Article published in:
Metaphor and the Social World
Vol. 5:1 (2015) ► pp. 124136
Cited by

Cited by other publications

MacArthur, Fiona
2016.  In Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2016 [Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics, ],  pp. 153 ff. Crossref logo
MacArthur, Fiona
2019.  In Metaphor Identification in Multiple Languages [Converging Evidence in Language and Communication Research, 22],  pp. 290 ff. Crossref logo
Semino, Elena
2019.  In Metaphor Identification in Multiple Languages [Converging Evidence in Language and Communication Research, 22],  pp. 314 ff. Crossref logo

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