Involvement and Attitude in Japanese Discourse

Interactive markers

| Australian National University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027256775 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027266071 | EUR 95.00 | USD 143.00
 
This book addresses the long discussed issue of Japanese interactive markers (traditionally called sentence-final particles) in a new light, and provides the comprehensive linguistic documentation of the interactional functions of seven interactive markers: ne, na, yo, sa, wa, zo and ze. By adopting three key notions, ‘involvement’, ‘formality’ and ‘gender’, the study not only reveals the functions and pragmatic effects of each marker, but also sheds light on some fundamental issues of the nature of spoken discourse in general, including how speakers collaborate with each other to create and sustain their conversations and how linguistic functions of verbal forms interface with sociocultural norms. This book will be of interest to students and scholars in a wide range of linguistic fields such as Japanese linguistics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, discourse analysis and applied linguistics and to teachers and learners of Japanese and of a second/foreign language.
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, 272]  2017.  xi, 232 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–x
Abbreviations used in the interlinear gloss
xi–xii
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–22
Chapter 2. Approaches to interactive markers
23–48
Chapter 3. Involvement, formality and gender in language use
49–66
Chapter 4. Involvement and the speaker’s attitudes
67–86
Chapter 5. Incorporate markers ne and na
87–124
Chapter 6. Monopolistic markers yo and sa
125–152
Chapter 7. Monopolistic markers wa, zo and ze
153–196
Chapter 8. Conclusion
197–204
References
205–222
Data sources
223–224
Author index
225–228
Subject index
229–232
“The book provides an invaluable contribution to the study of Japanese grammar and discourse. [...] The book is an important read for both linguists working on Japanese and language learners as it offers thorough and accurate as well as accessible characterizations of the particles.”
References

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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF/2GJ – Linguistics/Japanese
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016043947 | Marc record