Part of
Developments in English Historical Morpho-Syntax
Edited by Claudia Claridge and Birte Bös
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 346] 2019
► pp. 199222
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Cited by

Cited by 3 other publications

Fehringer, Carol
2022. Theget-passive in Tyneside English. English World-Wide. A Journal of Varieties of English 43:3  pp. 330 ff. DOI logo
Kytö, Merja & Erik Smitterberg
2020. Introduction. In Late Modern English [Studies in Language Companion Series, 214],  pp. 2 ff. DOI logo
Schwarz, Sarah
2019. “This Must Be Looked Into”: A Corpus Study of the Prepositional Passive. Journal of English Linguistics 47:3  pp. 249 ff. DOI logo

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