Athabaskan Prosody

Editors
| University of Washington
| University of Toronto
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027247834 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027285294 | EUR 130.00 | USD 195.00
 
This collection of articles on stress and tone in various Athabaskan languages will interest theoretical linguists and historically oriented linguists alike. The volume brings to light new data on the phonetics and/or phonology of prosody (stress, tone, intonation) in various Athabaskan languages, Chiricahua Apache, Dene Soun'liné, Jicarilla Apache, Sekani, Slave, Tahltan, Tanacross, Western Apache, and Witsuwit’en. As well, some contributions describe how prosody is to be reconstructed for Proto-Athabaskan, and how it evolved in some of the daughter languages.
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 269]  2005.  xii, 432 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Contributors
ix
Acknowledgments
xi
Introduction
Keren Rice and Sharon Hargus
1–45
Part I. TONE
The historical development of tone: A pan-Athabaskan perspective on the phonology
47–49
Preface to Michael Krauss’ article
Keren Rice and Sharon Hargus
51–53
Athabaskan Tone (1979)
Michael E. Krauss
55–136
The historical development of tone: A phonetic perspective
The Phonetics of Athabaskan Tonogenesis
John Kingston
137–184
Case Studies
On Tone and Length in Taltan (Northern Athabaskan)
John Alderete
185–207
The Tonology of the Western Apache Noun Stem
Willem J. de Reuse
209–228
Properties of Tone in Dene Soun’liné
Suzanne Gessner
229–247
Pitch, Tone and Intonation in Tanacross
Gary Holton
249–275
Part II. PROMINENCE BEYOND TONE
A pan-Athabaskan perspective on stress
How stress shapes the stem-suffix complex in Athabaskan
Jeff Leer
277–318
Case Studies
Duration, Intonation and Prominence in Apache
Siri G. Tuttle
319–344
Prominence and the verb stem in Slave (Hare)
Keren Rice
345–368
A Corpus-based Approach to Tahltan Stress
John Alderete and Tanya Bob
369–391
Prosody in two Athabaskan languages of northern British Columbia
Sharon Hargus
393–423
Index
425–432
“As is clear from [this volume], Athabaskan presents the most carefully documented and best understood cases of tonogenesis outside of Southeast Asia. This will be a volume that all linguists interested in such phonological issues will want to own.”
“[...] an important contribution to the study of Athabaskan linguistics and, more generally, to research on American Indian languages [...] The diversity of topics explored in the book make it clear that Athabaskan languages provide fertile ground for examining a number of complex prosodic issues.”
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Cited by other publications

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2011.  In The Handbook of Phonological Theory,  pp. 779 ff. Crossref logo
Ball, Jessica & B. May Bernhardt
2008. First Nations English dialects in Canada: Implications for speech‐language pathology. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 22:8  pp. 570 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 26 june 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2005050838