Becoming Human

From pointing gestures to syntax

| University of Sevilla
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027252173 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027286796 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
What do the pointing gesture, the imitation of new complex motor patterns, the evocation of absent objects and the grasping of others’ false beliefs all have in common? Apart from being (one way or other) involved in the language, they all would share a demanding requirement – a second mental centre within the subject. This redefinition of the simulationism is extended in the present book in two directions. Firstly, mirror-neurons and, likewise, animal abilities connected with the visual field of their fellows, although they certainly constitute important landmarks, would not require this second mental centre. Secondly, others’ beliefs would have given rise not only to predicative communicative function but also to pre-grammatical syntax. The inquiry about the evolutionary-historic origin of language focuses on the cognitive requirements on it as a faculty (but not to the indirect causes such as environmental changes or greater co-operation), pays attention to children, and covers other human peculiarities as well, e.g., symbolic play, protodeclaratives, self-conscious emotions, and interactional or four-hand tasks.
[Advances in Consciousness Research, 81]  2011.  xvii, 402 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
1–10
Section one. Evolutionary precursors
11–12
Chapter 1. Monkeys’ mirror neurons
13–36
Chapter 2. Chimpanzees and the visual field of the conspecific
37–46
Section two. The basic human ability
47–48
Chapter 3. The three modes of processing the eyes of others
49–60
Chapter 4. Pointing gestures
61–78
Chapter 5. Four-hand co-operative actions and children’s interpersonal co-ordination games
79–88
Section three. Specifying some necessary requisites of language
89–90
Chapter 6. Saussurean parity and the perception of a radically not-own self
91–104
Chapter 7. About evocation
105–112
Chapter 8. Symbolic play: Developments in the simulatory centre
113–136
Chapter 9. From symbolic play to linguistic symbol
137–158
Section four. The origin of predication and syntax
159–160
Chapter 10. From the general exposition to the crucial requisite achieved by the protodeclarative
161–176
Chapter 11. Toward the original perception of false beliefs of others: The importance of the learned sign
177–188
Chapter 12. Between motor learning and the perception of beliefs of others: The crucial role of the protodeclarative
189–202
Section five. Pregrammatical, theme-rheme syntax
203–204
Chapter 13. From beliefs of others to communicative predication
205–218
Chapter 14. Revisiting Frege: How can a predication be at one and the same time true and not redundant?
219–228
Chapter 15. Communicative functions, Vygotskian ‘pure predicate’ and conceptual semantics: Various questions about predication
229–238
Chapter 16. Connecting with the concepts of theme (or topic) and rheme (or comment)
239–254
Section six. From original to present-day predication
255–256
Chapter 17. Meaning and the different types of link
257–270
Chapter 18. Expressive speech and syntactic links: A hypothesis on the historic origins of those links, and on some other questions, along the way
271–302
Chapter 19. Historical grammaticalisation: The answers are lacking, but the questions are good
303–314
Section seven. Syntax beyond predication
315–316
Chapter 20. Interrogative communication
317–336
Chapter 21. Toward complex syntax: The crucial role of reported speech
337–358
Preliminary conclusion and the main thesis recapitulated
359–362
References
363–390
Glossary
391–394
Author index
395–400
Subject index
401–402
“Teresa Bejarano [...] is thoroughly familiar with the literature on language, developmental psychology, and primate behavior. She argues that the special qualities of the human mind depend on the emergence of what she calls a second center that confers the ability to simulate the minds of others [...]. I think second center, at least in Bejarano's treatment, offers more theoretical mileage than do these other concepts—working memory, imitation, recursion [...]. I can thoroughly recommend this stimulating book.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

van Breda, Ward, Jan Treur & Arlette van Wissen
2012.  In Social Informatics [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 7710],  pp. 275 ff. Crossref logo

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Subjects

Consciousness Research

Consciousness research
BIC Subject: JMR – Cognition & cognitive psychology
BISAC Subject: PSY008000 – PSYCHOLOGY / Cognitive Psychology & Cognition
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011009711