References

References

Ammar, A.
(2008) Prompts and recasts: Differential effects on second language morphosyntax. Language Teaching Research, 12, 183–210. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Baddeley, A. D.
(2007) Working memory, thought, and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bandura, A.
(1986) Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Biedroń, A.
(2011) Personality factors as predictors of foreign language aptitude. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 1, 467–489. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Biedroń, A., & Pawlak, M.
(2016) New conceptualizations of linguistic giftedness. Language Teaching, 49, 151–186. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Carroll, J. B.
(1959) Use of the Modern Language Aptitude Test in secondary schools. Yearbook of the National Council on Measurements Used in Education, 16, 155–159.Google Scholar
(1981) Twenty-five years of research on foreign language aptitude. In K. C. Diller (Ed.), Individual differences and universals in language learning aptitude (pp. 83–118). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. D.
(2010) Focus on the language learner: Styles, strategies and motivation. In N. Schmitt (Ed.), An introduction to applied linguistics (2nd ed., pp. 161–178). London. Hodder Education.Google Scholar
(2014) Strategies in learning and using a second language. (2nd ed.) New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. D., & Griffiths, C.
(2015) Revisiting LLS research forty years later. TESOL Quarterly, 49, 414–229. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, A. D., Oxford, R. L., & Chi, J. C.
De Costa, P. I.
(2015) Re-envisioning language anxiety in the globalized classroom through a social imaginary lens. Language Learning, 65, 504–532. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
DeKeyser, R. M.
(2014) Age effects in second language learning. In S. M. Gass & A. Mackey (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 442–460). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Denies, K., Yashima, T., & Janssen, R.
(2015) Classroom versus societal willingness to communicate: Investigating French as a second language in Flanders. Modern Language Journal, 99, 718–739. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dewaele, J. M.
(2004) Individual differences in the use of colloquial vocabulary: The effects of sociobiological and psychological factors. In P. Bogaards, & B. Laufer (Eds.), Vocabulary in a second language: Selection, acquisition, and testing (pp. 127–153). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dewaele, J. M. & Al-Saraj, T. M.
(2015) Foreign language classroom anxiety of Arab learners of English: The effect of personality, linguistic and sociobiographical variables. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 5, 205–228. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dewaele, J. M., MacIntyre, P. M., Boudreau, C., & Dewaele, L.
(2016) Do girls have all the fun? Anxiety and enjoyment in the foreign language classroom. Theory and Practice of Second Language Acquisition, 2, 41–63.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z.
(2005) The psychology of the language learner: Individual differences in second language acquisition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
(2009a) The psychology of second language acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
(2009b) The L2 motivational self system. In Z. Dörnyei & E. Ushioda (Eds.), Motivation, language identity, and the self (pp. 9–42). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
(2014) Researching complex dynamic systems: ‘Retrodictive qualitative modelling’ in the language classroom. Language Teaching, 47, 80–91.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z., MacIntyre, P. D., & Henry, A.
(Eds.) (2015) Motivational dynamics in language learning. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Dörnyei, Z., & Ryan, S.
(2015) The psychology of the language learner revisited. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Ehrman, M. E., & Leaver, B. L.
(2003) Cognitive styles in the service of language learning. System, 31, 391–415. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R.
(2007) Implicit and explicit learning, knowledge, and instruction. In R. Ellis, S. Loewen, C. Elder, J. Philp, H. Reinders, and R. Erlam (Eds.), Implicit and explicit knowledge in second language learning, testing, and teaching (pp. 3–25). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
(2008) The study of second language acquisition (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
(2010) Epilogue: A framework for investigating oral and written corrective feedback. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 32, 335–349. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2015) Form-focused approaches to learning, teaching, and researching grammar. In M. A. Christison, D. Christian, P. A. Duff, & N. Spada (Eds.), Teaching and learning English grammar: Research findings and future directions (pp. 194–213). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Ellis, R., Basturkmen, H., & Loewen, S.
(2001) Learner uptake in communicative ESL lessons. Language Learning, 51, 281–318. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2002) Doing focus on form. System, 30, 419–432. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gass, S. M., Behney, J. N., & Uzum, B.
(2013) Inhibitory control, working memory and L2 interaction. In K. Droździał-Szelest & M. Pawlak (Eds.), Psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic perspectives on second language learning and teaching. Studies in honor of Waldemar Marton (pp. 91–114). Heidelberg: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gass, S. M., & Mackey, A.
(2015) Input, interaction, and output in second language acquisition. In B. VanPatten & J. Williams (Eds.), Theories in second language acquisition (2nd ed., pp. 175–199). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Gass, S. M., & Varonis, E.
(1986) Sex differences in NNS/NNS interactions. In R. R. Day (Ed.), Talking to learn: Conversation in second language acquisition (pp. 327–351). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Goo, J.
(2012) Corrective feedback and working memory capacity in interaction-driven L2 learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 34, 445–474. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gregersen, T., & MacIntyre, P.
(2014) Capitalizing on language learners’ individuality: From premise to practice. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Griffiths, C.
(2012) Learning styles: Traversing the quagmire. In S. Mercer, S. Ryan, & M. Williams (Eds.), Psychology for language learning (pp. 151–168). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2013) The strategy factor in successful language learning. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Havranek, G.
(2002) When is corrective feedback most likely to succeed? International Journal of Educational Research, 37, 225–270. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, J.
(1998) Complimenting a positive politeness strategy. In J. Coates (Ed.), Language and gender: A reader (pp. 100–112). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Horwitz, E. K.
(1988) The beliefs about language learning of beginning university foreign language students. Modern Language Journal, 72, 283–294. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Horwitz, E. K., Horwitz, M., & Hope, J. M.
(1986) Foreign language classroom anxiety. Modern Language Journal, 70, 125–132. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ishida, M.
(2004) Effects of recasts on the acquisition of the aspectual form ‘-te i-(ru)’ by learners of Japanese as a foreign language. Language Learning, 54, 311–394. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kalaja, P.
(2016) Key issues relevant to the studies to be reported: Beliefs, agency, and identity. In P. Kalaja, A. M. F. Barcelos, M. Aro, & M. Ruohotie-Lyhty (Eds.), Beliefs, agency and identity in foreign language learning and teaching (pp. 8–24). New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Kalaja, P., & Barcelos, A. M. F.
(Eds.) (2003) Beliefs about SLA: New research approaches. Dordrecht: Kluwer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kowal, M., & Swain, M.
(1994) Using collaborative language production tasks to promote students ‘language awareness’. Language Awareness, 3, 73–93. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Larsen-Freeman, D., & Cameron, L.
(2008) Complex systems and applied linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Li, S.
(2014) The interface between feedback type, L2 proficiency, and the nature of linguistic target. Language Teaching Research, 18, 373–396. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Loewen, S.
(2011) Focus on form. In E. Hinkel (Ed.), Handbook of research in second language learning and teaching. (Vol. 2, pp. 576–592). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
(2014) Instructed second language acquisition. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Loewen, S., & Erlam, R. M.
(2006) Corrective feedback in the chat room: An experimental study. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 19, 1–14. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Long, M. H.
(1983) Linguistic and conversational adjustments to non-native speakers. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 5, 177–193. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(1996) The role of the linguistic environment in second language acquisition. In W. C. Ritchie & T. K. Bhatia (Eds.), Handbook of research on second language acquisition (Vol. 2, pp. 413–468). New York, NY: Academy Press.Google Scholar
(2013) Maturational constraints on child and adult SLA. In G. Granena & M. H. Long (Eds.), Sensitive periods, language aptitude, and ultimate L2 attainment (pp. 3–41). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
MacIntyre, P. D.
(2007) Willingness to communicate in the second language: Understanding the decision to speak as a volitional process. Modern Language Journal, 91, 564–576. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
MacIntyre, P. M., & Gardner, R. C.
(1994) The subtle effects of language anxiety on cognitive processing in the second language. Language Learning, 44, 283–305. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
MacIntyre, P. D., & Legatto, J. J.
(2011) A dynamic system approach to willingness to communicate: Developing an idiodynamic method to capture rapidly changing affect. Applied Linguistics, 32, 149–171. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A.
(2012) Input, interaction, and corrective feedback in L2 learning. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Mackey, A., Abbuhl, R., & Gass, S. M.
(2014) Interactionist approach. In S. M. Gass & A. Mackey (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 7–23). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Mackey, A., Adams, R., Stafford, C. & Winke, P.
(2010) Exploring the relationship between modified output and working memory capacity. Language Learning, 60, 501–533. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., Oliver, R., & Leeman, J.
(2003) Interactional input and the incorporation of feedback: An exploration of NS-NNS and NNS-NNS adult and child dyads. Language Learning, 53, 35–66. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., & Philp, J.
(1998) Conversational interaction and second language development: Recasts, responses, and red herrings? Modern Language Journal, 82, 338–356. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., Philp, J., Egi, T., Fujii, A. & Tatsumi, T.
(2002) Individual differences in working memory, noticing of interactional feedback, and L2 development. In P. Robinson (Ed.), Cognition and second language instruction (pp. 181–209). Cambridge: Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
Mackey, A., & Polio, C.
(2009) Introduction. In A. Mackey & C. Polio (Eds.), Multiple perspectives on interaction: Second language research in honor of Susan M. Gass (pp. 1–10). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Mackey, A., & Sachs, R.
(2011) Older learners in SLA research: A first look at working memory, feedback, and L2 development. Language Learning, 62, 1–37.Google Scholar
McCrea, R. R., & Costa, P. T.
(2003) Personality in adulthood: A five-factor theory perspective (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
McDonough, K., & Mackey, A.
(2006) Responses to recasts: Repetition, primed production, and language development. Language Learning, 56, 693–720. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mercer, S.
(2012) Dispelling the myth of the natural-born linguist. ELT Journal, 66, 22–29. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Pawlak, M.
(2017) Willingness to communicate in instructed second language acquisition: Combining a macro- and micro-perspective. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Nagata, N.
(1993) Intelligent computer feedback for second language instruction. Modern Language Journal, 77, 330–339. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nakatani, Y., & Goh, C.
(2007) A review of oral communication strategies: Focus on interactionist and psycholinguistic perspectives. In A. D. Cohen & E. Macaro (Eds.), Language learner strategies: Thirty years of research and practice (pp. 207–227). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nassaji, H.
(2015) The interactional feedback dimension in instructed second language learning. Linking theory, research, and practice. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Oliver, R.
(2000) Age differences in negotiation and feedback in classroom and pairwork. Language Learning, 50, 119–151. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2002) The patterns of negotiation of meaning in child interactions. Modern Language Journal, 86, 97–111. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Oxford, R. L.
(1990) Language learning strategies. What every teacher should know. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.Google Scholar
(1999) Style wars as a source of anxiety in language classrooms. In D. J. Young (Ed.), Affect in second language learning: A practical guide to dealing with language anxiety (pp. 216–237). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
(2001) Language learning styles and strategies. In M. Celce-Murcia (Ed.), Teaching English as a second or foreign language (3rd ed., pp. 369–366). Boston, MA: Heine & Heinle.Google Scholar
(2011) Teaching and researching language learning strategies. New York, NY: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
(2017) Teaching and researching language learning strategies. Self-regulation in context. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Papi, M., & Teimouri, Y.
(2014) Language learner motivational types: A cluster analysis study. Language Learning, 64, 493–525. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pawlak, M.
(2012a) Individual differences in language learning and teaching: Achievements, prospects and challenges. In M. Pawlak (Ed.), New perspectives on individual differences in language learning and teaching (pp. xix–xlvi). Heidelberg: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012b) The dynamic nature of motivation in language learning: A classroom perspective. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 2, 249–278. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2013a) Comparing learners’ and teachers’ beliefs about form-focused instruction. In D. Gabryś-Barker, E. Piechurska-Kuciel, & J. Zybert (Eds.), Investigations in teaching and learning languages: Studies in honor of Hanna Komorowska (pp. 109–131). Heidelberg: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2013b) Researching grammar learning strategies: Combining the macro- and micro-perspective. In Ł. Salski, W. Szubko-Sitarek, & J. Majer (Eds.), Perspectives on foreign language learning (pp. 191–210). Łódź: University of Łódź Press.Google Scholar
(2015, March). Willingness to communicate as a factor influencing the effectiveness of input-providing and output-prompting oral corrective feedback. Paper presented at the American Association for Applied Linguistics Conference, Toronto.
Pawlak, M., Mystkowska-Wiertelak, A., & Bielak, J.
(2016) Investigating the nature of classroom WTC: A micro-perspective. Language Teaching Research, 20, 654–671. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pfenninger, S. E.
(2014) The misunderstood variable: Age effects as a function of type of instruction. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 4, 529–556. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pica, T., & Doughty, C.
(1985) Input and interaction in the communicative language classroom: A comparison of teacher-fronted and group activities. In S. M. Gass & C. Madden (Eds.), Input in second language acquisition (pp. 115–32). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Pica, T., Holliday, L., Lewis, N., & Morgenthaller, L.
(1989) Comprehensible output as an outcome of linguistic demands on the learner. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 11, 63–90. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Piechurska-Kuciel, E.
(2008) Language anxiety in secondary grammar school students. Opole: University of Opole Press.Google Scholar
Pienemann, M.
(2015) Processability theory. In B. VanPatten & J. Williams (Eds.), Theories in second language acquisition (2nd ed., pp. 159–179). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Piniel, K., & Csizér, K.
(2013) L2 motivation, anxiety and self-efficacy: The interrelationship of individual variables in the secondary school context. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching, 3, 523–550. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Plonsky, L.
(2011) The effectiveness of second language strategy instruction. Language Learning, 61, 993–1038. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Porter, P.
(1986) How learners talk to each other: Input and interaction in task-centered discussions. In R. R. Day (Ed.), Talking to learn: Conversation in second language acquisition (pp. 200–222). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
Rassaei, E.
(2015) Recasts, field dependence-independence cognitive style, and L2 development. Language Teaching Research, 19, 499–518. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, L., & Meyer, A.
(2012) Individual differences in second language learning: Introduction. Language Learning, 62(Suppl. 2), 1–4. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Robinson, P.
(2002) Learning conditions, aptitude complexes and SLA: A framework for research and pedagogy. In P. Robinson (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 113–133). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Rose, H. L.
(2012) Reconceptualizing strategic learning in the face of self-regulation: Throwing language learning strategies out with the bathwater. Applied Linguistics, 33, 92–98. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ross-Feldman, L.
(2007) Interaction in the L2 classroom: Does gender influence learning opportunities? In A. Mackey (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition (pp. 53–77). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Rubin, J.
(1975) What the ‘good language learner’ can teach us. TESOL Quarterly, 9, 41–51. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Rubin, J., Chamot, A. U., Harris, V., & Anderson, N. J.
(2007) Intervening in the use of strategies. In A. D. Cohen & E. Macaro (Eds.). Language learner strategies: Thirty years of research and practice (pp. 141–160). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sagarra, N.
(2007) From CALL to face-to-face interaction: The effect of computer-delivered recasts and working memory on L2 development. In A. Mackey (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition (pp. 229–248). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sagarra, N., & Abbuhl, R.
(2013) Optimizing the noticing of recasts via computer-delivered feedback: Evidence that oral input enhancement and working memory help second language learning. Modern Language Journal, 97, 196–216. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sheen, Y.
(2007) The effect of corrective feedback, language aptitude, and learner attitudes on the acquisition of English articles. In A. Mackey (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition (pp. 301–322). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
(2008) Recasts, language anxiety, modified output, and L2 learning. Language Learning, 58, 835–874. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Shin, S. Y., Lidster, R., Sabra, S., & Yeager, R.
(2016) The effects of L2 proficiency differences in pairs on idea units in a collaborative text reconstruction task. Language Teaching Research, 20, 366–386. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Singleton, D.
(2016) CPH theory, early classroom instruction and age-related issues that are separable from age. In M. Pawlak (Ed.), Classroom-oriented research: Reconciling theory and practice (pp. 213–241). Heidelberg: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Skehan, P.
(2002) Theorizing and updating aptitude. In P. Robinson (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 69–95). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012) Language aptitude. In S. M. Gass & A. Mackey (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 381–395). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Sternberg, R. J.
(2002) The theory of successful intelligence and its implications for language aptitude testing. In P. Robinson (Ed.), Individual differences and instructed language learning (pp. 13–43). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Swain, M.
(1985) Communicative competence: Some roles of comprehensible input and comprehensible output in its development. In S. M. Gass & C. G. Madden (Eds.), Input in second language acquisition (pp. 235–253). Rowley, MA: Newbury House.Google Scholar
(2005) The output hypothesis: Theory and research. In E. Hinkel (Ed.), Handbook of research in second language teaching and learning (pp. 471–483). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Tannen, D.
(1990) You just don’t understand. Women and men in conversation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tavakoli, M., & Zarrinabadi, N.
(2016) Differential effects of explicit and implicit corrective feedback on EFL learners’ willingness to communicate. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 10, 1–13. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Teimouri, Y.
(2016) L2 selves, emotions, and motivated behaviors. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1–29. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Trofimovich, P., Ammar, A., & Gatbonton, E.
(2007) How effective are recasts? The role of attention, memory, and analytical ability. In A. Mackey (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition (pp. 171–195). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Vandergrift, L., Goh, C., Mareschal, C., & Tafaghodtari, M. H.
(2006) The Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ): Development and validation. Language Learning, 56, 431–462. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Varnosfadrani, A. D., Basturkmen, H.
(2009) The effectiveness of implicit and explicit error correction on learners’ performance. System, 37, 82–98. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Vatz, K., Tare, M., Jackson, S. R., & Doughty, C. J.
(2013) Aptitude-treatment interaction studies in second language acquisition: Findings and methodology. In G. Granena & M. H. Long (Eds.), Sensitive periods, language aptitude, and ultimate L2 attainment (pp. 272–292). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wen, Z.
(2014) Theorizing and measuring working memory in first and second language research. Language Teaching, 47, 174–190. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Williams, J. N.
(2014) Working memory and SLA. In S. M. Gass & A. Mackey (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 427–441). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Williams, M., Mercer, S., & Ryan, S.
(2015) Exploring psychology in language learning and teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Yule, G., & McDonald, D.
(1990) Resolving referential conflicts in L2 interaction: The effect of proficiency and interactive role. Language Learning, 40, 539–56. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 7 other publications

Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura
2020.  In Cross-theoretical Explorations of Interlocutors and their Individual Differences [Language Learning & Language Teaching, 53],  pp. 4 ff. Crossref logo
Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura
2020.  In Cross-theoretical Explorations of Interlocutors and their Individual Differences [Language Learning & Language Teaching, 53],  pp. 248 ff. Crossref logo
Pawlak, Miroslaw
2020.  In Cross-theoretical Explorations of Interlocutors and their Individual Differences [Language Learning & Language Teaching, 53],  pp. 52 ff. Crossref logo
Pawlak, Mirosław
2019. Investigating language learning strategies: Prospects, pitfalls and challenges. Language Teaching Research  pp. 136216881987615 ff. Crossref logo
Pawlak, Mirosław, Mariusz Kruk & Joanna Zawodniak
2020. Investigating individual trajectories in experiencing boredom in the language classroom: The case of 11 Polish students of English. Language Teaching Research  pp. 136216882091400 ff. Crossref logo
Pawlak, Mirosław, Joanna Zawodniak & Mariusz Kruk
2020. The neglected emotion of boredom in teaching English to advanced learners. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 30:3  pp. 497 ff. Crossref logo
Ruiz, Simón, Patrick Rebuschat & Detmar Meurers
2019. The effects of working memory and declarative memory on instructed second language vocabulary learning: Insights from intelligent CALL. Language Teaching Research  pp. 136216881987285 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 april 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.