Chapter published in:
L3 Syntactic Transfer: Models, new developments and implications
Edited by Tanja Angelovska and Angela Hahn
[Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5] 2017
► pp. 19
References

References

Alladi, S., Bak, T. H., Duggirala, V., Surampudi, B., Shailaja, M., Shukla, A. K., Chaudhuri, J. R., & Kaul, S.
(2013) Bilingualism delays age at onset of dementia, independent of education and immigration status. Neurology, 81(22) 1938–1944 doi: CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Angelovska, T.
(2017) (When) do L3 English learners transfer from L2 German? Evidence from spoken and written data by L1 Russian speakers. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bardel, C., & Falk, Y.
(2007) The role of the second language in third language acquisition: The case of Germanic syntax. Second Language Research, 23(4), 459–484. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012) Behind the L2 status factor: A neurolinguistic framework for L3 research. In J. Cabrelli Amaro, S. Flynn & J. Rothman (Eds.), Third language acquisition in adulthood (Studies in Bilingualism 46) (pp. 61–78). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bardel, C., & Sánchez, L.
(2017) The L2 status factor hypothesis revisited: The role of metalinguistic knowledge, working memory, attention and noticing in third language learning. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Benati, A., & Schwieter, J.
(2017) Input processing and processing instruction: Pedagogical and cognitive considerations for L3 acquisition. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Benmamoun, E., Montrul, S., & Polinsky, M.
(2013) Defining an “ideal” heritage speaker: Theoretical and methodological challenges. Reply to peer commentaries. Theoretical Linguistics, 39(3–4), 259 – 294. Crossref.Google Scholar
Berkes, É., & Flynn, S.
(2012) Further evidence in support of the cumulative-enhancement model: CP structure development. In J. Cabrelli Amaro, S. Flynn, & J. Rothman (Eds.), Third language acquisition in adulthood (Studies in Bilingualism 46) (pp. 143–164). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cabrelli Amaro, J., & Rothman, J.
(2015) The relationship between L3 transfer and structural similarity across development: Raising across an experiencer in Brazilian Portuguese. In H. Peukert (Ed.), Transfer effects in multilingual language development (Hamburg Studies on Linguistic Diversity 4) (pp. 21–52). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Collins, L., & Muñoz, C.
(2016) The foreign language classroom: Current perspectives and future considerations. The Modern Language Journal, 100(S1), 133–147. Crossref.Google Scholar
de Bot, K., & Jaensch, C.
(2013) What is special about L3 processing? Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 18(2), 130–144. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Falk, Y.
(2017) On pronouns that drop (out of German). In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Falk, Y., & Bardel, C.
(2010) The study of the role of the background languages in third language acquisition. The state of the art. International Review of Applied Linguistics and Language Teaching, 48(2), 185–219. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2011) Object pronouns in German L3 syntax: Evidence for the L2 status factor. Second Language Research, 27(1), 59–82. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Flynn, S., Foley, C., & Vinnitskaya, I.
(2004) The Cumulative-Enhancement Model for language acquisition: Comparing adults’ and children’s patterns of development in first, second and third language acquisition of relative clauses. The International Journal of Multilingualism, 1(1), 3–16. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Flynn, S., & Berkes, É.
(2017) Toward a new understanding of syntactic CLI: Evidence from L2 and L3 acquisition. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Green, D.
(2017) Language control and the acquisition of L3 syntax: the centrality of individual differences. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Ed.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Håkansson, G., Pienemann, M., & Sayehli, S.
(2002) Transfer and typological proximity in the context of second language processing. Second Language Research, 18(3), 250–273. Crossref.Google Scholar
Hermas, A.
(2010) Language acquisition as computational resetting: Verb movement in L3 initial state. International Journal of Multilingualism, 7(4), 343–362. Crossref.Google Scholar
(2014a) Multilingual transfer: L1 morphosyntax in L3 English. International Journal of Language Studies, 8(2), 1–24.Google Scholar
(2014b) Restrictive relatives in L3 English: L1 transfer and ultimate attainment convergence. Australian Journal of Linguistics, 34(3), 361–387. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kaushanskaya, M., & Marian, V.
(2009a) The bilingual advantage in novel word learning. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 16(4), 705–710. Crossref.Google Scholar
(2009b) Bilingualism reduces native-language interference during novel word learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 35(3), 829–835. Crossref.Google Scholar
Kavé, G., Eyal, N., Shorek, A., & Cohen-Mansfield, J.
(2008) Multilingualism and cognitive state in the oldest old. Psychology and Aging, 23(1), 70–78. Crossref.Google Scholar
Lemhöfer, K., Dijkstra, T., & Michel, M. C.
(2004) Three languages, one ECHO: Cognate effects in trilingual word recognition. Language and Cognitive Processes, 19(5), 585–611. Crossref.Google Scholar
Luo, L., Craik, F. I., Moreno, S., & Bialystok, E.
(2013) Bilingualism interacts with domain in a working memory task: Evidence from aging. Psychology and Aging, 28(1), 28–34. Crossref.Google Scholar
Montrul, S., Dias, R., & Santos, H.
(2011) Clitics and object expression in the L3 acquisition of Brazilian Portuguese: Structural similarity matters for transfer. Second Language Research, 27(1), 21–58. Crossref.Google Scholar
Montrul, S., & Ionin, T.
(2012) Dominant language transfer in Spanish heritage speakers and second language learners in the interpretation of definite articles. The Modern Language Journal, 96(1), 70–94. Crossref.Google Scholar
Pienemann, M., Keßler, J.-U., & Lenzing, A.
(2013) Developmentally moderated transfer and the role of the L2 in L3 acquisition. In A. Flyman Attsson & C. Norrby (Eds.), Language acquisition and use in multilingual contexts: Theory and practice (pp. 142–159). Lund: Media-Tryck.Google Scholar
Rothman, J.
(2010) On the typological economy of syntactic transfer: Word order and relative clause high/low attachment preference in L3 Brazilian Portuguese. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Teaching (IRAL), 48(2–3), 245–273. Crossref.Google Scholar
(2011) L3 syntactic transfer selectivity and typological determinacy: The Typological Primacy Model. Second Language Research, 27(1), 107–27. Crossref.Google Scholar
(2013) Cognitive economy, non-redundancy and typological primacy in L3 acquisition: Evidence from initial stages of L3 Romance. In S. Baauw, F. Drijkoningen, & M. Pinto (Eds.), Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 2011 (Romance Languages and Linguistic Theory 5) (pp. 217–47). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2015) Linguistic and cognitive motivations for the Typological Primacy Model (TPM) of third language (L3) transfer: Timing of acquisition and proficiency considered. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 18(2), 179–190. Crossref.Google Scholar
Rothman, J., Cabrelli Amaro, J., & de Bot, K.
(2013) Third Language Acquisition. In J. Herschensohn & M. Young-Scholten (Eds.), Second language acquisition (pp. 372–393). Cambridge: CUP.Google Scholar
Rothman, J., Alemán Bañón, J., & González Alonso, J.
(2015) Neurolinguistic measures of typological effects in multilingual transfer: Introducing an ERP methodology. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1087. Crossref.Google Scholar
Slabakova, R.
(2016) The scalpel model of third language acquisition. International Journal of Bilingualism. Crossref.Google Scholar
Slabakova, R., & García Mayo, M. P.
(2017) Testing the current models of third language acquisition. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Steinlen, A. & Piske, T.
(2016) Minority language students as at-risk learners: Myth or reality? Findings from an early German-English partial immersion program. In C. Ehland, I. Mindt & M. Tönnies (eds), Anglistentag 2015 Paderborn: Proceedings (pp. 9–28). Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.Google Scholar
Steinlen, A. K. & Piske, T.
(2013) Academic achievement of children with and without migration backgrounds in an immersion primary school: A pilot study. ZAA Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik. A Quarterly of Language, Literature and Culture 61 (3), 215–244.Google Scholar
Westergaard, M., Mitrofanova, N., Mykhaylyk, R., & Rodina, Y.
(2016) Crosslinguistic influence in the acquisition of a third language: The Linguistic Proximity Model. International Journal of Bilingualism. Crossref.Google Scholar
Wirbatz, C., & Buttkewitz, P.
(2017) Transfer or no transfer; that is the question: The role of the L1 & L2 in L3 acquisition. In T. Angelovska & A. Hahn (Eds.), L3 syntactic transfer: Models, new developments and implications (Bilingual Processing and Acquisition 5). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 1 other publications

Umejima, Keita, Suzanne Flynn & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai
2021. Enhanced activations in syntax-related regions for multilinguals while acquiring a new language. Scientific Reports 11:1 Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 13 september 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.