Part of
Figurative Thought and Language in Action
Edited by Mario Brdar and Rita Brdar-Szabó
[Figurative Thought and Language 16] 2022
► pp. 5986
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Cited by 3 other publications

Brdar, Mario & Rita Brdar-Szabó
2024. When medical eponyms become false friends, and how to deal with them. English for Specific Purposes 73  pp. 75 ff. DOI logo
Brdar, Mario, Rita Brdar-Szabó & Tanja Gradečak
2022.  Rosie the Riveter of the COVID time. Review of Cognitive Linguistics 20:1  pp. 258 ff. DOI logo
Brdar-Szabó, Rita & Mario Brdar
2022. Metonymy in multimodal discourse, or. In Figurativity and Human Ecology [Figurative Thought and Language, 17],  pp. 209 ff. DOI logo

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