Article published in:
Metaphor in Specialist Discourse
Edited by J. Berenike Herrmann and Tony Berber Sardinha
[Metaphor in Language, Cognition, and Communication 4] 2015
► pp. 131160
Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Nielsen, Sara, Lucca Julie Nellemann, Lars Bo Larsen & Kashmiri Stec
2020.  In Human-Computer Interaction. Multimodal and Natural Interaction [Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 12182],  pp. 77 ff. Crossref logo
Sheikholeslami, Sara, AJung Moon & Elizabeth A Croft
2017. Cooperative gestures for industry: Exploring the efficacy of robot hand configurations in expression of instructional gestures for human–robot interaction. The International Journal of Robotics Research 36:5-7  pp. 699 ff. Crossref logo

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