Chapter published in:
Fixed Expressions: Building language structure and social action
Edited by Ritva Laury and Tsuyoshi Ono
[Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 315] 2020
► pp. 133166
References

Data sources

Arkisyn
2018A morphosyntactically coded database of conversational Finnish. Database compiled at the University of Turku, with material from the Conversation Analysis Archive at the University of Helsinki and the Syntax Archives at the University of Turku. Department of Finnish and Finno-Ugric Languages, University of Turku.Google Scholar
LaX
2018Corpus of Finnish dialects. Syntax Archives, Department of Finnish and Finno-Ugric Languages, University of Turku.Google Scholar

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