Historical Linguistics 1999

Selected papers from the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Vancouver, 9–13 August 1999

Editor
| University of British Columbia
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027237224 (Eur) | EUR 130.00
ISBN 9781588110640 (USA) | USD 195.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027298317 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
This is a selection of papers from the 14th International Conference on Historical Linguistics held August 9-13, 1999, at the University of British Columbia. From the rich program and the many papers given during this conference, the present twenty-three papers were carefully selected to display the state of current research in the field of historical linguistics.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 215]  2001.  xii, 389 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
xi–xii
How far has far from become grammaticalized?
Minoji Akimoto
1–11
Recent advances in the reconstruction of the Proto-Munda verb
Gregory D.S. Anderson and Norman H. Zide
13–30
Multivariable reanalysis and phonological split
Janice M. Aski
31–47
Are old English conjunct clauses really verb-final?
Kristin Bech
49–62
Alternation according to person in Italo-Romance
Delia Bentley and Thórhallur Eythórsson
63–74
On ablaut and aspect in the history of Aramaic
Vit Bubenik
75–88
Language change and the phonological lexicon of Korean
Young-mee Yu Cho
89–104
Animals and vegetables, Uto-Aztecan noun derivation, semantic classification, and cultural history
Karen Dakin
105–117
Gradience and linguistic change
David Denison
119–144
Distinctive vowel length in Old French: Evidence and Implications
Randall Gess
145–156
Remains of a submerged continent: Preaspiration in the languages of northwest Europe
Gunnar Ólafur Hansson
157–174
Rapid change among expletive polarity items
Jack Hoeksema
175–186
The conversational factor in language change: From prenominal to postnominal demonstratives
Maria M. Manoliu
187–205
On the origin of the Portuguese inflected infinitive: A new perspective on an enduring debate
Ana Maria Martins
207–222
Innovation of the indirect reflexive in Old French
D. Gary Miller
223–239
Lexical forces shaping the evolution of grammar
Marianne Mithun
241–252
Why “me” and “thee”?
Johanna Nichols
253–276
The English s-genitive: Animacy, topicality and possessive relationship in a diachronic perspective
Anette Rosenbach
277–292
Default inheritance hierarchies and the evolution of inflectional classes
Gregory T. Stump
293–307
On the eve of a new paradigm: The current challenges to comparative linguistics in a Kuhnian perspective
Marie-Lucie Tarpent
309–324
Modeling koineization
Donald N. Tuten
325–336
Coreference in the Popolocan languages
Annette Veerman-Leichsenring
337–350
Atlantis Semitica: Structural contact features in Celtic and English
Theo Vennemann
351–369
Index of languages and language families
371–375
Index of names
377–383
Index of subjects
385–389
“[...] their quality makes the reading of these papers a pleasure [...] many of the papers exhibit an integrationist approach, in which evidence from different areas of linguistic analysis is combined where required by the materials and research questions.”
“[...] anyone with any sort of interest in the field of historical linguistics should have no trouble finding something informative, enlightening, and/or thought-provoking to peruse in this excellent volume.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Baerman, Matthew, Dunstan Brown & Greville G. Corbett
2005.  In The Syntax-Morphology Interface, Crossref logo
Brinton, Laurel J. & Elizabeth Closs Traugott
2005.  In Lexicalization and Language Change, Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2001035020 | Marc record