Corpus-based Analysis and Diachronic Linguistics

Editors
| Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
| Tokyo University of Foreign Studies
| University of Bamberg
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027207708 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027272157 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Nowadays, linguists do not question the existence of synchronic variation, and the dichotomy between synchrony and diachrony. They recognize that synchrony can be motivated regionally (diatopic variation), sociolinguistically (diastratic variation), or stylistically (diaphasic variation). But, further, they can also recognize the hybrid nature of synchrony, which is referred to as "dynamic synchrony." This conception of synchrony assumes that similar patterns of usage can coexist in a community during a certain period and that their mutual relations are not static but conflicting enough to result in a future systematic change through symptomatic synchronic variation. Emergence of a large corpus of written texts for some languages has enabled quantitative as well as qualitative analyses of the synchronic conditions for diachronic changes, over both long and short spans of time. Most of the 14 papers in this volume represent studies on synchronic and diachronic variations based on such corpus data.

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[Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, 3]  2011.  vi, 293 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Message from the President
Ikuo Kameyama
1–2
Center for Corpus-based Linguistics and Language Education
Makoto Minegishi
3–5
Introduction
Yuji Kawaguchi, Wolfgang Viereck and Makoto Minegishi
7–19
The Atlas Linguarum Europae: A diachronic analysis of its data
Wolfgang Viereck
21–36
Variationism and underuse statistics in the analysis of the development of relative clauses in German
Anke Lüdeling, Hagen Hirschmann and Amir Zeldes
37–57
Variation and change in the Montferrand Account-books (1259-1367)
R. Anthony Lodge
59–74
Cognitive aspects of language evolution and language change: The example of French historical texts
Wolfgang Raible
75–89
The importance of diasystematic parameters in studying the history of French
Lene Schøsler
91–109
The reorganisation of mood in the epistemic subsystem – The case of French belief predicates in diachronic dynamics
Martin G. Becker
111–131
French liaison in the 18th Century – Analysis of Gile Vaudelin's texts
Yuji Kawaguchi
133–151
Issues in the typographic representation of medieval primary sources
António Emiliano
153–173
An analysis of the misuse of the participle in old Russian texts
Yoshinori Onda
175–188
A preliminary analysis of Arabic derived verbs in the Leeds Quran Corpus – With special reference to Stem III (CaaCaC)
Robert R. Ratcliffe
189–201
On the narrow and open "e" contrast in Santali
Makoto Minegishi, Jun Takashima and Ganesh Murmu
203–222
The classification of Apabhramśa – A corpus-based approach of the study of Middle Indo-Aryan
Tomoyuki Yamahata
223–241
Changes in the meaning and construction of Polysemous words: The case of mieru and mirareru
Ayako Shiba
243–264
Language change from the viewpoint of distribution patterns of standard Japanese forms
Kanetaka Yarimizu
265–284
Index of proper nouns
285–288
Index of subjects
289–292
Contributors
293
Subjects
BIC Subject: CFF – Historical & comparative linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011045661