal of Pragmatics, 38, 26–50. Crossref link
Holmes, J., & Marra, M.
(2002) Over the edge? Subversive humor between colleagues and friends. Humor, 15(1), 65–87. Crossref link
Holmes, J. & Schnurr, S.
(2005) Politeness, humor and gender in the workplace: negotiating norms and identifying contestation. Journal of Politeness Research, 1, 121–149. Crossref link
Holmes, J., Marra, M., & Vine, B.
(2012) Politeness and impoliteness in ethnic varieties of New Zealand English. Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 1063–1076. Crossref link
Holstein, J. A. & Gubrium, J. F.
(1997) Active interviewing. In D. Silverman (Ed.), Qualitative research. Theory, method and practice (pp. 113–129). London: Sage Publications.
Holt, L.
(2012) Using laugh responses to defuse complaints. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 45(4), 430–448. Crossref link
Holt, E.
(2013) “There’s many a true word said in jest”: Seriousness and nonseriousness in interaction. In P. Glenn & E. Holt (Eds.), Studies of laughter in interaction (pp. 69–89). London, New Delhi, New York and Sydney: Bloomsbury.
Hunt, K. & Taylor, M.
(2013) Xenophobe’s® guide to the Aussies. London: Xenophobe’s® Guides.
Hutchby, I.
(1991) The organization of talk on talk radio. In P. Scannell (Ed.), Broadcast talk (pp. 119–137). London, Newbury Part and New Delhi: Sage Publications.
(1996) Confrontation talk: Arguments, asymmetries, and power on talk radio. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Ide, S.
(1989) Formal forms and discernment: Two neglected aspects of universals of linguistic politeness. Multilingua, 8(2/3), 223–248. Crossref link
Ide, S., Hill, B., Carnes, Y. M., Ogino, T., & Kawasaki, A.
(1992) The concept of politeness: An empirical study of American English and Japanese. In R. Watts, S. Ide & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. 299–323). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Jakobson, R.
(1960) Closing statement: Linguistics and poetics. In T. A. Sebeok (Ed.), Style in Language (pp. 350–377). New York and London: The Technology Press Massachusetts Institute of Technology and John Willy and Sons, Inc.
Janney, R. W. & Arndt, H.
(1992) Intracultural tact vs intercultural tact. In R. Watts, S. Ide & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. 21–41). Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.
Jaworski, A.
(1993) The power of silence: Social and pragmatic perspectives. Newbury Park, London and New Delhi: Sage. Crossref link
Jaworski, A., Coupland, N., & Galasiński, D.
(2004) Metalanguage: Why now? In A. Jaworski, N. Coupland & D. Galasiński (Eds.), Metalanguage. Social and ideological perspectives (pp. 3–8). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
Jefferson, G.
1972Side sequences. In D. Sudnow (Ed.), Studies in social interaction (pp. 294–338). New York: Free Press.
Jones, J.
(2004) Emerging platform identities: Big Brother UK and interactive multi-platform usage. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 210–231). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Jucker, A. H., Schneider, G., Taavitsainen, I., & Breustedt, B.
(2008) Fishing for compliments: Precision and recall in corpus-linguistic compliment research. In A. H. Jucker & I. Taavitsainen (Eds), Speech acts in the history of English (pp. 273–294). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Kádár, D. Z.
(2013) Intercultural politeness research. Opening lecture at the 1st Postgraduate Conference on Linguistic Politeness, Huddersfield, UK, 8 March 2013.
Kádár, D. Z., & Haugh, M.
(2013) Understanding politeness. Cambridge: CUP. Crossref link
Kádár, D. Z., & Márquez-Reiter, R.
(2015) (Im)politeness and (im)morality: Insights from intervention. Journal of Politeness Research, 11(2), 239–260.
Kasper, G.
(1990) Linguistic politeness: Current research issues. Journal of Pragmatics, 14, 193–218. Crossref link
Keats, D. M.
(2000) Interviewing: A practical guide for students and professionals. Buckingham and Philadelphia: Open University Press.
Kecskes, I.
(2017a) Cross-cultural and intercultural pragmatics. In Y. Huang (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of pragmatics. Oxford University Press.
(2017b) Context-dependency and impoliteness in intercultural communication. Journal of Politeness Research, 13 (1), 7–13.
Keltner, D., Young, R. C., Heerey, E. A., Oemig, C., & Monarch, N. D.
(1998) Teasing in hierarchical and intimate relations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 75(5), 1231–1247. Crossref link
Keltner, D., Capps, L., Kring, A. M., Young, R. C., & Heerey, E. A.
(2001) Just teasing: A conceptual analysis and empirical review. Psychological Bulletin, 127(2), 229–248. Crossref link
Kerbrat-Orecchioni, C.
(2004) Introducing polylogue. Journal of Pragmatics, 36, 1–24. Crossref link
Kienpointner, M.
(1997) Varieties of rudeness: Types and functions of oimpolite utterances. Functions of Language, 4(2), 251–287. Crossref link
(2008) Impoliteness and emotional arguments. Journal of Politeness Research, 4, 243–265. Crossref link
Kilborn, R.
(2003) Staging the real: Factual TV programming in the age of ‘Big Brother’. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press.
Kiliçbay, B.. & Binark, M.
(2004) Media monkeys: Intertextuality, fandom and Big Brother Turkey. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 140–150). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Kohnen, T.
(2009) Historical corpus pragmatics: Focus on speech acts and texts. In A. H. Jucker, D. Schreier, & M. Hundt (Eds.), Language and computers (Corpora: Pragmatics and Discourse, Papers from the 29th International Conference on English Language Research on Computerized Corpora (ICAME 29)), (pp. 13–36). Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi.
Kotthoff, H.
(1996) Impoliteness and conversational joking: On relational politics. Folia Linguistica, 30(3–4), 299–326.
(2007) Oral genres of humor: On the dialectic of genre knowledge and creative authoring. Pragmatics, 17(2), 263–296. Crossref link
Kowalski, R. M.
(2004) Proneness to, perceptions of, and responses to teasing: The influence of both intrapersonal and interpersonal factors. European Journal of Personality, 18, 331–349. Crossref link
Kuiper, N. A., & Martin, R. A.
(2007) Is sense of humor a positive personality trait? In W. Ruch (Ed.), The sense of humor: Explorations of a personality characteristic (pp. 159–178). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
Lachenicht, L. G.
(1980) Aggravating language: A study of abusive and insulting language. Paper in Linguistics: International Journal of Human Communication, 13(4), 607–688. Crossref link
Ladegaard, H. J.
(2011) Stereotypes and the discursive accomplishment of intergroup differentiation: Talking about ‘the other’ in a global business organization. Pragmatics, 21 (1), 85–109.
Lakoff, R. T.
(1973) The logic of politeness: Minding your p’s and q’s. In C. Corum, T. C. Smith-Stark & A. Weiser (Eds.), Papers from the ninth regional meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, (pp. 292–305).
(1989) The limits of politeness: Therapeutic and courtroom discourse. Multilingua, 8(2/3), 101–129. Crossref link
Lampert, M., & Ervin-Tripp, S.
(2006) Risky laughter: Teasing and self-directed joking among male and female friends. Journal of Pragmatics, 38, 51–72. Crossref link
Lave, J. & Wenger, E.
(1991) Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: CUP. Crossref link
Law, R.
(1997) Masculinity, place, and beer advertising in New Zealand: The Southern man campaign. New Zealand Geographer, 53(2), 22–28. Crossref link
Leech, G. N.
(1983) Principles of pragmatics. London and New York: Longman.
Leech, G.
(2005) Politeness: Is there an East-West divide? Journal of Foreign Languages, 6.
(2014) The pragmatics of politeness. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. Crossref link
Lewdon, C.
(2012) Kruger: Big Brother to be more ‘family friendly’, ‘more emphasis on challenges’. Available from http://​www​.throng​.com​.au​/2012​/01​/kruger​-big​-brother​-to​-be​-more​-family​-friendly​-more​-emphasis​-on​-challenges/ (accessed on 25 May, 2016).
Lightner, R. M., Bollmer, J. M., Harris, M. J., Milich, R., & Scambler, D. J.
(2000) What do you say to teasers? Parent and child evaluations of responses to teasing. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 21(4), 403–427. Crossref link
Limberg, H.
(2008) Threats in conflict talk: Impoliteness and manipulation. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 155–179). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Local, J.
(1996) Conversational phonetics: some aspects of news receipts in everyday talk. In E. Couper-Kuhlen & M. Selting (Eds.), Prosody in conversation: Interactional studies (pp. 177–230). Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Locher, M. A.
(2006) Polite behaviour within relational work: The discursive approach to politeness. Multilingua, 25, 249–267. Crossref link
Locher, M. A., & Watts, R. J.
(2005) Politeness Theory and Relational Work. Journal of Politeness Research, 1(1), 9–33. Crossref link
Locher, M. A., & Bousfield, D.
(2008) Introduction: Impoliteness and power in language. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 1–13). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Locher, M. A., & Watts, R. J.
(2008) Relational work and impoliteness: Negotiating norms of linguistic behaviour. In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 77–99). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
Lorenzo-Dus, N.
(2008) Real disorder in the court: An investigation of conflict talk in US television courtroom shows. Media, Culture & Society, 30(1), 81–107. Crossref link
(2009) “You’re barking mad, I’m out”: Impoliteness and broadcast talk. Journal of Politeness Research, 5, 159–187. Crossref link
Lorenzo-Dus, N., & Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P.
(Eds.) (2013) Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Lorenzo-Dus, N., Bou-Franch, P., & Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, P.
(2013) Impoliteness in US/UK talent shows: A diachronic study of evolution of a genre. In N. Lorenzo-Dus & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 199–217). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
LPRG (Linguistic Politeness Research Group)
(Eds.) 2011Discursive approaches to politeness. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter Mouton. Crossref link
Lucy, J. A.
(1993) Reflexive language and the human disciplines. In J. A. Lucy (Ed.), Reflexive language. Reported speech and metapragmatics (pp. 9–32). Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Lytra, V.
(2007) Teasing in contact encounters: Frames, participant positions and responses. Multilingua, 26, 381–408. Crossref link
Mao, L. R.
(1994) Beyond politeness theory: ‘Face’ revisited and renewed. Journal of Pragmatics, 21, 451–486. Crossref link
Maples, M. F., Dupey, P., Torres-Rivera, E., Phan, L. T., Verren, L., & Tlanusta Garrett, M.
(2001) Ethnic diversity and the use of humor in counseling: Appropriate or inappropriate? Journal of Counseling & Diversity, 79, 53–60. Crossref link
Martin, R. A.
(2001) Humor, laughter, and physical health: Methodological issues and research findings. Psychological Bulletin, 127(4), 504–519. Crossref link
(2007) Approaches to the sense of humour: A historical review. In W. Ruch (Ed.), The sense of humor: Explorations of a personality characteristic (pp. 15–60). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
Mathijs, E., & Hessels, W.
(2004) What viewer?: Notions of ‘the audience’ in the reception of Big Brother Belgium. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Rds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics, (pp. 62–76). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Mathijs, E. & Jones, J.
(2004) Introduction: Big Brother International. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Rds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 1–8). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Matsumoto, Y.
(1988) Reexamination of the universality of face. Politeness phenomena in Japanese. Journal of Pragmatics, 12, 403–426. Crossref link
(1989) Politeness and conversational universals – observations from Japanese. Multilingua, 8(2/3), 207–221. Crossref link
McCann, P. D., Plummer, D., & Minichiello, V.
(2010) Being the butt of the joke: homophobic humour, male identity, and its connection to emotional and physical violence for me. Health Sociology Review, 19(4), 505–521. Crossref link
McGregor, C.
(1966) Profile of Australia. London: Hodder & Stoughton.
McSween, C. E., Enron, H., Johnson F., McKenzie-Smythe, H., De Milo, I., & Jayfox, M.
(2011) Boganomics. The science of things bogans like. Sydney: Hachette Australia.
McSween, C. E., Enron, E., Johnson F., McKenzie-Smythe, H., De Milo, I., & Jayfox, M.
(2013) Things bogans like: Tribal tatts to reality TV: How to recognise the twenty-first century bogan. Sydney: Hachette Australia.
Meers, P., & Van Bauwel, S.
(2004) Debating Big Brother Belgium: Framing popular media culture. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 77–92). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Meyrowitz, J.
(1985) No sense of place: The impact of electronic media on social behavior. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
Miall, A., & Milsted, D.
(2014) Xenophobe’s® guide to the English. Xenophobe’s® Guides Ltd.
Miller, W. L., & Crabtree, B. F.
(2004) Depth interviewing. In S. Nagy Hesse-Biber & P. Leavy (Eds.), Approaches to qualitative research: A reader on theory and practice (pp. 185–202). Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
Miller, J., & Glassner, B.
(1997) The ‘inside’ and the ‘outside’: Finding realities in interviews. In D. Silverman (Ed.), Qualitative research: Theory, method and practice (pp. 99–112). London and New Delhi: Sage Publications.
Mills, S.
(2002) Rethinking politeness, impoliteness and gender identity. In L. Litosseliti & J. Sunderland (Eds.), Gender identity and discourse analysis (pp. 69–89). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2003) Gender and politeness. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
(2011) Discursive approaches to politeness and impoliteness. In (Eds.), Discursive approaches to politeness (pp. 19–56). Berlin and Boston: De Gruyten Mouton. Crossref link
(2013) Discursive approaches to politeness. Opening lecture at The 1st Postgraduate Conference on Linguistic Politeness, University of Huddersfield, 8 March 2013.
Mitchell, N., & Haugh, M.
(2015) Agency, accountability and evaluations of impoliteness. Journal of Politeness Research, 11(2), 207–238. Crossref link
Molloy, S.
Mullany, L.
(2008) “Stop hassling me!” Impoliteness, power and gender identity in the professional workplace.” In D. Bousfield & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 231–251). Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
(2011) Im/politeness, rapport management and workplace culture: Truckers performing masculinities on Canadian ice-roads.” In F. Bargiela-Chiappini & D. Z. Kádár (Eds.), Politeness across cultures (pp. 61–84). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Nakane, I.
(2007) Silence in intercultural communication. Amsterdam and Philadephia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Norbury, P.
(2011) Culture Smart! Britain: The essential guide to customs & culture. UK: Kuperard.
Norrick, N. R.
(1993) Conversational joking. Humor in everyday talk. Boomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.
(1994) Involvement and joking in conversation. Journal of Pragmatics, 22, 409–430. Crossref link
Norrick, N. R., & Spitz, A.
(2008) Humor as a resource for mitigating conflict in interaction. Journal of Pragmatics, 40, 1661–1686. Crossref link
Obana, Y., & Tomoda, T.
(1994) The sociological significance of “politeness” in English and Japanese languages. Report from a pilot study. Japanese Studies Bulletin, 14(2), 37–49. Crossref link
Olding, R.
(2010) When patriotism gets under your skin. The Sydney Morning Herald. http://​www​.smh​.com​.au​/national​/when​-patriotism​-gets​-under​-your​-skin​-20100326​-r328​.html (accessed 30 September 2015).
Olivieri, K. M.
(2003) A semantic analysis of teasing-related speech act verbs in Australian English. Armidale: University of New England BA Hons thesis.
Orwell, G.
(1950) 1984. New York: New American Library.
Park, R. E.
(1950) Race and culture. Glencoe, Illinois: The Free Press.
Partington, A.
(2006) The linguistics of laughter: A corpus-assisted study of laughter-talk. Routledge, London. Crossref link
(2008) Teasing at the White House: A corpus-assisted study of face work in performing and responding to teases. Text & Talk, 28(6), 771–792. Crossref link
Pawluk, C. J.
(1989) Social construction of teasing. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, 19(2), 145–167. Crossref link
Peeters, B.
(2004a) Tall poppies and egalitarianism in Australian discourse. From key word to cultural value. English World-Wide, 25(1), 1–25. Crossref link
(2004b) “Thou shalt not be a tall poppy”: Describing an Australian communicative (and behavioral) norm. Intercultural Pragmatics, 1(1), 71–92. Crossref link
Penney, B.
(2012) Culture Smart! Australia: The essential guide to customs & culture. UK: Kuperard.
Pitout, M.
(2004) Big Brother South Africa: A popular form of cultural expression. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 168–180). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Pizziconi, B.
(2007) The lexical mapping of politeness in British English and Japanese. Journal of Politeness Research, 3, 207–241. Crossref link
Plester, B. A., & Sayers, J.
(2007) “Taking the piss”: Functions of banter in the IT industry. Humor, 20(2), 157–187. Crossref link
Pomerantz, A.
(1984) Agreeing and disagreeing with assessments: Some features of preferred/dispreferred turn shapes. In M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (Eds.), Structures of social action. Studies in conversation analysis (pp. 57–101). Cambridge University Press and Editions de la Maison des Sciences de l’Homme.
Pomerantz, A., & Heritage, J.
(2013) Preference. In J. Sidnell & T. Stivers (Eds.), The handbook of conversation analysis (pp. 210–228). Backwell Publishing Ltd.
Prevignano, C. L., & di Luzio, A.
(2003) A discussion with John J. Gumperz. In S. L. Eerdmans, C. L. Prevignano, & A. di Luzio (Eds.), Language and interaction: Discussions with John J. Gumperz (pp. 7–29). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Priego-Valverde, B.
(2006) How funny it is when everybody gets going! A case of co-construction of humor in conversation. Círculo de Lingüística Aplicada a la Comunicación (clac), 27, 72–100.
Pullin Stark, P.
(2009) No joke–this is serious! Power, solidarity and humour in Business English as a Lingua Franca (BELF). In A. Mauranen & E. Ranta (Eds.), English as a Lingua Franca: Studies and findings (pp. 152–177). Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Pullin, P.
(2011) Humour and the integration of new staff in the workplace: An interactional study. In M. Dynel (Ed.), The pragmatics of humour across discourse domains (pp. 265–287). John Benjamins, Amsterdam. Crossref link
Radcliffe-Brown, A. R.
(1940) On joking relationships. Africa, 13, 195–210. Crossref link
Reber, E.
(2012) Affectivity in interaction. Sound objects in English. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Rickard, J.
(1998) Lovable larrikins and awful ockers. Journal of Australian Studies, 22(56), 78–85. Crossref link
Romaniuk, T.
(2013) Interviewee laughter and disaffiliation in broadcast news interviews. In P. Glenn, & E. Holt (Eds.), Studies of laugher in interaction (pp. 201–220). London and New Delhi: Bloomsbury.
Roscoe, J.
(2001) Big Brother Australia. Performing the ‘real’ twenty-four-seven. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 4(4), 472–488. Crossref link
(2002) Interview with Peter Abbott. Continuum, 16(2), 225–234.
(2004) Watching Big Brother at work. Production study of Big Brother Australia. In E. Mathijs, & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 181–193). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Ross, D.
(2013) Xenophobe’s® guide to the Scots. London: Xenophobe’s® Guides.
Roulston, K.
(2010) Considering quality in qualitative interviewing. Qualitative Research, 10(2), 199–228. Crossref link
Rowen, R.
(2017) Bogan as a keyword of contemporary Australia. In C. Levisen, & S. Waters (Eds.), Cultural Keywords in Discourse (pp. 55–82). Benjamins. Crossref link
Rowen, R., & Haugh, M.
(2017) Bogans, lawyers and teachers: On the interactional achievement of word meanings. Intercultural Pragmatics, 14(3), 327–359. Crossref link
Sacks, H.
(1987) On the preferences for agreement and contiguity in sequences in conversation. In G. Button, & J. R. E. Lee (Eds.), Talk and social organisation (pp. 54–69). Clevedon and Philadelphia: Multilingual Matters Ltd.
(1992) Lecture 10. ‘Everyone gets a chance to talk’. In G. Jefferson (Ed.), Lectures on conversation. Volume I (pp. 701–710). Oxford & Cambridge (USA): Blackwell.
Scannell, P.
(1991) Introduction: The relevance of talk. In P. Scannell (Ed.), Broadcast talk (pp. 1–13). London, Newbury Part and New Delhi: Sage Publications.
(2002) Big Brother as a television event. Television & New Media, 3(3), 271–282. Crossref link
Schnurr, S.
(2009) Constructing leader identities through teasing at work. Journal of Pragmatics, 41, 1125–1138. Crossref link
Schnurr, S., & Chan, A.
(2011) When laughter is not enough. Responding to teasing and self-denigrating humour at work. Journal of Pragmatics, 43, 20–35. Crossref link
Schnurr, S., & Holmes, J.
(2009) Using humour to do masculinity at work. In N. R. Norrick, & D. Chiaro (Eds.). Humour in interaction (pp. 101–123). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
Schnurr, S., Marra, M., & Holmes, J.
(2008) Impoliteness as a means of contesting power relations in the workplace. In D. Bousfield, & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (pp. 211–229). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Schwalbe, M. L., & Wolkomir, M.
(2003) Interviewing men. In J. A. Holtein, & J. F. Gubrium (Eds.), Inside interviewing: New lenses, new concerns (pp. 55–71). London and New Delhi: Sage Publications.
Sell, R. D.
(1992) Literary texts and diachronic aspects of politeness. In R. Watts, S. Ide, & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. 109–129).. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Sharp, I.
(2012) CultureShock! Australia: A survival guide to customs and etiquette. New York: Marshall Cavendish Editions.
Shei, C.
(2013) How ‘real’ is reality television in China? On the success of a Chinese dating programme. In N. Lorenzo-Dus, & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 43–65). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Silverman, D.
(2014 [1993]) Interpreting qualitative data. Los Angeles, London and New Delhi: Sage.
Silverstein, M.
(1993) Metapragmatic discourse and metapragmatic Function. In J. A. Lucy (Ed.), Reflexive language. Reported speech and metapragmatics (pp. 33–58). Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
Simpson, P.
(2011) “That’s not ironic, that’s just stupid”: Towards an eclectic account of the discourse of irony. In M. Dynel (Ed.), The pragmatics of humour across discourse domains (pp. 33–50). John Benjamins, Amsterdam. Crossref link
Sinkeviciute, V.
(2010) A comparative analysis of politeness in first encounter conversations in British English film and peninsular Spanish film. Lexis: Journal in English Lexicology, HS2, 71–93.
(2013) Decoding encoded (im)politeness: “Cause on my teasing you can depend”. In M. Dynel (Ed.), Developments in linguistic humour theory (pp. 263–288). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2014) “When a joke’s a joke and when it’s too much”: Mateship as a key to interpreting jocular FTAs in Australian English. Journal of Pragmatics, 60, 121–139. Crossref link
(2015) “There’s definitely gonna be some serious carnage in this house” or how to be genuinely impolite in Big Brother UK. Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict, 3(2), 317–348. Crossref link
(2016a) “It’s never meant to be offensive…”: An analysis of jocularity and (im)politeness in Australian and British cultural contexts. Unpublished PhD thesis. University of Antwerp.
(2016b) “Everything he says to me it’s like he stabs me in the face”: Frontstage and backstage reactions to teasing”. In N. Bell (Ed.), Multiple perspectives on language play (pp. 169–198). Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
(2017a) What makes teasing impolite in Australian and British English? “Step[ping] over those lines […] you shouldn’t be crossing”. Journal of Politeness Research, 13(2), 175–207. Crossref link
(2017b) Funniness and “the preferred reaction” to jocularity in Australian and British English: An analysis of interviewees’ metapragmatic comments. Language & Communication, 55, 41–54. Crossref link
(2017c) “It’s just a bit of cultural […] lost in translation”: Australian and British intracultural and intercultural metapragmatic evaluations of jocularity. Lingua, 197, 50–67. Crossref link
(2017d) Variability in group identity construction: A case study of the Australian and British Big Brother houses. Discourse, Context and Media, 20, 70–82. Crossref link
(in press). Juggling identities in interviews: The metapragmatics of ‘doing humour’. Journal of Pragmatics. https://​doi​.org​/10​.1016​/j​.pragma​.2018​.08​.005
Sinkeviciute, V., & Dynel, M.
(2017) Approaching conversational humour culturally: A survey of the emerging area of investigation. Language & Communication, 55, 1–9. Crossref link
Skalicki, S., Berger, C. M., & Bell, N. D.
(2015) The functions of “just kidding” in American English. Journal of Pragmatics, 85, 18–31. Crossref link
Sparks, C.
(2007) Reality TV: The Big Brother phenomenon. International Socialism, 114.
Spencer-Oatey, H.
(2000) Face, (im)politeness and rapport. In H. Spencer-Oatey (Ed.), Culturally speaking. Culture, communication and politeness theory (pp. 11–47). London and New York: Continuum.
(2002) Managing rapport in talk: Using rapport sensitive incidents to explore the motivational concerns underlying the management of relations. Journal of Pragmatics, 34(5), 529–545. Crossref link
(2005) (Im)politeness, face and perceptions of rapport: Unpackaging their bases and interrelationships. Journal of Politeness Research, 1, 95–119. Crossref link
(2011) Conceptualising ‘the relational’ in pragmatics: Insights from metapragmatic emotion and (im)politeness comments. Journal of Pragmatics, 43, 3565–3578. Crossref link
Stephens, A. G., & O’Brien, S. E.
(1910) Material for a Dictionary of Australian Slang. Unpublished manuscript.
Stollznow, K.
(2004) Whinger! Wowser! Wanker! Aussie English: Deprecatory language and the Australian ethos. Proceedings of the 2003 Conference of the Australian Linguistic Society.
Straehle, C.
(1993) ‘Samuel?’ ‘Yes, Dear?’ Teasing and conversational rapport. In D. Tannen (Ed.), Framing in discourse (pp. 210–230). New York: Oxford University Press.
Suls, J.
(1983) Cognitive processes in humor appreciation. In P. E. McGhee, & J. H. Goldstein (Eds.), Handbook of humor research 1 (pp. 39–57). New York: Springer-Verlag. Crossref link
Tan, T.
(2008) CultureShock! Great Britain: A survival guide to customs and etiquette. Tarrytown: Marshall Cavendish.
Taylor, C.
(2009) Mock politeness, Paper presented at Linguistic Politeness and Rudeness II (LIARII), Lancaster University, 30 June – 2 July 2009.
(2011) Negative politeness forms and impoliteness functions in institutional discourse: A corpus-assisted approach. In B. L. Davies, M. Haugh, & A. J. Merrison (Eds.), Situated politeness (pp. 209–231). London and New York: Continuum.
(2015a) Mock politeness in English and Italian: A corpus-assisted study of the metalanguage of sarcasm and irony. Lancaster University PhD dissertation.
(2015b) Beyond sarcasm: The metalanguage and structures of mock politeness. Journal of Pragmatics, 87, 127–141. Crossref link
(2016) Mock politeness in English and Italian. John Benjamins. Crossref link
Tedeschi, J. T., Smith, B. B., & Brown, R. C.
(1974) A reinterpretation of research on aggression. Psychological Bulletin, 81(9), 540–562. Crossref link
Terkourafi, M.
(2003) Generalised and particularised implicatures of linguistic politeness. In P. Kühnlein, H. Rieser, & H. Zeevat (Eds.), Perspectives on dialogue in the new millennium (pp. 149–164). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Crossref link
(2005) Beyond the micro-level in politeness research. Journal of Politeness Research, 1, 237–262. Crossref link
(2008) Toward a unified theory of politeness, impoliteness and rudeness. In D. Bousfield, & M. A. Locher (Eds.), Impoliteness in language: Studies on its interplay with power in theory and practice (?pp. 45–74). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
(2011) From politeness1 to politeness2: Tracking norms of im/politeness across time and space. Journal of Politeness Research, 7, 159–185. Crossref link
Terry, J.
(2007) New techniques for training and motivating your company’s multicultural management team. Employment Relations Today, 34(1), 37–45. Crossref link
The Lonely Planet guide to Australian language & culture (2013) Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd.
Thornborrow, J.
(2015) The discourse of public participation media: From talk show to Twitter. London: Routledge.
Thornborrow, J. & Morris, D.
(2004) Gossip as strategy: The management of talk about others on reality TV show ‘Big Brother’. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 8(2), 246–271. Crossref link
Tincknell, E., & Raghuram, P.
(2004) Big Brother: Reconstructing the ‘active’ audience of cultural studies? In S. Holmes, & D. Jermyn (Eds.), Understanding reality television (pp. 252–269). London and New York: Routledge.
Tolson, A.
(1991) Televised chat and the synthetic personality. In P. Scannell (Ed.), Broadcast talk (pp. 178–200). London, Newbury Part and New Delhi: Sage Publication.
(2006) Media talk: Spoken discourse on TV and radio. Edinburgh University Press.
(2013) Moments of truth: Telling it like it is on The Jeremy Kyle Show. In N. Lorenzo-Dus, & P. Garcés-Conejos Blitvich (Eds.), Real talk: Reality television and discourse analysis in action (pp. 266–287). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Crossref link
Tracy, K.
(2008) Reasonable Hostility: Situation-appropriate face-attack. Journal of Politeness Research, 4, 169–191. Crossref link
Tragesser, S. L., & Lippman, L. G.
(2005) Teasing: For superiority or solidarity? The Journal of General Psychology, 132(2), 255–266. Crossref link
Turner, G.
(2010) Ordinary people and the media. Los Angeles and London: SAGE.
van der Bom, I., & Mills, S.
(2015) A discursive approach to the analysis of politeness data. Journal of Politeness Research, 11(2), 179–206. Crossref link
van Zoonen, L.
(2004) Desire and resistance: Big Brother in the Dutch public sphere. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 16–24). London and New York: Wallflower Press.
Verschueren, J.
(1999) Understanding pragmatics. London: Arnold, New York: Oxford University Press.
(2004) Notes on the role of metapragmatic awareness in language. In A. Jaworski, N. Coupland & D. Galasiński (Eds.), Metalanguage. Social and ideological perspectives (pp. 53–73). Berlin, New York: Mouton de Gruyter. Crossref link
(2014) Plotting Meaning Landscapes. Lecture at the IPrA Forum, University of Antwerp, 21 March 2014.
Vincent Marrelli, J.
(1994) On non-serious talk: Some cross-cultural remarks on the (un)importance of (not) being earnest. In H. Parret (Ed.), Pretending to communicate (pp. 253–275). Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter. Crossref link
(2006 [2002]) Truthfullness. In J.-O. Östman & J. Verschueren (Eds.), Handbook of pragmatics (revision). Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, Crossref link
Voss, L. S.
(1997) Teasing, disputing, and playing: Cross-gender interactions and space utilization among first and third graders. Gender and Society, 11(2), 238–256. Crossref link
Walkinshaw, I.
(2016) Teasing in informal contexts in English as an Asian lingua franca. JELF, 5(2), 249–271. Crossref link
Watts, R. J.
(1989) Relevance and relational work: Linguistic politeness as politic behavior. Multilingua, 8(2/3), 131–166. Crossref link
(2003) Politeness. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Crossref link
(2005) Linguistic politeness research: Quo vadis? In R. Watts, S. Ide & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. xi–xlvii). Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, New York. Crossref link
Watts, R. J., Ide, S., & Ehlich, K.
(Eds.) (1992) Politeness in language. Studies in its history, theory and practice. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Wells, M.
(2001) There’s no such thing as reality tv. The Guardian. Available from http://​www​.theguardian​.com​/media​/2001​/nov​/05​/mondaymediasection​.bbc (accessed on 25 May 2016).
Wengraf, T.
(2001) Qualitative research interviewing: Biographic narrative and semi-structured methods. London and New Delhi: Sage Publications. Crossref link
Werkhofer, K. T.
(1992) Traditional and modern views: The social construction and the power of politeness. In R. Watts, S. Ide & K. Ehlich (Eds.), Politeness in language: Studies in its history, theory and practice (pp. 155–199). Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.
Wierzbicka, A.
(2002) Australian cultural scripts – bloody revisited. Journal of Pragmatics, 34, 1167–1209. Crossref link
Wilkinson, S., & Kitzinger, C.
(2006) Surprise as an interactional achievement: Reaction tokens in conversation. Social Psychology Quarterly, 69(2), 150–182. Crossref link
Wilson, P.
(2004) Jamming Big Brother USA: Webcasting, audience intervention and narrative activism. In E. Mathijs & J. Jones (Eds.), Big Brother international. Formats, critics and publics (pp. 194–209). Wallflower Press, London and New York.
Winterson Richards, J.
(2014) Xenophobe’s® guide to the Welsh. London: Xenophobe’s® Guides.
Xie, C, He, X., & Lin, D.
(2005) Politeness. Myth and truth. Studies in Language, 29(2), 431–461. Crossref link
Yu, C.
(2013) Two interactional functions of self-mockery in everyday English conversations: A multimodal analysis. Journal of Pragmatics, 50, 1–22. Crossref link
Zajdman, A.
(1995) Humorous face-threatening acts: Humor as strategy. Journal of Pragmatics, 23, 325–339. Crossref link
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2019028750