Pieter Soutman

Life and œuvre

| New York University/Abu Dhabi
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027249647 | EUR 340.00 | USD 510.00
 
While often cited for his relationship to Pieter Paul Rubens’s studio and his work for the courts of Sigismund III of Poland and the Orange court of Frederick Hendrik and Amalia van Solms, Pieter Soutman has never received critical study. Pieter Soutman: Life and œuvre is the first comprehensive consideration of this understudied painter, draftsman, and printmaker. It comprises eight chapters that frame Soutman’s training, his movements through the cities and courts of Antwerp, Warsaw, Haarlem, and The Hague, and his unusual production as a Dutch artist working in a style associated with Flemish art, followed by a fully researched catalogue raisonné of Soutman’s paintings, drawings, and prints. With only six signed paintings known, the catalogue offers an important discussion of the additional 44 pictures associated with Soutman, nine rejected works, and three copies; of the 38 accepted drawings, 42 lost drawings, and 21 rejected works; and concludes with catalogue of Soutman’s 193 prints that includes an inclusive list of states and copies.

Careful research of Soutman’s production additionally sheds new light on artists and patrons associated with his work. Soutman’s connection to Rubens’s workshop and print production results in reattribution of paintings and drawings associated with Rubens and Anthony van Dyck. Recently discovered letters from Soutman to Constantijn Huygens offer a better understanding of Soutman’s work for the Orange court and his potential connection to Rembrandt van Rijn. And by repositioning Soutman within the context of the Haarlem art market and its Catholic collectors, a better understanding of competition, taste, and networks of patronage is gained.
[OCULI: Studies in the Arts of the Low Countries, 12]  2012.  xxii, 383 pp, 182 b/w ills. + 22 full-color ills.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of plates
xiii–xxii
Acknowledgments
ix–xi
Introduction
1–8
Chapter 1. Pieter Soutman and Haarlem
9–23
Chapter 2. Painting the Town Red, Soutman as an Antwerp Painter
24–33
Chapter 3. Effigiavit, Fecit, Invenit, Excudit: Soutman, Rubens, Print Production
34–51
Chapter 4. A Dutchman in Sigismund's Court
52–62
Chapter 5. City, Church, Court: The Return to Haarlem
63–77
Chapter 6. Soutman's Paper Portrait Galleries
78–93
Chapter 7. The Business of Style
94–110
Chapter 8. Commemorating the Past for the Present
111–127
Appendix. Letters to Constantijn Huygens
129–130
Catalogue
131–369
“With her new book on Soutman Kerry Barrett has made a case example of the so long neglected integrated approach of the arts of the Northern and the Southern Netherlands, and as such sheds light on the fascinating process of cultural transmission in Early Modern Europe. Moreover, thanks to its close-reading of life and work, the book brings important new insights in Soutman´s relationship to Rubens and, by extension, in the complicated and hugely relevant matter of Rubens´s studio practice.”
“The main value of Kerry Barrett’s work on Soutman is the complete catalogue of paintings, drawings, and prints, which is entirely convincing in its attributions and will be a standard reference work. Soutman’s engraved oeuvre was previously the best known medium of the artist and now is precisely defined. But the complete catalogue of drawings and paintings is more of a revelation, since works by Soutman have been assigned to Rubens, Van Dyck, Hals and other big names, even when they are quite distinctive of Soutman. This is a very important body of research.”
“As Kerry Barrett states herself, “Pieter Claesz. Soutman’s career as a painter and printmaker largely can be attributed to his unusual status as a Dutch artist who worked in a style deemed Flemish. However, Soutman’s technique, in paint and print, was more flexible than has been suggested and as a result, impossible to categorize in national terms that have roots in the nineteenth-century structure of art history and criticism.” I therefore highly recommend this carefully researched and fully illustrated catalogue raisonné of Pieter Soutman.”
“A monograph on the Dutch artist Pieter Claesz. Soutman (c. 1593/1601-1657) has long been one of the desiderata in the history of seventeenth-century northern art since he combined the art of Holland with that of Rubens and his studio in Antwerp. Kerry Barrett’s catalogue raisonné of Soutman’s life and work admirably accomplishes this task and provides us for the first time with a detailed biography of the artist, often deduced from circumstantial evidence only, and an in-depth analysis of his work.”
“The various chapters of this monograph offer a lively overview of Soutman’s career, based on a critical compilation of the known evidence.However, the great merit of this book lies in the painstakingly edited catalogue raisonné of Soutman’s entire painted, drawn, engraved, and etched oeuvre, which will last as a very useful tool of information for any serious researcher of seventeenth-century Netherlandish art.”
“Barretts studie is een zinvolle bijdrage aan de kunstgeschiedenis. Naast een lang gewenste catalogue raisonné van Soutmans werk is haar werk een zeer relevante casestudie over de artistieke uitwisseling tussen de Noordelijke en Zuidelijke Nederlanden en sluit het aan bij actuele discussies over de rol van grenzen bij artistieke productie in de vroegmoderne periode.”
Subjects
BIC Subject: ACQB – Art & design styles: Baroque
BISAC Subject: ART016000 – ART / Individual Artists / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011039781