Article published in:
New Approaches to the Study of Later Modern English
[Historiographia Linguistica 33:1/2] 2006
► pp. 139168
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Cited by 1 other publications

Tyrkkö, Jukka
2013. Notes on eighteenth-century dictionary grammars. Transactions of the Philological Society 111:2  pp. 179 ff. Crossref logo

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