Style Shifting in Japanese

Editors
| University of Arizona
| University of Alberta
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027254252 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027289667 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This innovative and interdisciplinary book on style shifting in Japanese brings together a wide range of perspectives and methodologies—including discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, cognitive linguistics, and functional linguistics—to look at a variety of types of style shifting in both spoken and written Japanese discourse. Though diverse in approach, the contributions all reflect the belief that language use is inextricably linked to both context and language structure in mutually constitutive relationships. Topics covered include shifting between "polite" and "plain" styles, the emergence of a "semi-polite" style, speakers' strategic use of gendered styles or regional dialects, shifting between different deictic expressions, and prosodic shifting. This careful and detailed examination advances our understanding of the complex phenomenon of style shifting not only in Japanese, but also more generally, and will be of interest to researchers and students in fields such as linguistics, linguistic anthropology, communication studies, and second language acquisition and teaching.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 180]  2008.  vii, 335 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii–viii
The messy reality of style shifting
Kimberly Jones and Tsuyoshi Ono
1–8
Style shifts in Japanese academic consultations
Haruko Minegishi Cook
9–38
Interpersonal functions of style shift: The use of plain and masu forms in faculty meetings
Naomi Geyer
39–70
Speech style shift as an interactional discourse strategy: The use and non-use of desu/-masu in Japanese conversational interviews
Shoko Ikuta
71–90
Playing with multiple voices: Emotivity and creativity in Japanese style mixture
Senko K. Maynard
91–130
Riyuu ‘Reason’ for nai desu and other semi-polite forms
Mutsuko Endo Hudson
131–160
Masen or nai desu – That is the question: A case study into Japanese conversational discourse
Satoshi Uehara and Etsuko Fukushima
161–184
The power of femininity: Can Japanese gender variation signify contradictory social meanings?
Yuka Matsugu
185–212
Tuning speech style and persona
Yoshiko Matsumoto
213–228
Speech style and the use of regional (Yamaguchi) and Standard Japanese in conversations
Shigeko Okamoto
229–250
“Involved” speech style and deictic management of spatio-temporal and textual reference: A case of ko/so-deictics in Japanese
Kuniyoshi Kataoka
251–284
Variation in prosodic focus of the Japanese negative nai: Issues of language specificity, interactive style, and social situations
Shoji Takano
285–328
Name index
329–331
Subject index
333–335
“The papers in this book address the topic of style shifting in a highly interrelated yet multi-faceted way, giving the reader both depth and breadth of understanding. [...] The research methodologies represented are solid, innovative, and helpful in articulating directions for futurework. There is also broad reference to extant research, which helps to ground the reader theoretically.”
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Matsumoto, Yoshiko
2018. Review of Care communication: Making a home in a Japanese eldercare facility. Contemporary Japan 30:2  pp. 269 ff. Crossref logo
Meacham, Sarah S.
2014. The alternation ofdesu/-masuwith plain form speech and the constitution of social class in Japanese high school English lessons. Pragmatics 24:1  pp. 83 ff. Crossref logo
Mori, Junko, Mutsuko Endo Hudson & Yoshiko Matsumoto
2018.  In Pragmatics of Japanese [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 285],  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Obana, Yasuko
2016. Speech level shifts in Japanese. Pragmatics 26:2  pp. 247 ff. Crossref logo
Sandu, Roxana
2013. Su(m)imasenandgomen nasai. Pragmatics 23:4  pp. 743 ff. Crossref logo
Strycharz-Banaś, Anna
2016. In-group marker going out: Meaning-making in a community of practice. Language in Society 45:5  pp. 665 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 27 september 2019. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2008031616