Article published in:
Pragmatic Markers in Irish English
Edited by Carolina P. Amador-Moreno, Kevin McCafferty and Elaine Vaughan
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 258] 2015
► pp. 270291
Cited by

Cited by 9 other publications

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2017.  In Discourse-Pragmatic Variation in Context [Studies in Language Companion Series, 187], Crossref logo
Amador-Moreno, Carolina P.
2016.  In Sociolinguistics in Ireland,  pp. 299 ff. Crossref logo
Amador-Moreno, Carolina P., Karen P. Corrigan, Kevin McCafferty & Emma Moreton
2016.  In Creating and Digitizing Language Corpora,  pp. 25 ff. Crossref logo
Amador-Moreno, Carolina P. & Kevin McCafferty
2015.  In Transatlantic Perspectives on Late Modern English [Advances in Historical Sociolinguistics, 4],  pp. 179 ff. Crossref logo
Avila-Ledesma, Nancy E.
2019. “Believe My Word Dear Father that You Can’t Pick Up Money Here as Quick as the People at Home Thinks It”: Exploring Migration Experiences in Irish Emigrants’ Letters. Corpus Pragmatics 3:2  pp. 101 ff. Crossref logo
Avila-Ledesma, Nancy E. & Carolina P. Amador-Moreno
2016.  In Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2016 [Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics, ],  pp. 85 ff. Crossref logo
McCafferty, Kevin & Carolina P. Amador-Moreno
2019.  In Processes of Change [Studies in Language Variation, 21],  pp. 73 ff. Crossref logo
Ní Mhurchú, Aoife
2018. What’s Left to Say About Irish English Progressives? “I’m Not Going Having Any Conversation with You”. Corpus Pragmatics 2:3  pp. 289 ff. Crossref logo
Rühlemann, Christoph & Brian Clancy
2018.  In Pragmatics and its Interfaces [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 294],  pp. 241 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 04 may 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

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