Dictionaries and corpora

Dictionaries and corpora

AHD4 = 2006The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
CELEX2
1996 Ed. by Baayen, R.H., R. Piepenbrock, and L. Gulikers. CD-ROM. Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium.Google Scholar
EPD11 = 1956English Pronouncing Dictionary, 11th ed., ed. by Daniel Jones. London: Dent.Google Scholar
EPD17 = 2006Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary, 17th ed., ed. by Peter Roach, James Hartman, and Jane Setter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Funk=
1893–94A Standard Dictionary of the English Language, 2 vols. ed. by Isaac Kauffman Funk. New York: Funk & Wagnalls.Google Scholar
Levins, Peter
1867 [1570]Manipulus vocabulorum: A Dictionarie of English and Latine Words… ed. by Henry B. Wheatley. New York: Greenwood.Google Scholar
LPD3 = 2008Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, 3rd ed., ed. byJ.C. Wells. Harlow: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
MRC Psycholinguistic Database
= 1988The MRC Psycholinguistic Database: Machine Readable Dictionary, Version 2 ed. byM.D. Wilson. Behavioural Research Methods, Instruments and Computers 20.1, 6–11. (Database available online at http://​www​.psych​.rl​.ac​.uk/ as of 28 December 2013.)Google Scholar
OED1 = 1884–1928/1933The Oxford English Dictionary ed. by James Augustus Henry Murray, Henry Bradley, William Alexander Craigie, and Charles Talbut Onions. Oxford: Clarendon.Google Scholar
OED2 = 1989The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., ed. byJ.A. Simpson and E. Weiner. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
PDAE = 1951A Pronouncing Dictionary of American English ed. by John Samuel Kenyon and Thomas Albert Knott. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam.Google Scholar
Rich = 1836–37A New Dictionary of the English Language, 2 vols. ed. by Charles Richardson. London: W. Pickering.Google Scholar
W3 = 1963Webster’s Third New International Dictionary of the English Language ed. by Philip Babcock Gove. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam. (This is the edition that Sherman consulted. In my own survey I used the CD-ROM version [2000] based on the unabridged edition [1961].)Google Scholar
Web1828 = 1828An American Dictionary of the English Language, 2 vols. ed. by Noah Webster. Now York: S. Converse.Google Scholar
Web1890 = 1890Webster’s International Dictionary of the English Language ed. by Noah Porter. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam.Google Scholar
Web1913 = 1913Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary ed. by Noah Porter. Springfield, Mass.: Merriam. (Available online at http://​machaut​.uchicago​.edu​/websters/ as of 28 December 2013.)Google Scholar
Whit = 1889–91The Century Dictionary, 6 vols. ed. by William Dwight Whitney. New York: The Century Co.Google Scholar
Worc = 1860A Dictionary of the English Language ed. by Joseph E. Worcester. Boston: Hickling, Swan & Brewer.Google Scholar

Secondary sources

Hogg, Richard & C.B. McCully
1987Metrical Phonology: A Coursebook. Cambridge: ­Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hotta, Ryuichi
2012a “Noun-Verb Stress Alternation: An Example of Continuing Lexical Diffusion in Present-Day English”. Journal of the Faculty of Letters: Language, Literature and Culture 110. 36–63.Google Scholar
2012b “Noun-Verb Stress Alternation: Its Nineteenth-Century Development and Its Earlier Historical Backgrounds”. Lexicon 42. 79–94.Google Scholar
2013a “The Diatonic Stress Shift in Modern English”. Studies in Modern English 29. 1–20.Google Scholar
2013b “Frequency and Other Effects on Diatonic Stress Shift”. Journal of the Institute of Cultural Science 75. 121–44.Google Scholar
Katamba, Francis
1989An Introduction to Phonology. New York: Longman.Google Scholar
Kelly, Michael H.
1988 “Rhythmic Alternation”. Cognition 30. 107–137. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Phillips, Betty S.
1984 “Word Frequency and the Actuation of Sound Change”. Language 60. 320–42. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1998 “Word Frequency and Lexical Diffusion in English Stress Shifts”. Germanic Linguistics ed. by Richard Hogg and Linda van Bergen, 223–32. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2006Word Frequency and Lexical Diffusion. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sherman, Donald
1975 “Noun-Verb Stress Alternation: An Example of the Lexical Diffusion of Sound Change in English”. Linguistics 159. 43–71.Google Scholar
Sonderegger, M. & Partha Niyogi
2013 “Variation and Change in English Noun/Verb Pair Stress: Data, Dynamical Systems Models, and Their Interaction”. Origins of Sound Patterns: Approaches to Phonologization ed. by Alan C.L. Yu, 262–84. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Preprint available online at http://​people​.linguistics​.mcgill​.ca​/~morgan/ as of 7 March 2013.) CrossrefGoogle Scholar