The Linguistic Structure of Modern English

| University of British Columbia
| University of Southern California
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027211712 | EUR 105.00 | USD 158.00
 
PaperbackAvailable
ISBN 9789027211729 | EUR 33.00 | USD 49.95
 
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ISBN 9789027288240 | EUR 105.00/33.00*
| USD 158.00/49.95*
 

This text is for advanced undergraduate and graduate students interested in contemporary English, especially those whose primary area of interest is English as a second language, primary or secondary-school education, English stylistics, theoretical and applied linguistics, or speech pathology. The emphasis is on empirical facts of English rather than any particular theory of linguistics; the text does not assume any background in language or linguistics. In this newly revised edition numerous example sentences are taken from the Corpus of Contemporary American English. A full glossary of key terms, an additional chapter on pedagogy and new sections on cognitive semantics and politeness have been added. Other changes include: completely updated print references; web links to sites of special interest and relevance; and a revised, reader-friendly layout. A companion website that includes a complete workbook with self-testing exercises and a comprehensive list of web links accompanies the book. The website can be found at the following address: https://doi.org/10.1075/z.156.workbook.

Students completing the text and workbook will acquire: a knowledge of the sound system of contemporary English; an understanding of the formation of English words; a comprehension of the structure of both simple and complex sentence in English; a recognition of complexities in the expression of meaning; an understanding of the context and function of use upon the structure of the language; and an appreciation of the importance of linguistic knowledge to the teaching of English to first and second-language learners.

Laurel J. Brinton is Professor of English Language at the University of British Columbia.

Donna M. Brinton is Senior Lecturer in TESOL at the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education.

The Linguistic Structure of Modern English is a revised edition of The Structure of Modern English by Laurel J. Brinton (2000).

This title replaces The Structure of Modern English: A linguistic introduction (2000)

[Not in series, 156]  2010.  xx, 426 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface to the second edition
i–xx
Chapter 1. The nature of language and linguistics
1–15
Chapter 2. Consonants and vowels
16–49
Chapter 3. Phonology, phonotactics, and suprasegmentals
50–78
Chapter 4. The internal structure of words and processes of word formation
79–112
Chapter 5. Grammatical categories and word classes
113–142
Chapter 6. Lexical semantics
143–183
Chapter 7. Phrasal structure and verb complementation
184–215
Chapter 8. Adverbials, auxiliaries, and sentence types
216–242
Chapter 9. Finite and nonfinite clauses
243–293
Chapter 10. Sentence semantics
294–323
Chapter 11. Information structuring and speech acts
324–355
Chapter 12. Linguistics in language teaching
Howard Williams
356–384
References
385–392
Glossary
393–415
Appendices
416–419
“We are not really educated until we understand the language in which we speak, write, and think. No one can work with language or literature who does not know how language works. Laurel Brinton’s textbook The Structure of Modern English tells how the English language works, and does so with clarity, comprehensiveness, and interest. This is a first-rate introduction to the most basic of human abilities and the most important of human capacities: language. It involves its reader with a skillful system of self-correcting exercises on CD-ROM. This is a linguistic textbook for the 21st century.”
“As somebody who has been experimenting with finding the ideal textbook for classes on the structure of English for about ten years, I truly welcome Brinton's contribution to this genre. Brinton's textbook is unique in its combination of density and breadth of topics, lecture style and self-assessment, and its richness of data from contemporary English.”
Erratum

Erratum Tables 8.1 & 8.2

Please find here Tables 8.1 & 8.2 as they should appear on pages 225 and 228.


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BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
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