Article published in:
Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict
Vol. 3:2 (2015) ► pp. 231262
Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Aline, David & Yuri Hosoda
2020. Prefacing opposition: Resources for adumbrating conflict talk in second language peer discussions. International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching 58:2  pp. 161 ff. Crossref logo
Warren, Amber N. & Jessica Nina Lester
2020. How teachers deliberate policy: Taking a stance on third grade reading legislation in online language teacher education. Linguistics and Education 57  pp. 100813 ff. Crossref logo

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