History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe

Junctures and disjunctures in the 19th and 20th centuries

Volume II

Editors
| Virginia Commonwealth University
| University of Amsterdam
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027234537 | EUR 190.00 | USD 285.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027293404 | EUR 190.00 | USD 285.00
 

Continuing the work undertaken in Vol. 1 of the History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe, Vol. 2 considers various topographic sites—multicultural cities, border areas, cross-cultural corridors, multiethnic regions—that cut across national boundaries, rendering them permeable to the flow of hybrid cultural messages. By focusing on the literary cultures of specific geographical locations, this volume intends to put into practice a new type of comparative study. Traditional comparative literary studies establish transnational comparisons and contrasts, but thereby reconfirm, however inadvertently, the very national borders they play down. This volume inverts the expansive momentum of comparative studies towards ever-broader regional, European, and world literary histories. While the theater of this volume is still the literary culture of East-Central Europe, the contributors focus on pinpointed local traditions and geographic nodal points. Their histories of Riga, Plovdiv, Timişoara or Budapest, of Transylvania or the Danube corridor – to take a few examples – reveal how each of these sites was during the last two-hundred years a home for a variety of foreign or ethnic literary traditions next to the one now dominant within the national borders. By foregrounding such non-national or hybrid traditions, this volume pleads for a diversification and pluralization of local and national histories. A genuine comparatist revival of literary history should involve the recognition that “treading on native grounds” means actually treading on grounds cultivated by diverse people.

Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Editors’ Preface
ix–xi
Acknowledgements
xi
Note on Documentation and Translation
xiii–xiv
Table of contents, Volume I
xv–xviii
In preparation
xix–xxiv
Introduction: Mapping the Literary Interfaces of East-Central Europe
Marcel Cornis-Pope
1–8
CITIES AS SITES OF HYBRID LITERARY IDENTITY AND MULTICULTURAL PRODUCTION
Introduction: Representing East-Central Europe’s Marginocentric Cities
Marcel Cornis-Pope
9–11
Vilnius/Wilno/Vilna: the Myth of Division and the Myth of Connection
Tomas Venclova
11–28
The Tartu/Tallinn Dialectic in Estonian Letters and Culture
Tiina Kirss
28–39
Monuments and the Literary Culture of Riga
Irina Novikova
39–57
Czernowitz/Cernăuti/Chernovtsy/Chernivtsi/Czerniowce: A Testing Ground for Pluralism
Amy Colin
57–77
‘The City that Is No More, the City that Will Stand Forever’: Danzig/Gdańsk as Homeland in the Writings of Günter Grass, Paweł Huelle, and Stefan Chwin
Katarzyna Jerzak
77–92
On the Borders of Mighty Empires: Bucharest, City of Merging Paradigms
Monica Spiridon
93–105
Literary Production in Marginocentric Cultural Node: The Case of Timişoara
Marcel Cornis-Pope, John Neubauer and Nicolae Harsanyi
105–124
Plovdiv: The Text of the City vs. the Texts of Literature
Alexander Kiossev
124–145
The Torn Soul of a City: Trieste as a Center of Polyphonic Culture and Literature
Anna Campanile
145–161
Topographies of Literary Culture in Budapest
John Neubauer and Mihály Szegedy-Maszák
162–175
Prague: Magnetic Fields or the Staging of the Avant-Garde
Veronika Ambros
176–182
Cities in Ashkenaz: Sites of Identity, Cultural Production, Utopic or Dystopic Visions
Seth L. Wolitz, Brian Horowitz and Zilla Jane Goodman
182–212
2. REGIONAL SITES OF CULTURAL HYBRIDIZATION
Introduction: Literature in Multicultural Corridors and Regions
Marcel Cornis-Pope
213–215
The Literary Cultures of the Danubian Corridor
Mapping the Danubian Literary Mosaic
Marcel Cornis-Pope and Nikola Petković
217–224
Upstream and Downstream the Danube
John Neubauer
225–232
The Intercultural Corridor of the ‘Other’ Danube
Roxana M. Verona
232–243
B. Regions as Cultural Interfaces
Transylvania’s Literary Cultures: Rivalry and Interaction
John Neubauer, Marcel Cornis-Pope, Sándor Kibédi-Varga and Nicolae Harsanyi
245–282
The Hybrid Soil of the Balkans: A Topography of Albanian Literature
Robert Elsie
283–301
Up and Down in Croatian Literary Geography: The Case of Krugovaši
Vladimir Biti
301–314
Ashkenaz or the Jewish Cultural Presence in Central and Eastern Europe
Seth L. Wolitz
314–331
Representing Transnational (Real or Imaginary) Regional Spaces
The Return of Pannonia as Imaginary Topos and Space of Homelessness
Guido Snel
333–343
Jan Lam and Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach: Galicia in the Historical Imagination of Nineteenth-Century Writers
Agnieszka Nance
344–356
Macedonia in Bulgarian Literature
Inna Peleva
357–363
Transformations of Imagined Landscapes: Istra and Šavrinija as Intercultural Narratives
Sabina Mihelj
364–373
3. THE LITERARY RECONSTRUCTION OF EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE’S IMAGINED COMMUNITIES: NATIVE TO DIASPORIC
Introduction: Crossing Geographic and Cultural Boundaries, Reinventing Literary Identities
Marcel Cornis-Pope
375–376
Kafka, Švejk, and the Butcher’s Wife, or Postcommunism/ Postcolonialism and Central Europe
Nikola Petković
376–390
Tsarigrad/Istanbul/Constantinople and the Spatial Construction of Bulgarian National Identity in the Nineteenth Century
Boyko Penchev
390–413
Paradoxical Renaissance Abroad: Ukrainian Émigré Literature, 1945–1950
George G. Grabowicz
413–427
Paris as a Constitutive East-Central European Topos: The Case of Polish and Romanian Literature
Monica Spiridon, Agnieszka Gutthy and Katarzyna Jerzak
428–443
A Tragic One-Way Ticket to Universality: Bucharest — Paris — Auschwitz, or the Case of Benjamin Fundoianu
Florin Berindeanu
443–451
Works Cited
453–493
Index of East-Central European Names: Vol. 2
495–510
List of Contributors
511–512
History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe is a significant and monumental venture. [...] These volumes represent a significant and unique addition to the field. Never before have so numerous and so varied essays on the literary cultures of East-Central Europe been available in the English language. [...] History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe is a trendsetter and launches a novel route into the subject, one which scholars will want to follow and explore in the future.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Labov, Jessie
2015. Cold Daysin the cold war on the Hungarian–Serbian border. Studies in Eastern European Cinema 6:2  pp. 139 ff. Crossref logo
Nikiforova, Basia
2012. CENTRAL EUROPE: TERRITORIALITY AND SPIRITUAL IMAGES / VIDURIO EUROPA: TERITORIALUMAS IR DVASINIAI ĮVAIZDŽIAI. CREATIVITY STUDIES 5:2  pp. 103 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: DSB – Literary studies: general
BISAC Subject: LIT000000 – LITERARY CRITICISM / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2004041186