Tales and Translation

The Grimm Tales from Pan-Germanic narratives to shared international fairytales

| University of Copenhagen
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027216359 (Eur) | EUR 120.00
ISBN 9781556197895 (USA) | USD 180.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027299758 | EUR 120.00 | USD 180.00
 
Dealing with the most translated work of German literature, the Tales of the brothers Grimm (1812-1815), this book discusses their history, notably in relation to Denmark and subsequently other nations from 1816 to 1986. The Danish intelligentsia responded enthusiastically to the tales and some were immediately translated into Danish by a nobleman and by the foremost Romantic poet. Their renditions remained in print for a century and embued the tales with high prestige. This book discusses translators, approaches, and other parameters such as copyright, and changes in target audiences. The tales’ social acceptability inspired Hans Christian Andersen to write his celebrated fairytales. Combined, the Grimm and Andersen tales came to constitute the ‘international fairytale’.This genre was born in processes of translation and, today, it is rooted more firmly in the world of translation than in national literatures. This book thus addresses issues of interest to literary, cross-cultural studies and translation.
[Benjamins Translation Library, 30]  1999.  xiv, 384 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Introduction
ix–xiv
Germany: telling the tales
1–68
Tracking Danish translations
69–146
Denmark: reception, impact, and sales of the Tales
147–196
Embedding the Tales in Danish
197–252
New tellers of tales: internationalisation
253–286
The end of the tale: summary and conclusion
287–326
Notes
327–344
Works cited
345–351
Appendixes
351–370
Index
371–384
“Dollerup’s study is a fine example of the ways in which book history has given teeth to latterday literary studies.”
“Discussing the imposition of societal norms by the receiving culture in term of 'linguistics/cultural incompatibility' or '-gatekeeping,' Dollerup establishes excellent, nonjudgemental criteria for his evaluation of the 'adequacy' of a translation which avoid such conflicted notions as 'fidelity' to the source text, or censorship operating in the receptor culture.”
“Lóuvrage est donc bien un 'reflet' d'une époque et une illustration de l'importance de la traduction dans d'évolution sociale et même dans d'évolution du statut du traducteur.”
“An exciting book, full of trenchant, innovative analyses and scholarly interactions between a well-known genre, but viewed from a highly informed and insightful rapprochement. brilliant in its attention to thousands and thousands of minute overlapping details, it is salutary reading (and good entertainment) for translation scholars and their advanced students.”
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This list is based on CrossRef data as of 05 september 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

Germanic literature & literary studies

Translation & Interpreting Studies

Translation Studies
BIC Subject: CFP – Translation & interpretation
BISAC Subject: LAN023000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Translating & Interpreting
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  99021420