Article published in:
Keeping Ourselves Alive
[Journal of Narrative and Life History 3:2/3] 1993
► pp. 197208
REFERENCES

REFERENCES

Bedford, S.
(1974) Aldous Huxley: A biography. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
Colby, V.
(1970) The singular anomaly: Women novelists of the nineteenth century. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
Craft, C.
(1989) "Kiss me with those red lips": Gender and inversion in Bram Stoker's Dracula. In E. Showalter (Ed.) Speaking of gender (pp. 216–242). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Dellamora, R.
(1990) Masculine desire: The sexual politics of Victorian aestheticism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar
Ellis, H.
(1937) Sexual inversion. In Studies in the psychology of sex (Vol. 1, Pt. 4, pp. 1–384). New York: Random House. (Original work published 1897)Google Scholar
Firchow, P.
(1972) Aldous Huxley: Satirist and novelist. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Gilbert, S. M., & Gubar, S.
(1988) No man's land: The place of the woman writer in the twentieth century: Vol. 1. The war of the words. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
(1989) No man's land: The place of the woman writer in the twentieth century: Vol. 2. Sexchanges. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Grosskurth, P.
(1980) Havelock Ellis. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
Huxley, A.
(1920) The farcical history of Richard Greenow. In Limbo (pp. 1–115). London: Chatto & Windus.Google Scholar
(1929) Fashions in love. In Do what you will (pp. 143–155). New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
(1969) Letters of Aldous Huxley G. Smith Ed.). London: Chatto & Windus.Google Scholar
Robinson, P. A.
(1973) Havelock Ellis and modern sexual theory. Salmagundi, 21, 27–62.Google Scholar
Sutherland, J.
(1990) Mrs. Humphry Ward: Eminent Victorian, preeminent Edwardian. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar