Article published in:
Language Endangerment: Disappearing metaphors and shifting conceptualizations
Edited by Elisabeth Piirainen and Ari Sherris
[Cognitive Linguistic Studies in Cultural Contexts 7] 2015
► pp. 91110
Cited by

Cited by 1 other publications

Sherris, Ari
2020. Safaliba community language awareness: ‘Safale̱ba—a dage̱ya ka o̱ bebee!*’ * ‘Safaliba—it is important for it to exist!’. Language Awareness 29:3-4  pp. 304 ff. Crossref logo

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