Part of
Figurative Language – Intersubjectivity and Usage
Edited by Augusto Soares da Silva
[Figurative Thought and Language 11] 2021
► pp. 287306
References
Allan, K.
(2008) Metaphor and metonymy: A diachronic approach. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
(2010) Tracing metonymic polysemy through time: material for object mappings in the OED. In M. Winters, H. Tissari, & K. Allan (Eds.), Historical cognitive linguistics: Syntax and semantics (pp. 163–196). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
(2014) An inquest into metaphor death: Exploring the loss of literal senses of conceptual metaphors. Cognitive Semiotics, 5 (1–2), 291–311.Google Scholar
(2015) Lost in transmission? The sense development of borrowed metaphor. In J. E. Diaz-Vera (Ed.), Metaphor and metonymy across time and cultures (pp. 31–50). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Brugman, C., & Lakoff, G.
(1988) Cognitive topology and lexical networks. In S. Small, G. Cotrell, & M. Tannenhaus (Eds.), Lexical ambiguity resolution: Perspectives from psycholinguistics, neuropsychology and artificial intelligence (pp. 477–508). Palo Alto, CA: Morgan Kaufman. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Collins COBUILD Advanced English Dictionary
Coulson, S.
(2006) Metaphor and conceptual blending. In K. Brown (Ed.), Encyclopedia of language and linguistics, 2nd edn., Vol. 8 (pp. 32–39). Oxford: Elsevier. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Cruse, D. A.
(1986) Lexical semantics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Dale, C.
(2017) The natural world in the Exeter Book riddles. Cambridge: D.S. Brewer.Google Scholar
De Smet, H.
(2010) Grammatical interference: subject marker for and the phrasal verb particles out and forth . In E. C. Traugott, & G. Trousdale (Eds.), Gradience, gradualness and grammaticalization (pp. 75–104). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Dictionary of Old English
Early English Books Online
English Dictionary
Fischer, A.
(2000) Lexical gaps, cognition and linguistic change. In J. Coleman, & C. Kay (Eds.), Lexicology, semantics and lexicology (pp. 1–18). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Geeraerts, D.
(2015) Four guidelines for diachronic metaphor research. In J. E. Diaz-Vera (Ed.), Metaphor and metonymy across time and cultures (pp. 15–27). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Historical Thesaurus of English
. [URL] [Kay, C., Roberts, J., Samuels, M., & Wotherspoon, I. (Eds.) (2009)  The Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press.]
Hough, C.
(2004) New light on the verb understand . In C. Kay, C. Hough, & I. Wotherspoon (Eds.), New perspectives on English historical linguistics: Selected papers from 12 ICEHL, Glasgow, 21–26 August 2002, Volume II: Lexis and transmission (pp. 139–149). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kay, C., & Allan, K.
(2015) English historical semantics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Kroesch, S.
(1926) Analogy as a factor in semantic change. Language 2 (1), 35–45. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, G., Espenson, J., & Schwartz, A.
(1991) Master Metaphor List, 2nd ed. [URL]
Lehrer, A.
(2002) Paradigmatic relations of exclusion and opposition I: Gradable antonymy and complementarity. In D. A. Cruse, F. Hundsnurscher, M. Job, & P. R. Lutzeier (Eds.), Handbook of lexicology (pp. 498–506). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Middle English Dictionary
Murphy, M. L.
(2006) Antonymy and incompatability. In K. Brown (Ed.), Encyclopedia of language and linguistics, 2nd edn., Vol. 1 (314–317). Oxford: Elsevier. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Onysko, A., & Winter-Froemel, E.
(2011) Necessary loans – luxury loans? Exploring the pragmatic dimension of borrowing. Journal of Pragmatics 43 , 1550–1567. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Oxford English Dictionary (OED) Online
(2000–) [URL] OED: Oxford English Dictionary 1884–1928; Supplement and Bibliography 1933 Supplement 1972–1986 2nd edn. 1989 Additions Series 1993–1997 3rd edn. (in progress) OED Online , March 2000–, [URL]
Semino, E.
(2010) Descriptions of pain, metaphor and embodied simulation. Metaphor and Symbol 25 (4), 205–226. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Steen, G., Dorst, A., Herrmann, B., Kaal, A., Krennmayr, T., & Pasma, T.
Traugott, E.
(2012) Linguistic levels: semantics and lexicon. In A. Bergs, & L. Brinton (Eds.), Historical linguistics of English (HSK 34.1) (pp. 164–177). Berlin: De Gruyter.Google Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

[no author supplied]
2022. Future Directions. In Lexical Sociolinguistics,  pp. 181 ff. DOI logo
[no author supplied]
2022. The Sociolinguistics of Polysemy. In Lexical Sociolinguistics,  pp. 47 ff. DOI logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 18 february 2024. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.