Gender, Language and Ideology

A genealogy of Japanese women's language

| Kanto Gakuin University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027206497 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027269294 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
The book examines women’s language as an ideological construct historically created by discourse. The aim is to demonstrate, by delineating a genealogy of Japanese women’s language, that, to deconstruct and denaturalize the relationships between gender and any language, and to account for why and how they are related as they are, we must consider history, discourse and ideology. The book analyzes multiple discourse examples spanning the premodern period of the thirteenth century to the immediate post-WWII years, mostly translated into English for the first time, locating them in political, social and academic developments and describing each historical period in a manner easily accessible for those readers not familiar with Japanese history. This is the first book that describes a comprehensive development of Japanese women’s language and will greatly interest students of Japanese language, gender and language studies, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, and history, as well as women’s studies and sexuality studies.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii–x
List of figures and tables
xi–xii
List of abbreviations in transcriptions
xiii–xiv
Notes on Japanese names, the Romanization of Japanese language and translation 
of Japanese into English
xv–xvi
Introduction
1–36
Part 1. Women’s speech as the object of regulation
Chapter 1. The norms of feminine speech
39–54
Chapter 2. Normalization of court-women’s speech
55–72
Part 2. Gender and national language
Chapter 3. Construction of a national language for men
77–86
Chapter 4. Modernization of the norms of feminine speech
87–102
Chapter 5. Creating indexicality: Schoolgirl speech
103–135
Chapter 6. Masculinizing the national language
137–156
Part 3. Women’s language into national language
157
Chapter 7. Women’s language as imperial tradition: Legitimating colonization
159–169
Chapter 8. Gendering of the national language under national mobilization
171–194
Part 4. Essentializing women’s language
195–197
Chapter 9. Women’s language as reflection of femininity
199–207
Chapter 10. A gendered Japanese national language: Symbol of patriarchy
209–225
Conclusion: Going beyond the gendered linguistic ideologies
227–230
References
231–249
“In this wide-ranging work, Momoko Nakamura develops a challenging, sometimes surprising, but always persuasive critical corrective to deeply entrenched, essentialist conceptions of Japanese women’s language. Her historical discourse approach provides an especially productive vantage point not only on language and gender in Japan but on the formation and transformation of language ideologies everywhere.”
“Through a critical analysis of voluminous historical data on metalinguistic discursive practices, Momoko Nakamura, a preeminent scholar of Japanese language and gender, effectively denaturalizes the orthodox relationship between language and gender and elucidates the process and implications of the ideological construction of “Japanese women’s language.” A stimulating and invaluable addition to the field!”
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2014030879 | Marc record