Narrow Syntax and Phonological Form

Scrambling in the Germanic languages

| Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027233738 | EUR 115.00 | USD 173.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027292636 | EUR 115.00 | USD 173.00
 
‘Scrambling’, the kind of word order variation found in West Germanic languages, has been commonly treated as a phenomenon completely unrelated to North Germanic ‘Object Shift’. This book questions this view and defends a unified analysis on the basis of strictly syntactic and phonological evidence. Given that its main conclusions are drawn from German data, it also sheds light on several problematic aspects of the grammar of this language, which have traditionally resisted a principled account. Prominent among these are: the inconsistent behaviour of German coherent infinitives with respect to extraction of their internal arguments; the existence of a less ‘liberal’ type of ‘Scrambling’ within topicalised VPs; the link between reordering possibilities and headfinalness; the asymmetry exhibited by monotransitive and ditransitive structures with respect to the interaction between ‘Scrambling’ and the unmarked word order, and, finally, certain anomalies in the reordering of the lower arguments of ditransitive predicates that assign inherent case.
[Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 109]  2007.  x, 333 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
Ix
Chapter 1: Scrambling: A crosslinguistic perspective
1
1. Scrambling languages
4
2. Types of scrambling
7
3. Scrambling in the Germanic languages
13
Chapter 2: A survey of some basic properties of German
23
1. The structure of the German clause
24
2. Coherent infinitival constructions
32
3. Remnant movement
40
4. The German pronominal system
42
5. Focus scrambling
50
Chapter 3: Scrambling in German
55
1. German scrambling in rough syntax
57
1.1 The iterability of German scrambling
58
1.2 Scrambling within VP
58
1.3 Scrambling within other projections
67
1.4 Some preliminary conclusions about scrambable constituents
69
1.5 The clause-boundedness of scrambling and the syntactic position of scrambled constituents
74
1.6 'Island effects'
79
2. German scrambling at the interfaces
95
2.1 Phonological properties of scrambled elements
95
2.2 Semantic/pragmatic properties of scrambled elements
103
2.3 Tying the phonological and semantic/pragmatic constraints
107
Chapter 4: Previous accounts of German scrambling
121
1. Movement approaches
122
1.1 Scrambling as 'move α' ('government and binding')
124
1.2 Scrambling as 'move' (the 'minimalist program')
152
2. Base-generation approaches
174
2.1 Base-generation, θ-role assignment, and case-checking at PF
175
2.2 Base-generation, θ-role assignment, and case-checking at LF
181
3. Conclusions
186
Chapter 5: The phonological side of reordering processes
191
1. The phonological side of Scandinavian 'object shift'
192
1.1 Scandinavian 'object shift' from a descriptive perspective
193
1.2 Scandinavian 'object shift' in 'stylistic syntax'
200
1.3 Scandinavian 'object shift' in 'narrow syntax'
201
2. The phonological side of German scrambling
211
2.1 Evidence for DISL
212
2.2 Is German scrambling sensitive to 'phonological borders'?
265
Chapter 6: Conclusions, problems, and pending issues
281
Notes
293
References
315
Subject Index
329
“This is a valuable piece of work that can be used as a reference book for an in-depth analysis of German data and theoretical accounts underlying them. The system proposed in this work to account for German scrambling and Object Schift is stimulating and inspiring, and opens up the floor to further discussions of word-order rearrangements in other languages.”
“This is essential reading for anyone interested in ‘Scrambling’ and ‘Object Shift’. Drawing on a wide range of empirical evidence from German, Chocano provides syntactic and phonological evidence for the unification of these linguistic phenomena within a phase-based approach, with important consequences for many languages.”
“Gema Chocano takes of on the daunting task attempting to explain problematic data involving Germanic scrambling such as the Freezing/Anti-freezing Paradox and Coherent Infinitives and through herefforts significantly expands our knowledge of the syntactic and phonological characteristics of this linguistic phenomenon with the aid of current minimalist theory. The arguments put forward in this book are intriguing and thought-provoking. To her credit, Chocano adopts a novel approach to Germanic scrambling and provides her readership with valuable new perspectives.This work will undoubtedly serve as a catalyst for discussion and research into Germanic scrambling and the interaction between the narrowsyntax and PF.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Broekhuis, Hans
2020.  In The Cambridge Handbook of Germanic Linguistics,  pp. 413 ff. Crossref logo
Chocano, Gema
2008. Scrambling and the Survive Principle. By Michael T. Putnam. (Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today, 115.) Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 2007. Pp. ix, 216. Hardcover. €105. doi:10.1017/S1470542708000081. Journal of Germanic Linguistics 20:3  pp. 275 ff. Crossref logo
Karimi, Simin
2008. Scrambling. Language and Linguistics Compass 2:6  pp. 1271 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFK – Grammar, syntax
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2007014515