Part of
Emotion in Discourse
Edited by J. Lachlan Mackenzie and Laura Alba-Juez
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 302] 2019
► pp. 87112
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Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Jing, Yi
2021. Interpersonal functions of interjections. Functions of Language 28:1  pp. 81 ff. DOI logo
Martínez Caro, Elena
2023. Chapter 13. English oh as a structural and modal marker. In Discourse Phenomena in Typological Perspective [Studies in Language Companion Series, 227],  pp. 369 ff. DOI logo

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