Agrammatic Aphasia

A cross-language narrative sourcebook

Editors
| University of Colorado
| CUNY and Boston VA Medical Center
Associate Editor
| Università Cattolica, Rome
Editorial Associate
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027220455 (Eur) | EUR 828.00
ISBN 9781556190247 (USA) | USD 1242.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027273512 | EUR 828.00 | USD 1242.00
 
This major reference work fills a need long recognized in neurolinguistics: a source for analyzable speech transcripts from agrammatic aphasic patients that provides detailed grammatical descriptions and distributional analyses. This 3-volume set is unique in that it presents narrative speech from carefully selected clinically comparable patients, speakers of 14 languages, and parallel narratives by normal speakers. For each of the 14 languages there is a case presentation chapter analyzing and discussing the language of agrammatic patients, followed by primary data, which are organized as follows: running text of speech by two patients; interlinear morphemic translations of those texts; running text of speech elicited from two normal control subjects (plus interlinear translations); tables and figures analyzing distributional properties of the patients' speech; results of comprehension tests of the patients; transcriptions of patients' oral reading and writing samples. Neurological information is included with the case presentations, and a short grammatical sketch of each language is added to make the work on all languages accessible even to those who only read English. Language findings are presented for English, Dutch, German, Icelandic, Swedish, French, Italian, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Hindi, Finnish, Hebrew, Chinese and Japanese.The book is an indispensable reference work for all linguists, psycholinguists and neurolinguists who wish to test their theories against a massive body of data.
[Not in series, 39]  1989.  xxvii, 1985 pp., 3 Vols.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Contributors and affiliation
xv–xvii
Acknowledgments
xix–xx
Abbreviations
xxi–xxiii
Preface
Rita Sloan Berndt
xxv–xxvii
I. Orientation
Chapter 1. Theoretical motivations for the cross-language study of agrammatism
Lise Menn and Loraine K. Obler
3–12
Chapter 2. Methodology: Data collection, presentation, and guide to interpretation
Lise Menn and Loraine K. Obler
13–36
Chapter 3. CT-Scan correlates of agrammatism
Marie Vanier and David Caplan
37–114
II. Language findings and data
Chapter 4. Agrammatism in English: Two case studies
Lise Menn
117–178
Chapter 5. Agrammatism in Dutch: Two case studies
Herman Kolk, Geert Heling and Antoine Keyser
179–280
Chapter 6. Agrammatism in German: Two case studies
Jacqueline Ann Stark and Wolfgang U. Dressler
281–441
Chapter 7. Agrammatism in Icelandic: Two case studies
Sigriður Magnúsdóttir and Höskuldur Tháinsson
443–543
Chapter 8. Agrammatism in Swedish: Two case studies
Elisabeth Ahlsén and Christina Dravins
545–621
Chapter 9. Agrammatism in French: Two case studies
Jean-Luc Nespoulous, Monique Dordain, Cécile Perron, Gonia Jarema and Marianne Chazal
623–716
Chapter 10. Agrammatism in Italian: Two case studies
Gabriele Miceli and Anna Mazzucchi
717–816
Chapter 11. Agrammatism in Polish: A case study
Gonia Jarema and Danuta Kądzielawa
817–893
Chapter 12. Agrammatism in Serbo-Croatian: Two case studies
Branka Zei and Neven Šikić
895–974
Chapter 13. Agrammatism in Hindi: A case study
Subhash C. Bhatnagar
975–1011
Chapter 14. Agrammatism in Finnish: Two case studies
Jussi Niemi, Matti Laine, Ritva Hänninen and Päiva Koivuselkä-Sallinen
1013–1085
Chapter 15. Agrammatism in Hebrew: Two case studies
Eva Baharav
1087–1190
Chapter 16. Agrammatism in Chinese: A case study
Jerome Packard
1191–1223
Chapter 17. Agrammatism in Japanese: Two case studies
Sumiko Sasanuma, Akio Kamio and Masahito Kubota
1225–1307
Chapter 17A. Crossed agrammatism in Japanese: A case study
Sumiko Sasanuma, Akio Kamio and Masahito Kubota
1309–1353
III. Language comparisons and conclusions
Chapter 18. Word order in the Germanic Languages — Subject-verb or verb second?: Evidence from aphasia in Scandinavian languages
Bernard Comrie
1357–1364
Chapter 19. Inferences from cross-modal comparisons of agrammatism
Harold Goodglass
1365–1368
Chapter 20. Cross-language data and theories of agrammatism
Lise Menn and Loraine K. Obler
1369–1389
Supplement to Chapter 4. English-language materials
Lise Menn
1391–1411
Supplement to Chapter 5. Dutch-language materials
Herman Kolk, Geert Heling and Antoine Keyser
1413–1455
Supplement to Chapter 6. German-language materials
Jacqueline Ann Stark and Wolfgang U. Dressler
1457–1547
Supplement to Chapter 7. Icelandic-language materials
Sigriður Magnúsdóttir and Höskuldur Thráinsson
1549–1587
Supplement to Chapter 8. Swedish-language materials
Elisabeth Ahlsén and Christina Dravins
1589–1620
Supplement to Chapter 9. French-language materials
Jean-Luc Nespoulous, Monique Dordain, Cécile Perron, Gonia Jarema and Marianne Chazal
1621–1665
Supplement to Chapter 10. Italian-language materials
Gabriele Miceli and Anna Mazzucchi
1667–1693
Supplement to Chapter 11. Polish-language materials
Gonia Jarema and Danuta Kądzielawa
1695–1715
Supplement to Chapter 12. Serbo-Croatian materials
Branka Zei and Neven Šikić
1717–1760
Supplement to chapler 13. Hindi materials
Subhash C. Bhatnagar
1761–1773
Supplement to Chapter 14. Finnish-language materials
Jussi Niemi, Matti Laine, Ritva Hänninen and Päiva Koivuselkä-Sallinen
1775–1818
Supplement to Chapter 15. Hebrew materials
Eva Baharav
1819–1844
Supplement to Chapter 16. Chinese-language materials
Jerome Packard
1845–1855
Supplement to Chapter 17. Japanese-language materials
Sumiko Sasanuma, Akio Kamio and Masahito Kubota
1857–1906
Supplement to Chapter 17A. Japanese-language materials appendix
Sumiko Sasanuma, Akio Kamio and Masahito Kubota
1907–1924
References
1925–1946
Index of subjects
1947–1980
Index of authorities
1981–1985
Cited by

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PROTOPAPAS, ATHANASSIOS, SPYRIDOULA CHEIMARIOU, ALEXANDRA ECONOMOU, MARIA KAKAVOULIA & SPYRIDOULA VARLOKOSTA
2016. Functional categories related to verb inflection are not differentially impaired in Greek aphasia. Language and Cognition 8:1  pp. 124 ff. Crossref logo
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U., Venkataraja Aithal, Veena K. D., Gilu James & Rajashekhar B.
2009. Morphosyntactic Deficits in Malayalam-Speaking Broca's Aphasics. Asia Pacific Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing 12:4  pp. 303 ff. Crossref logo
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1996. Patterns of grammatical disruption in Cantonese aphasic subjects. Asia Pacific Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing 1:2  pp. 105 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 28 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  89018418 | Marc record