Article published in:
ITL - International Journal of Applied Linguistics
Vol. 167:2 (2016) ► pp. 159189
References
Amare, N
(2007) Where is she? Gender occurrences in online grammar guides. Research in the Teaching of English, 42(2), 163–187.Google Scholar
Appleby, R
(2014) Men and masculinities in global English language teaching. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Arries, J.F
(1999) Learning disabilities and foreign languages: A curriculum approach to the design of inclusive courses. Modern Language Journal, 83(1), 98–110. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Atkinson, D
(Ed.) (2011a) Alternative approaches to second language acquisition. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
(2011b) Introduction: Cognitivism and second language acquisition. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), Alternative approaches to second language acquisition (pp. 1–23). London: Routledge. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bartosch, R., & Rohde, A
(Eds.) (2014) Im Dialog der Disziplinen. Englischdidaktik – Förderpädagogik – Inklusion. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.Google Scholar
Baxter, J
(2002) A juggling act. A feminist post-structuralist analysis of girls’ and boys’ talk in the secondary classroom. Gender and Education, 14(1), 5–19. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Berry, R.A. Wiebe
(2006) Inclusion, power, and community: Teachers and students interpret the language of community in an inclusion classroom. American Educational Research Journal, 43(3), 489–529. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bertelsmann-Stiftung
(2014) Inklusionsanteile im Ländervergleich – Schuljahre 2008/09, 2011/12 und 2012/13. Retrieved from https://​www​.bertelsmann​-stiftung​.de​/fileadmin​/files​/Projekte​/27​_In​_Vielfalt​_besser​_lernen​/Inklusionsanteile​_im​_Laendervergleich​_2014​.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2015.Google Scholar
Beukeboom, C.J
(2014) Mechanisms of linguistic bias: How words reflect and maintain stereotypic expectancies. In J.P. Forgas, O. Vincze, & J. László (Eds.), Social cognition and communication (pp. 313–330). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Beukelman, D.R., & Mirenda, P
(2013) Augmentative and alternative communication. Supporting children and adults with complex communication needs (4th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
Block, D
(2007) Second language identities. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Blommaert, J., & Rampton, B
(2011) Language and superdiversity. Diversities, 13(2), 1–21.Google Scholar
Bottema-Beutel, K., & Smith, N
(2013) The interactional construction of identity: An adolescent with autism in interaction with peers. Linguistics and Education, 24(2), 197–214. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Brown, P., & Levinson, S
(1987) Politeness: Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge (BAMF)
Bußmann, H., & Hellinger, M
(2003) Engendering female visibility in German. In M. Hellinger & H. Bußmann (Eds.), Gender across languages. The linguistic representation of women and men (Vol. III1, pp. 141–174). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chlosta, C., Ostermann, T., & Schroeder, C
(2003) Die ‘Durchschnittsschule’ und ihre Sprachen: Ergebnisse des Projekts Sprachenerhebung Essener Grundschulen (SPREEG). Essener Linguistische Skripte, 3(1), 43–139.Google Scholar
Cogo, A., & Dewey, M
(2012) Analysing English as a lingua franca: A corpus-driven investigation. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Corson, D
(2001) Language diversity and education. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Creese, A
(2010) Two-teacher classrooms, personalized learning and the inclusion paradigm in the United Kingdom: What’s in it for learners of EAL? In K. Menken & O. García (Eds.), Negotiating language policies in schools: Educators as policymakers (pp. 32–51). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Cummins, J
(2000) Language, power, and pedagogy: Bilingual children in the crossfire. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dalton-Puffer, C., & Smit, U
(2013) Content and language integrated learning: A research agenda. Language Teaching, 46(4), 545–559. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Decke-Cornill, H
(2007) The issue of gender and interaction in the L2 classroom. In H. Decke-Cornill & L. Volkmann (Eds.), Gender studies and foreign language teaching (pp. 77–90). Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
Decke-Cornill, H., & Volkmann, L
(Eds.) (2007) Gender studies and foreign language teaching. Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
Degen, S
(1999) Integration im Englischunterricht: Chancen gemeinsamen Lernens für Kinder mit und ohne Behinderung. Neuwied: Luchterhand.Google Scholar
de Vincenti, G., Giovanangeli, A., & Ward, R
(2007) The queer stopover: How queer travels in the language classroom. Electronic Journal of Foreign Language Teaching, 41, 58–72.Google Scholar
Doff, S., & Klippel, F
(2007) Mädchen lernen fremde Sprachen – Lehrbücher und Lektüre im 18. und 19. Jahrhundert. In H. Decke-Cornill & L. Volkmann (Eds.), Gender studies and foreign language teaching (pp. 47–61). Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
Eckert, P., & McConnell-Ginet, S
(1992) Think practically and look locally: Language and gender as community-based practice. Annual Review of Anthropology, 211, 461–488. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Eckman, F.R
(2010) Linguistic typology and second language acquisition. In J.J. Song (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of linguistic typology (pp. 618–633). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ellis, S., & McCartney, E
(2011) How to empower teachers working with children with language impairments: Why a ‘just-in-time’ model might work. In S. Ellis & E. McCartney (Eds.), Applied linguistics and primary school teaching: Developing a language curriculum (pp. 252–266). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
European Commission
(2005) Special educational needs in Europe: The teaching and learning of languages. Jyväskylä: UNICOM.Google Scholar
Friend, M., & Bursick, W.D
(2012) Including students with special needs: A practical guide for classroom teachers (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Google Scholar
Gánem-Gutiérrez, G. Adela
(2013) Sociocultural theory and second language development: Theoretical foundations and insights from research. In M. del P. García Mayo, M.J. Gutierrez Mangado, & M.M. Adrián (Eds.), Contemporary approaches to second language acquisition (pp. 129–152). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
García, O., & Menken, K
(2010) Stirring the onion: Educators and the dynamics of language education policies (looking ahead). In K. Menken & O. García (Eds.), Negotiating language policies in schools: Educators as policymakers (pp. 249–261). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Gonzalez, T., Tefera, A., & Artiles, A
(2015) The intersections of language differences and learning disabilities. In M. Bigelow & J. Ennser-Kananen (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of educational linguistics (pp. 145–157). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Haß, F., & Kieweg, W
(2012) I can make it! Englischunterricht für Schülerinnen und Schüler mit Lernschwierigkeiten. Seelze: Kallmeyer.Google Scholar
Hellinger, M
(2001) English - Gender in a global language. In M. Hellinger & H. Bußmann (Eds.), Gender across languages. The linguistic representation of women and men (Vol. I1, pp. 105–113). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hellinger, M., & Bußmann, H
(2001) Gender across languages. The linguistic representation of women and men. In M. Hellinger & H. Bußmann (Eds.), Gender across languages. The linguistic representation of women and men (Vol. I1, pp. 1–25). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hickman, H., & Porfilio, B.J
(Eds.) (2012) The new politics of the textbook: Problematizing the portrayal of marginalized groups in textbooks. Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
Holliday, A
(2008) Standards of English and politics of inclusion. Language Teaching, 41(1), 119–130. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hotonu, A., Aldous, A., Schafer-Dreyer, R., & Beswick, C
(2009) Including children with speech and language delay. London: Featherstone.Google Scholar
Ingram, J., & Elliott, V
(2016) A critical analysis of the role of wait time in classroom interactions and the effects on student and teacher interactional behaviours. Cambridge Journal of Education, 46(1), 37–53. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Jenkins, J
(2007) English as a lingua franca: Attitude and identity. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Jones, J
(2013) Modern foreign languages as an inclusive learning opportunity: Changing policies, practices and identities in the languages classroom. In E. Vilar Beltrán, C. Abbott, & J. Jones (Eds.), Inclusive language education and digital technology (pp. 3–29). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Jones, P.E
(2013) Bernstein’s ‘codes’ and the linguistics of ‘deficit’. Language and Education, 27(2), 161–179. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Julé, A
(2005) A fair share: Gender and linguistic space in a language classroom. Multilingua, 24(1), 25–37. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
King, J.R., & Chetty, R
(2014) Codeswitching: Linguistic and literacy understanding of teaching dilemmas in multilingual classrooms. Linguistics and Education, 25(1), 40–50. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lantolf, J.P
(2011) The sociocultural approach to second language acquisition: Sociocultural theory, second language acquisition, and artificial L2 development. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), Alternative approaches to second language acquisition (pp. 24–47). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
(2012) Sociocultural theory: A dialectical approach to L2 research. In S.M. Gass & A. Mackey (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 57–72). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Lantolf, J.P., & Poehner, M.E
(2008) Introduction. In J.P. Lantolf & M.E. Poehner (Eds.), Sociocultural theory and the teaching of second languages (pp. 1–30). London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Lee, J.F.K
(2014) A hidden curriculum in Japanese EFL textbooks: Gender representation. Linguistics and Education, 27(1), 39–53. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lenzing, A., Plesser, A., Hagenfeld, K., & Pienemann, M
(2013) Transfer at the initial state. Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, 61(3), 265–287. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Letts, C
(2011) Communication impairment in a multilingual context. In S. Ellis & E. McCartney (Eds.), Applied linguistics and primary school teaching: Developing a language curriculum (pp. 267–275). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lewandowski, M
(2014) Gender stereotyping in EFL grammar textbooks. A diachronic approach. Linguistik Online, 681, 83–99.Google Scholar
Liddicoat, A
(2009) Sexual identity as linguistic failure. Trajectories of interaction in the heteronormative language classroom. Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 8(2/3), 191–202. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Linke, G
(2007) Linguistic aspects of gender in the foreign language classroom. In H. Decke-Cornill & L. Volkmann (Eds.), Gender studies and foreign language teaching (pp. 137–159). Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
Machin, D., & Mayr, A
(2012) How to do critical discourse analysis. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Maass, A., Suitner, C., & Merkel, E
(2014) Does political correctness make (social) sense? In J.P. Forgas, O. Vincze & J. László (Eds.), Social cognition and communication (pp. 331–345). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Magos, K., & Politi, F
(2008) The creative second language lesson: The contribution of the role-play technique to the teaching of a second language in immigrant classes. RELC Journal, 39(1), 96–112. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Marshall, J., Stojanovik, V., & Ralph, S
(2002) ‘I never even gave it a second thought’: PGCE students’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with speech and language impairments. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 37(4), 475–489. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Martin, D
(2009) Language disabilities in cultural and linguistic diversity. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Mayer, A., Jaehner, C., & Schick, K
(2014) Wortschatzarbeit im Englischunterricht an der Förderschule Sprache. In R. Bartosch & A. Rohde (Eds.), Im Dialog der Disziplinen. Englischdidaktik – Förderpädagogik – Inklusion (pp. 63–93). Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.Google Scholar
McClure, K.K
(2010) Seeking inclusivity in English language learning web sites. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, 9(4), 265–281. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Meisel, J.M
(2011) First and second language acquisition: Parallels and differences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Michalak, M., & Rybarczyk, R
(Eds.) (2015) Wenn Schüler mit besonderen Bedürfnissen Fremdsprachen lernen. Weinheim: Beltz Juventa.Google Scholar
Modiano, M
(2009) Inclusive/exclusive? English as a lingua franca in the European Union. World Englishes, 28(2), 208–223. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Motschenbacher, H
(2013) New perspectives on English as a European lingua franca. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2015) Some new perspectives on gendered language structures. In M. Hellinger & H. Motschenbacher (Eds.), Gender across languages. The linguistic representation of women and men (Vol. IV1, pp. 27–48). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2016) Gender, inclusion and English language teaching: A linguistic perspective. In D. Elsner & V. Lohe (Eds.), Gender and language learning: Research and practice (pp. 97–112). Tübingen: Narr.Google Scholar
Mußmann, J
(2012) Inklusive Sprachförderung in der Grundschule. München: Ernst Reinhardt.Google Scholar
Nelson, C
(1999) Sexual identities in ESL. Queer theory and classroom inquiry. TESOL Quarterly, 33(3), 371–391. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nelson, C.D
(2006) Queer inquiry in language education. Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 5(1), 1–9. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2007) Queer thinking about language teaching. An overview of published work. In H. Decke-Cornill & L. Volkmann (Eds.), Gender studies and foreign language teaching (pp. 63–76). Tübingen: Gunter Narr.Google Scholar
(2009) Sexual identities in English language education: Classroom conversations. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Norton, B., & McKinney, C
(2011) An identity approach to second language acquisition. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), Alternative approaches to second language acquisition (pp. 73–94). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Norton, B., & Pavlenko, A
(Eds.) (2004) Gender and English language learners. Alexandria, VA: Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages.Google Scholar
Odlin, T
(2003) Cross-linguistic influence. In C.J. Doughty & M.H. Long (Eds.), The handbook of second language acquisition (pp. 436–486). Malden, MA: Blackwell. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ortega, L
(2011) SLA after the social turn: Where cognitivism and its alternatives stand. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), Alternative approaches to second language acquisition (pp. 167–180). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Otheguy, R., García, O., & Reid, W
(2015) Clarifying translanguaging and deconstructing named languages: A perspective from linguistics. Applied Linguistics Review, 6(3), 281–307. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Otlowski, M
(2003) Ethnic diversity and gender bias in EFL textbooks. Asian EFL Journal, 5(2), 1–15.Google Scholar
Otsuji, E., & Pennycook, A
(2011) Social inclusion and metrolingual practices. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 14(4), 413–426. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Paiz, J.M
(2015) Over the monochrome rainbow: Heteronormativity in ESL reading texts and textbooks. Journal of Language and Sexuality, 4(1), 77–101. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pakuła, Ł., Pawelczyk, J., & Sunderland, J
(2015) Gender and sexuality in English language education: Focus on Poland. London: British Council.Google Scholar
Pauwels, A., & Winter, J
(2006) Gender inclusivity or ‘grammar rules ok’? Linguistic prescriptivism vs linguistic discrimination in the classroom. Language and Education, 20(2), 128–140. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Pawelczyk, J., Pakuła, Ł., & Sunderland, J
(2014) Issues of power in relation to gender and sexuality in the EFL classroom – An overview. Journal of Gender and Power, 1(1), 49–66.Google Scholar
Pennycook, A
(2001) Critical applied linguistics: A critical introduction. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Piller, I., & Takahashi, K
(2011) Linguistic diversity and social inclusion. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 14(4), 371–381. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Prengel, A
(2013) Inklusive Bildung in der Primarstufe: Eine wissenschaftliche Expertise des Grundschulverbandes. Frankfurt: Grundschulverband.Google Scholar
Preuss-Lausitz, U
(2013) Inklusionsentwicklung in Deutschland unter Aspekten von Gerechtigkeit, Effektivität und Schulentwicklung. Retrieved from http://​unesco​.de​/fileadmin​/medien​/Dokumente​/Bildung​/Inklusionsentwicklung​_in​_Deutschland​_Preuss​_Lausitz​.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2015.
Sauntson, H
(2012) Approaches to gender and spoken classroom discourse. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2015) Sexualities equality and diversity training in UK schools: An appraisal analysis of teachers’ reflections, attitudes and experiences. In A. Jule (Ed.), Shifting visions: Gender and discourses (pp. 168–190). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.Google Scholar
Sauntson, H., & Simpson, K
(2011) Investigating sexuality discourses in the U.K. secondary English curriculum. Journal of Homosexuality, 58(6/7), 953–973. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Schäfer, U
(2014) Englischunterricht für Schülerinnen und Schüler mit Lernschwierigkeiten. In R. Bartosch & A. Rohde (Eds.), Im Dialog der Disziplinen. Englischdidaktik – Förderpädagogik – Inklusion (pp. 45–62). Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier.Google Scholar
Seidlhofer, B
(2011) Understanding English as a lingua franca. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Shepherd, M.A
(2014) The discursive construction of knowledge and equity in classroom interactions. Linguistics and Education, 28(1), 79–91. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Shohamy, E
(2006) Imagined multilingual schools: How come we don’t deliver? In O. García, T. Skutnabb-Kangas & M.E. Torres-Guzmán (Eds.), Imagining multilingual schools: Languages in education and glocalization (pp. 171–183). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Spolsky, B
(1986) Overcoming language barriers to education in a multilingual world. In B. Spolsky (Ed.), Language and education in multilingual settings (pp. 182–191). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Sunderland, J
(1996) Gender in the ELF classroom. In T. Hedge & N. Whitney (Eds.), Power, pedagogy and practice (pp. 89–100). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
(2000) New understandings of gender and language classroom research. Texts, teacher talk and student talk. Language Teaching Research, 4(2), 149–173. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2010) Theorizing gender perspectives in foreign and second language learning. In R.M. Jiménez Catalán (Ed.), Gender perspectives on vocabulary in foreign and second languages (pp. 1–19). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sunderland, J., & McGlashan, M
(2012) The linguistic, visual and multimodal representation of two-Mum and two-Dad families in children’s picturebooks. Language & Literature, 21(2), 189–210. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Takahashi, K
(2013) Language learning, gender and desire: Japanese women on the move. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Tyler, A
(2010) Usage-based approaches to language and their applications to second language learning. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 301, 270–291. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012) Cognitive linguistics and second language learning: Theoretical basics and experimental evidence. New York, NY: Routledge. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Vance, M
(2011) Supporting children with speech, language and communication needs. In S. Ellis & E. McCartney (Eds.), Applied linguistics and primary school teaching: Developing a language curriculum (pp. 53–63). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Vandrick, S
(2014) The role of social class in English language education. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, 13(2), 85–91. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
van Leeuwen, T
(2008) Discourse and practice: New tools for critical discourse analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Velupillai, V
(2012) An introduction to linguistic typology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Verplaetse, L. Stoops, & Migliacci, N
(Eds.) (2007) Inclusive pedagogy for English language learners: A handbook of research-informed practices. New York, NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Widdowson, H.G
(1994) The ownership of English. TESOL Quarterly, 28(2), 377–389. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Woolley, S.W
(2013) Speech that silences, silences that speak: ‘That’s so gay,’ ‘that’s so ghetto,’ and safe space in High School. Journal of Language and Sexuality, 2(2), 292–319. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cited by

Cited by 10 other publications

Corwin, Lisa A., Amy Prunuske, Shannon B. Seidel & Michèle Shuster
2018. Scientific Presenting: Using Evidence-Based Classroom Practices to Deliver Effective Conference Presentations. CBE—Life Sciences Education 17:1  pp. es1 ff. Crossref logo
Motschenbacher, Heiko
2019. Non‐nativeness as a dimension of inclusion: A multimodal representational analysis of EFL textbooks. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 29:3  pp. 285 ff. Crossref logo
Motschenbacher, Heiko
2021.  In Linguistic Perspectives on Sexuality in Education,  pp. 51 ff. Crossref logo
Motschenbacher, Heiko
2021.  In Research Questions in Language Education and Applied Linguistics [Springer Texts in Education, ],  pp. 711 ff. Crossref logo
Sauntson, Helen
2019. Language, sexuality and inclusive pedagogy. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 29:3  pp. 322 ff. Crossref logo
Sauntson, Helen
2021.  In Linguistic Perspectives on Sexuality in Education,  pp. 315 ff. Crossref logo
Starr, Rebecca Lurie & Mie Hiramoto
2019. Inclusion, exclusion, and racial identity in Singapore's language education system. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 29:3  pp. 341 ff. Crossref logo
Sunderland, Jane
2019. Inclusion and exclusion in foreign language education: A critical overview, with illustrations from studies of a German classroom for young secondary learners and of five Polish textbooks. International Journal of Applied Linguistics 29:3  pp. 308 ff. Crossref logo
Sunderland, Jane
2021.  In Linguistic Perspectives on Sexuality in Education,  pp. 29 ff. Crossref logo
Zhang, Lijuan
2020. The Application of Big Data Technology in the Analysis of Foreign Language Teachers’ Educational Concept and Teaching Ability. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 1648:4  pp. 042042 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 15 april 2022. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.