Chapter published in:
English Historical Linguistics: Historical English in contact. Papers from the XXth ICEHL
Edited by Bettelou Los, Chris Cummins, Lisa Gotthard, Alpo Honkapohja and Benjamin Molineaux
[Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 359] 2022
► pp. 7596
References

Sources

DOE = Cameron, Angus, Ashley Crandell Amos & Antoinette DiPaolo Healey
2018Dictionary of Old English: A to I online. Toronto: Dictionary of Old English.Google Scholar
DSL = Dictionary of the Scots Language
combining A dictionary of the Older Scottish tongue and Scottish national dictionary ): http://​www​.dsl​.ac​.uk/
EPNE = Smith, A. H.
1956English place-name elements, 2 volumes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
MED = Kurath, Hans & Sherman M. Kuhn
1952–2001Middle English dictionary. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
OED = Oxford English dictionary
: http://​www​.oed​.com. Where comparison is made between the second edition and the ongoing third edition, these are identified respectively as OED2 and OED3. Otherwise, all references are to the latest revision available in May 2019.
REELS = Recovering the Earliest English Language in Scotland: evidence from place-names
VEPN = Parsons, David N. et al.
1997–The vocabulary of English place-names. 3 volumes so far published. Nottingham: Centre for English Name Studies.Google Scholar
Armstrong, A. M., Allen Mawer, Frank M. Stenton & Bruce Dickins
1950–1952The place-names of Cumberland, 3 volumes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Cavill, Paul
2017A vocabulary of the everyday. In Carole Biggam, Carole Hough & Daria Izdebska (eds.), The daily lives of the Anglo-Saxons, 45–61. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.Google Scholar
2018A new dictionary of English field-names. Nottingham: English Place-Name Society.Google Scholar
Cole, Ann
2013The place-name evidence for a routeway network in early medieval England (BAR British Series 589). Oxford: British Archaeological Reports. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Dodgson, J. McN.
1970–1997The place-names of Cheshire. 5 volumes in 7. Part 5.2 completed and edited by Alexander R. Rumble. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, and Nottingham: English Place-Name Society.Google Scholar
Ekwall, Eilert
1922The place-names of Lancashire. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
1928English river-names. Oxford: Clarendon.Google Scholar
Gelling, Margaret & Ann Cole
2000The landscape of place-names. Stamford: Shaun Tyas.Google Scholar
Gover, John E. B., Allen Mawer & Frank M. Stenton
1931–1932The place-names of Devon, 2 volumes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1938The place-names of Hertfordshire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Grant, Alison
2016Names and lexicography. In Carole Hough with assistance from Daria Izdebska (eds.), The Oxford handbook of names and naming, 572–584. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Healey, Antonette DiPaolo
2016The importance of Old English head . In Wendy Anderson, Ellen Bramwell & Carole Hough (eds.), Mapping English metaphor through time, 165–184. Oxford: Oxford University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Hough, Carole
1996The place-name Cotterstock. English Studies 77(4). 375–378. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2004Chilton and other place-names from Old English cild . Journal of the English Place-Name Society 36. 63–82.Google Scholar
2015Recovering the earliest English language in Scotland: Evidence from place-names. Nomina 38. 101–115.Google Scholar
2016The metaphorical landscape. In Wendy Anderson, Ellen Bramwell & Carole Hough (eds.), Mapping English metaphor through time, 13–31. Oxford: Oxford University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2020aThe etymology of pot ‘deep hole, pit’. Notes & Queries 67(1). 27–31. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
2020bThe migration of Old English to Scotland: Place-name evidence for early Northumbrian settlement in Berwickshire. In Joanna Kopaczyk & Robert McColl Millar (eds.), Language on the move across domains and communities, 231–250. Aberdeen: Forum for Research on the Languages of Scotland and Ulster.Google Scholar
Kitson, Peter
1993Quantifying qualifiers in Anglo-Saxon charter boundaries. Folia Linguistica Historica 14(1–2). 29–82. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Nicolaisen, W. F. H.
2001Scottish place-names (new edn.). Edinburgh: John Donald.Google Scholar
Pons-Sanz, Sara M.
2013The lexical effects of Anglo-Scandinavian linguistic contact on Old English. Turnhout: Brepols. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Rumble, Alexander R.
1988–1989A Bedan gloss on Bedfont, Bedwell, etc. Nomina 12. 123–130.Google Scholar
Sandred, Karl Inge
2001East Anglian place-names: Source of lost dialect. In Jacek Fisiak & Peter Trudgill (eds.), East Anglian English, 39–61. Woodbridge: Brewer.Google Scholar
Scott, Margaret
2003Scottish place-names. In John Corbett, J. Derrick McClure & Jane Stuart-Smith (eds.), The Edinburgh companion to Scots, 17–30. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Smith, A. H.
1937The place-names of the East Riding of Yorkshire and York. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1964–1965The place-names of Gloucestershire, 4 volumes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Smith, Jeremy J.
2009Old English: A linguistic introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Stiles, Patrick V.
1997Old English halh, ‘slightly raised ground isolated by marsh’. In Alexander R. Rumble & A. D. Mills (eds.), An onomastic miscellany in memory of John McNeal Dodgson, 330–344. Stamford: Paul Watkins.Google Scholar
Taylor, Simon
2016Methodologies in place-name research. In Carole Hough with assistance from Daria Izdebska (eds.), The Oxford handbook of names and naming, 69–86. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wright, Joseph
1898–1905The English dialect dictionary, 6 volumes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar