Gestural Communication in Nonhuman and Human Primates

Editors
| University of Portsmouth
| European University Viadrina
| University of Manchester
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027222404 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027291868 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Research into gestures represents a multifaceted field comprising a wide range of disciplines and research topics, varying methods and approaches, and even different species such as humans, apes and monkeys. The aim of this volume (originally published as a Special Issue of Gesture 5:1/2 (2005)) is to bring together the research in gestural communication in both nonhuman and human primates and to explore the potential of a comparative approach and its contribution to the question of an evolutionary scenario in which gestures play a significant role. The topics covered include the spontaneous natural gesture use in social groups of apes and monkeys, but also during interactions with humans, gestures of preverbal children and their interaction with language, speech-accompanying gestures in humans as well as the use of sign-language in human and nonhuman great apes. It addresses researchers with a background in Psychology, Primatology, Linguistics, and Anthropology, but it might also function as an introduction and a documentation state of the art for a wider less specialised audience which is fascinated by the role gestures might have played in the evolution of human language.
[Benjamins Current Topics, 10]  2007.  xiv, 284 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction: Gestural communication in nonhuman and human primates
Katja Liebal, Cornelia Müller and Simone Pika
1–4
Articles
The syntactic motor system
Alice C. Roy and Michael A. Arbib
5–32
Gestural communication in nonhuman primates
The gestural communication of apes
Simone Pika, Katja Liebal, Josep Call and Michael Tomasello
35–49
Gestural communication in three species of macaques (Macaca mulatta, M. nemestrina, M. arctoides): Use of signals in relation to dominance and social context
Dario Maestripieri
51–66
Multimodal concomitants of manual gesture by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Influence of food size and distance
David A. Leavens and William D. Hopkins
67–80
Requesting gestures in captive monkeys and apes: Conditioned responses or referential behaviours?
Juan-Carlos Gómez
81–94
Cross-fostered chimpanzees modulate signs of American Sign Language
Valerie J. Chalcraft and R. Allen Gardner
95–117
Gestural communication in human primates
Human twelve-month-olds point cooperatively to share interest with and helpfully provide information for a communicative partner
Ulf Liszkowski
121–138
From action to language through gesture: A longitudinal perspective
Olga Capirci, Annarita Contaldo, Maria Cristina Caselli and Virginia Volterra
139–159
The link and differences between deixis and symbols in children’s early gestural-vocal system
Elena Antinoro Pizzuto and Micaela Capobianco
161–179
A cross-cultural comparison of communicative gestures in human infants during the transition to language
Joanna Blake, Grace Vitale, Patricia Osborne and Esther Olshansky
181–195
How does linguistic framing of events influence co-speech gestures?: Insights from crosslinguistic variations and similarities
Aslı Özyürek, Sotaro Kita, Shanley E.M. Allen, Reyhan Furman and Amanda Brown
197–216
The two faces of gesture: Language and thought
Susan Goldin-Meadow
217–231
Gestures in human and nonhuman primates: Why we need a comparative view
Cornelia Müller
233–256
Book Review
Michael C. Corballis (2002). From hand to mouth. The origins of language
Reviewed by Mary M. Copple
257–275
“The book does not in and off itself support the view that language has its origins in gesture or in the motor system. However, it gives a highly interesting and detailed panorama of current research on communicative gestures and is thus an important contribution to the debate. Additionally, the comparative perspective is interesting in its own right, as is each individual paper. So this is a book well worth reading!”
“What makes this contribution valuable is the multidisciplinary approach with a diverse range of information provided within the same cover. The text is highly readable and most topics are presented in such a way to be easily understood. Even though this book covers a rather specialised topic it is however pertinent to anyone with interest in the origin of human language.”
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Subjects
BIC Subject: JMR – Cognition & cognitive psychology
BISAC Subject: PSY008000 – PSYCHOLOGY / Cognitive Psychology & Cognition
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2007020658