Women's Epistolary Utterance

A study of the letters of Joan and Maria Thynne, 1575-1611

| University of Sheffield
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027256386 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027271396 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
Located at the intersection of historical pragmatics, letters and manuscript studies, this book offers a multi-dimensional analysis of the letters of Joan and Maria Thynne, 1575-1611. It investigates multiple ways in which socio-culturally and socio-familially contextualized reading of particular collections may increase our understanding of early modern letters as a particular type of handwritten communicative activity. The book also adds to our understanding of these women as individual users of English in their historical moment, especially in terms of literacy and their engagement with cultural scripts. Throughout the book, analysis is based on the manuscript letters themselves and in this way several chapters address the importance of viewing original sources to understand the letters' full pragmatic significance. Within these broader frameworks, individual chapters address the women's use of scribes, prose structure and punctuation, performative speech act verbs, and (im)politeness, sincerity and mock (im)politeness.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 233]  2013.  ix, 266 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix
1. Introduction
1–17
2. The familial backdrop: Short biographies of the Thynne women
19–29
3. ‘Mouths have become hands’: Holograph vs. scribal utterance
31–63
4. Ruling epistolary prose: Punctuation and textual-utterance markers
65–112
5. Everyday magic verbs: Performative utterances
113–153
6. Utterance, power and politeness: The letter exchange between Joan Thynne and Lucy Audley
155–187
7. Sincerity, seriousness and ironic subversions: The attitudes of utterance in the letters of Maria Thynne, c.1601–1610
189–218
8. Conclusions and future directions
219–227
Bibliography
229–238
Appendix

239–261
Index
263–266
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Evans, Mel
2020.  In Royal Voices, Crossref logo
García Prieto, Elisa
2016. ¿Quién escribe las cartas del Rey? Nuevas perspectivas sobre la correspondencia familiar de los Habsburgo. Hispania 76:254  pp. 669 ff. Crossref logo
Lutzky, Ursula
2019. “But it is not prov’d”. Journal of Historical Pragmatics 20:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Marcus, Imogen
2018.  In The Linguistics of Spoken Communication in Early Modern English Writing,  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Marcus, Imogen
2018.  In The Linguistics of Spoken Communication in Early Modern English Writing,  pp. 39 ff. Crossref logo
Marcus, Imogen
2018.  In The Linguistics of Spoken Communication in Early Modern English Writing,  pp. 135 ff. Crossref logo
Taavitsainen, Irma & Andreas H. Jucker
2015. Twenty years of historical pragmatics. Journal of Historical Pragmatics 16:1  pp. 1 ff. Crossref logo
Włodarczyk, Matylda
2017. Auer, Anita, Daniel Schreier and Richard Watts (eds). 2015. Letter Writing and Language Change . Journal of Historical Pragmatics 18:1  pp. 142 ff. Crossref logo
Włodarczyk, Matylda & Irma Taavitsainen
2017. Introduction. Journal of Historical Pragmatics 18:2  pp. 159 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 06 november 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFG – Semantics, Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2013021234 | Marc record