Article published in:
Interpreting
Vol. 18:1 (2016) ► pp. 3456
Cited by

Cited by 3 other publications

Abdel Latif, Muhammad M. M.
2020.  In Translator and Interpreter Education Research [New Frontiers in Translation Studies, ],  pp. 111 ff. Crossref logo
Jia, Haibo & Junying Liang
2020. Lexical category bias across interpreting types: Implications for synergy between cognitive constraints and language representations. Lingua 239  pp. 102809 ff. Crossref logo
Pöchhacker, Franz
2018.  In Reception Studies and Audiovisual Translation [Benjamins Translation Library, 141],  pp. 253 ff. Crossref logo

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