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2022. Cross-currents. International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law 28:2 DOI logo
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2021. A Corpus-Based Exploration of Aboriginal Australian Cultural Conceptualisations in John Bodey’s The Blood Berry Vine. In Cultural Linguistics and World Englishes [Cultural Linguistics, ],  pp. 37 ff. DOI logo

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