Part of
Figurative Thought and Language in Action
Edited by Mario Brdar and Rita Brdar-Szabó
[Figurative Thought and Language 16] 2022
► pp. 185212
References
Belaj, B., & Tanacković Faletar, G.
(2006) Protučinjenične uvjetne rečenice, mentalni prostori i metonimija u kontekstu teorije konceptualne integracije. Suvremena lingvistika, 32, 151–183.Google Scholar
Bryant, G. A. & Gibbs, R., W.
(2015) Behavioral complexities in ironic humor. In G. Brône, K. Feyaerts & T. Veale (Eds.) Cognitive linguistics and humor research (pp. 147–166). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Burgers, C. van Malken, M., & Schellens, P. J.
(2011) Finding irony: An introduction of the Verbal Irony Procedure (VIP). Metaphor and Symbol, 26, 186–205. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Burgers, C. & Steen, G. J.
(2017) Introducing a three-dimensional model of verbal irony: Irony in language, in thought, and in communication. In A. Athanasiadou & H. Colston (Eds.), Irony in language use and communication (pp. 87–108). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Clark, H. H.
(1996) Using language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Clark, H. H. & Gerig, R. J.
(1984) On the pretense theory of irony. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 113, 121–126. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Colston, H. L.
(1997) Salting a wound or sugaring a pill: The pragmatic functions of ironic criticism. Discourse Processes, 23, 24–53. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2017) Irony performance and perception. What underlies verbal, situational and other ironies? In A. Athanasiadou & H. Colston (Eds.), Irony in language use and communication (pp. 19–41). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2020) Eye-rolling, irony and embodiment. In H. Colston & A. Athanasiadou (Eds.), The diversity of irony (pp. 211–235). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Coulson, S.
(2000) Semantic Leaps: Frame-shifting and Conceptual Blending in Meaning Construction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
(2005) Sarcasm and the space structuring model. In S. Coulson & B. Lewandowska-Tomasczyk (Eds.), The literal and the nonliteral in language and thought (pp. 129–144). Berlin: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Currie, G.
(2006) Why irony is pretense. In S. Nichols (Ed.), The architecture of imagination (pp. 111–133). Oxford: Oxford University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Dews, S. & Winner, E.
(1995) Muting the meaning: A social function of irony. Metaphor and Symbolic Activity, 10, 3–19. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Dews, S., Kaplan, J. & Winner, E.
(1995) Why not say it directly? The social functions of irony. Discourse Processes, 19, 347–367. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Dews, S. & Winner, E.
(1999) Obligatory processing of literal and nonliteral meanings in verbal irony. Journal of Pragmatics, 31, 1579–1599. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Escandell-Vidal, V. & Leonetti, M.
(2020) Grammatical emphasis and irony in Spanish. In H. Colston & A. Athanasiadou (Eds.), The diversity of irony (pp. 183–207). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Fauconnier, G.
(1985) Mental Spaces: Aspects of meaning construction in natural language. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Fauconnier, G., & Turner, M.
(1994) Mental spaces: Aspects of meaning construction in natural language. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(1996) Blending as a central process of grammar. In A. E. Goldberg (Ed.), Conceptual structure, discourse and grammar (pp. 113–130). Stanford: CSLI.Google Scholar
(1998) Conceptual integration networks. Cognitive Science, 22(2), 133–187. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(1999) Metonymy and conceptual integration. In K.-U. Panther, & G. Radden (Eds.), Metonymy in language and thought (pp. 77–91). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2002) The way we think: Conceptual blending and the mind’s hidden complexities. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Fillmore, C. J.
(1971) Verbs of Judging: An Exercise in Semantic Description. In C. J. Fillmore & D. T. Langendoen (Eds.), Studies in linguistic semantics (pp. 272–289). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
(1977) Scenes-and-frames semantics. In A. Zampoli (Ed.), Linguistic Structures processing (pp. 55–81). Amsterdam/New York: North Holland.Google Scholar
(1982) Frame semantics. The Linguistic Society of Korea (Ed.), Linguistics in the morning calm (pp. 111–137). Seoul: Hansin.Google Scholar
(1985) Frames and the Semantics of Understanding. Quaderni di Semantica, 6, 222–253.Google Scholar
Gibbs, R. W.
(1979) Contextual effects in understanding indirect requests. Discourse Processes, 2, 1–10. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(1980) Spilling the beans: On understanding and memory for idioms in conversation. Memory and Cognition, 8, 449–456. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(1983) Do people always process the utterance meanings of indirect requests? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 9, 524–533.Google Scholar
(1984) Literal meaning and psychological theory. Cognitive Science, 8, 275–304. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(1986) On the psycholinguistics of sarcasm. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 115, 3–15. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2012) Are ironic acts deliberate? Journal of Pragmatics, 44, 104–115. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Gibbs, R. W., O’Brien, J. E., & Doolittle, S.
(1995) Inferring meanings that are not intended: Speakers’ intentions and irony comprehension. Discourse Processes, 20, 187–203. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Gibbs, R. W., Bryant, G. A., & Colston, H.
(2014) Where is the humor in verbal irony? Humor – International Journal of Humor Research, 27, 575–595. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Gibbs, R. W. & Samermit, P.
(2017) How does irony arise in experience? In A. Athanasiadou & H. Colston (Eds.), Irony in language use and communication (pp. 43–60). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Glucksberg, S.
(1995) Commentary on nonliteral language: processing and use. Metaphor and Symbolic Activity, 10, 47–57. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Grice, H. P.
(1975) Logic and conversation. In P. Cole & J. L. Morgan (Eds.), Syntax and Semantics: Vol. 3. Speech acts (pp. 41–58). New York: Academic.Google Scholar
(1978) Further notes on logic and conversation. In P. Cole (Ed.), Syntax and Semantics: Vol. 9 Pragmatics (pp. 113–128). New York: Academic.Google Scholar
Haiman, J.
(1998) Talk is cheap. Sarcasm, alienation and the evolution of language. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Jorgensen, J., Miller, G. A. & Sperber, D.
(1984) Test of the mention theory of irony. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 113, 112–120. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kövecses, Z.
(2005) Metaphor in culture: Universality and variation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2006) Language, mind, and culture: A practical introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kreuz, R. J. & Glucksberg, S.
(1989) How to be sarcastic: The echoic reminder theory of verbal irony. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 118, 374–386. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kreuz, R. J. & Roberts, R. M.
(1993) On satire and parody: The importance of being ironic. Metaphor and Symbolic Activity, 8, 97–109. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kreuz, R. J. & Link, K. E.
(2002) Asymmetries in use of verbal irony. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 21, 127–143. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Kumon-Nakamura, S., Glucksberg, S., & Brown, M.
(1995) How about another piece of the pie: The allusional pretense theory of discourse irony. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 124, 3–21. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M.
(1980) Metaphors we live by. Chicago/London: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Lakoff, G., & Kövecses, Z.
(1987) The cognitive model of anger inherent in American English. In D. Holland, & N. Quinn (Eds.), Cultural models in language and thought (pp. 195–221). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Langacker, R. W.
(1987) Foundations of cognitive grammar, Vol. 1. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Littman, D. C. & May, J. L.
(1991) The nature of irony: Toward a computational model of irony. Journal of Pragmatics, 15, 131–151. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Lucariello, J.
(1994) Situational irony. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 113, 112–120.Google Scholar
Muecke, D. C.
(1969) The Compass of Irony. London/New York: Methuen.Google Scholar
Pálinkás, Istvan
(2014) Metaphor, irony and blending. Argumentum, 10, 611–630.Google Scholar
Palmer, G. B.
(1996) Toward a theory of cultural linguistics. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Partington, A.
(2007) Irony and the reversal of evaluation. Journal of Pragmatics, 39, 1547–1569. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Popa-Wyatt, M.
(2014) Pretence and echo: Towards an integrated account of verbal irony. International Review of Pragmatics, 6, 127–168. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Ruiz de Mendoza, F., J. & Lozano-Palacio, I.
(2019) Unraveling Irony: from Linguistics to Literary Criticism and Back. Cognitive Semantics, 5, 147–173. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Schank, R., & Abelson, R.
(1977) Scripts, Plans, Goals and Understanding. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Schwoebel, J., Dews, S., Winner, E., & Srinivas, K.
(2000) Obligatory processing of literal meaning of ironic utterances. Metaphor and Symbol, 15, 47–61. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Shelley, C.
(2001) The bicoherence theory of situational irony. Cognitive Science, 25, 775–818. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Sperber, D.
(1984) Verbal irony: pretense or echoic mention? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 113, 130–136. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Sperber, D, & Wilson, D.
(1981) Irony and the use – mention distinction. In P. Cole (Ed.), Radical pragmatics (pp. 295–318). New York: Academic.Google Scholar
(1986) Relevance: Communication and cognition. Oxford, England: Blackwell: Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Tabacaru, S.
(2020) Faces of sarcasm. Exploring raised eyebrows with sarcasm in French political debates. In A. Athanasiadou & H. Colston (Eds.), The Diversity of Irony (pp. 256–277). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Tobin, V.
(2020) Experimental investigations of irony as a viewpoint phenomenon. In A. Athanasiadou & H. Colston (Eds.), The Diversity of Irony (pp. 236–255). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Tobin, V. & Israel, M.
(2012) Irony as a viewpoint phenomenon. In B. Dancygier & E. Sweetser (Eds.), Viewpoint in Language (pp. 25–46). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Toplak, M., & Katz, A. N.
(2000) On the uses of sarcastic irony. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 1467–1488. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Turner, M.
(1996) Conceptual blending and counterfactual argument in the social and behavioral sciences. In P. Tetlock & A. Belkin (Eds.), Counterfactual Thought Experiments in World Politics (pp. 291–295). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Turner, M., & Fauconnier, G.
(1995) Conceptual integration and formal expression. Metaphor and Symbolic Activity, 10, 183–204. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2000) Metaphor, metonymy, and binding. A. In A. Barcelona (Ed.), Metaphor and metonymy at the crossroads (pp. 133–149). Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Utsumi, A.
(2000) Verbal irony as implicite display of ironic environment: Distinguishing ironic uterrances from nonirony. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 1777–1806. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
Wilson, D., & Sperber, D.
(1992) On verbal irony. Lingua, 87, 53–76. DOI logoGoogle Scholar
(2012) Explaining irony. In D. Wilson & D. Sperber (Eds.), Meaning and relevance (pp. 123–145). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI logoGoogle Scholar