Article published in:
Emotion, Body and Mind across a Continent: Figurative representations of emotions in Australian Aboriginal languages
Edited by Maïa Ponsonnet, Dorothea Hoffmann and Isabel O'Keeffe
[Pragmatics & Cognition 27:1] 2020
► pp. 2082
References

[ p. 71 ]References

Andersen, Elaine S.
1978Lexical universals of body-parts terminology. In Joseph Harold Greenberg (ed.), Universals of Human Language, 335–368. Standford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Athanasiadou, Angeliki & Elzbieta Tabakowska
1998Speaking of Emotions: Conceptualisation and expression. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Barcelona, Antonio
2000Metaphor and metonymy at the cross-roads: A cognitive perspective. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Blakeman, Bree
2015An ethnography of emotion and morality: Toward a local Indigenous theory of value and social exchange on the Yolŋu Homelands in remote north-east Arnhem Land, Australia. Australian National University.Google Scholar
Brown, Cecil H.
1976General principles of human anatomical partonomy and speculations on the growth of partonomic nomenclature. American Ethnologist 3(3, Folk Biology). 400–424. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Deonna, Julien A., Raffaete Rodogno & Fabrice Teroni
2011In defense of shame: The faces of an emotion. New York: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Dirven, René & Ralf Pörings
2003Metaphor and metonymy in comparison and contrast. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Eather, Bronwyn
2005A first dictionary of Na-Kara. Maningrida: Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation, Maningrida Arts and Culture.Google Scholar
Ekman, Paul
1992An argument for basic emotions. Cognition and Emotion 6(3/4). 169–200. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Enfield, Nick J.
2002Semantic analysis of body parts in emotion terminology: Avoiding the exoticism of “obstinate monosemy” and “online extension.” In Nick J. Enfield & Anna Wierzbicka (eds.), The body in description of emotion, Pragmatics and Cognition, vol. 10(1/2), 1–25. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Enfield, Nick J., Asifa Majid & Miriam Van Staden
2006Cross-linguistic categorisation of the body: Introduction. Parts of the Body: Cross-linguistic Categorisation, Language Sciences 28, 137–147. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Enfield, Nick J. & Anna Wierzbicka
2002The body in description of emotion. Special issue, Pragmatics and Cognition 10. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Evans, Nicholas & David Wilkins
2000In the mind’s ear: The semantic extensions of perception verbs in Australian languages. Language 76(3). 546–592. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2001The complete person: Networking the physical and the social. In Jane Simpson, David Nash, Mary Laughren, Peter Austin & Barry Alpher (eds.), Forty years on: Ken Hale and Australian languages, vol. 512, 493–521. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.Google Scholar
Gaby, Alice R.
2006The Thaayorre “true man”: Lexicon of the human body in an Australian language. In Asifa Majid, Nick J. Enfield & Miriam Van Staden (eds.), Parts of the body: Cross-linguistic categorisation. Language sciences 28. 201–220. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
[ p. 72 ]
2008Guts feelings: Locating emotion, life force and intellect in the Thaayorre body. In Farzad Sharifian, René Dirven, Yu Ning & Susanne Niemeier (eds.), Body, culture and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages, 27–44. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Gaby, Alice R. & John Bradley
2019Wulaya “Head” in Yanyuwa. In Iwona Kraska-Szlenk (ed.), Embodiment in cross-linguistic studies: The “Head”, 263–272. Leiden: Brill. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Geeraerts, Dirk & Caroline Gevaert
2008Hearts and (angry) minds in Old English. In Farzad Sharifian, René Dirven, Ning Yu & Susanne Niemeier (eds.), Culture, body and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages, 319–347. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Gevaert, Caroline
2001Anger in Old and Middle English: A “hot” topic? Belgian Essays in Language and Literature. 89–101.Google Scholar
2005The ANGER IS HEAT question: Detecting cultural influence on the conceptualization of anger through diachronic corpus analysis. In Nicole Delbecque, Johan Van der Auwera & Dirk Geeraerts (eds.), Perspectives on variations: Sociolinguistic, historical, comparative, 195–208. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gippert, Jost, Nikolaus P. Himmelmann & Ulrike Mosel
2006Essentials of language documentation. Berlin: De Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Goddard, Cliff
2004The ethnopragmatics and semantics of active metaphors. Journal of Pragmatics 36(7). 1211–1230. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Gunn, Imogen & Mark Turin
2010Oral literature and language endangerment. Language Documentation and Description 8.Google Scholar
Harkins, Jean
1990Shame and shyness in the Aboriginal classroom: A case for “practical semantics.” Australian Journal of Linguistics 10(2). 293–306. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1996Cultural differences in concepts of shame. In David Parker, Roz Dalziell & Iain Wright (eds.), Shame and the modern self, 84–96. Melbourne: Melbourne Australian Scholarly Publishing.Google Scholar
Hiatt, Less R.
1978Classification of the emotions. In Less R. Hiatt (ed.), Australian Aboriginal Concepts, 182–187. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies.Google Scholar
Izard, Carroll E.
2010More meanings and more questions for the term “emotion.” Emotion Review 2(4). 383–385. Crossref. http://​emr​.sagepub​.com​/cgi​/content​/abstract​/2​/4​/383
Kövecses, Zoltán
1995Anger: Its language, conceptualization and physiology in the light of cross-cultural evidence. In John Taylor & Robert E. McLaury (eds.), Language and the cognitive construal of the world, 181–196. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2002Metaphor: A practical introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
2005Metaphor in culture: Universality and variation. New York: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, George
1987Women, fire, and dangerous things: What categories reveal about the mind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, George & Mark Johnson
1980Metaphors we live by. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
[ p. 73 ]
Lee, Jason & Kasuko Obata
2010Languages of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People – A uniquely Australian heritage. Year Book Australia, vol. 2009–10 Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics.Google Scholar
Lichtenberk, Frantisek
1991Semantic change and heterosemy in grammaticalization. Language 67(3). 35. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Marmion, Doug, Kazuko Obata & Jakelin Troy
2014Community, identity, wellbeing: The report of the Second National Indigenous Languages Survey. Canberra: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.Google Scholar
Myers, Fred R.
1979Emotions and the self: A theory of personhood and political order among Pintupi Aborigines. Ethos 7(4). 343–370. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
1986Pintupi country, Pintupi self: Sentiment, place and politics among Western Desert aborigines. Canberra, Washington: Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies, Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Ogarkova, Anna
2013Folk emotion concepts: Lexicalization of emotional experiences across languages and cultures. In Johnny R. J. Fontaine, Klaus R. Scherer & Cristiana Soriano (eds.), Components of emotional meanings: A sourcebook, 46–62. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ortony, Andrew, Gerald L. Clore & Mark A. Foss
1987The referential structure of the affective lexicon. Cognitive Science 11(3). 341–364. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ponsonnet, Maïa
2009Aspects of the semantics of intellectual subjectivity in Dalabon (south-western Arnhem Land). Australian Aboriginal Studies 2009(1). 16–28.Google Scholar
2010Aspects of the semantics of emotions and feelings in Dalabon (South-Western Arnhem Land, Australia). The Australian Journal of Anthropology 21(3). 367–389. http://​search​.informit​.com​.au​/fullText;res​=APAFT;dn​=201102087. Crossref
2012Body-parts in Barunga Kriol and Dalabon: Matches and mismatches. In Maïa Ponsonnet, Loan Dao & Margit Bowler (eds.), Proceedings of the 42nd Australian Linguistic Society Conference – 2011, 351–387. Canberra: ANU Research Repository.Google Scholar
2014aThe language of emotions: The case of Dalabon (Australia). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
2014bDocumenting the language of emotions in Dalabon (Northern Australia): Caveats, solutions and benefits. In Aicha Belkadi, Kakia Chatsiou & Kirsty Rowan (eds.), Proceedings of Conference on Language Documentation and Linguistic Theory Conference 4, 1–13. London: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.Google Scholar
2014cFigurative and non-figurative use of body-part words in descriptions of emotions in Dalabon. International Journal of Language and Culture 1(1). 98–130. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2014dLes rôles de kangu « ventre » dans les composés émotionnels du dalabon (Australie du Nord): Entre figuratif et littéral. Bulletin de la Société de linguistique de Paris 109(1). 327–373.Google Scholar
2016Emotion nouns in Australian languages. In Peter K. Austin, Harold Koch & Jane H. Simpson (eds.), Language, land and story in Australia, 228–243. London: EL Publishing.Google Scholar
2018aDo linguistic properties influence expressive potential? The case of two Australian diminutives (Gunwinyguan family). Anthropological Linguistics 60(2). 157–190. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
[ p. 74 ]
2018bLexical semantics in language shift: Comparing emotion lexica in Dalabon and Barunga Kriol (northern Australia). Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages 33(1). 226–255. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
2020Difference and repetition in language shift to a creole: The expression of emotions. London: Routledge. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Under review. The affordances of ‘face’ in Dalabon, Gunwinyguan, non-Paman-Nyungan, Australia. In Kelsie Pattillo & Maɫgorzata Waśniewska eds Embodiment in cross-linguistic studies: The ‘face’ Leiden Brill
Ponsonnet, Maïa, James Bednall & Isabel O’Keeffe
2019The respective roles of culture and grammar in shaping emotion metaphors: The case of the Gunwinyguan family (Australian, non-Pama-Nyungan). Nishinomya, Japan: International Cognitive Linguistics Conference 15, Aug 2019.Google Scholar
Radden, Günter
2000How metonymic are metaphors? In Barcelona Antonio (ed.), Metaphor and metonymy at the cross-roads: A cognitive perspective, 93–108. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Radden, Günter & Zoltán Kövecses
1998Metonymy: Developing a cognitive linguistic view. Cognitive Linguistics 23(1). 37–77.Google Scholar
Scherer, Klaus R.
2013Measuring the meaning of emotion words: A domain-specific componential approach. In John R. J. Fontraine, Klaus R. Scherer & Cristina Soriano (eds.), Components of emotional meanings: A sourcebook, 7–30. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Sharifian, Farzad, René Dirven, Ning Yu & Susanne Niemeier
2008Culture and language: Looking for the “mind” inside the body. In Farzad Sharifian, René Dirven, Ning Yu & Susanne Niemeier (eds.), Culture, body and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages, 3–23. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Siahaan, Poppy
2008Did he break your heart or your liver? A contrastive study on metaphorical concepts from the source domain ORGAN in English and in Indonesian. In Farzad Sharifian, René Dirven, Ning Yu & Susanne Niemeier (eds.), Culture, body and language: Conceptualizations of internal body organs across cultures and languages, 45–74. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Truscott, Adriano
2014When is a linguist not a linguist: The multifarious activities and expectations for a linguist in an Australian language centre. Language Documentation and Conservation 8. 384–498.Google Scholar
Turpin, Myfany
2002Body part terms in Kaytetye feeling expressions. In Nick J. Enfield & Anna Wierzbicka (eds.), The body in description of emotion, Pragmatics and Cognition, vol. 10, 271–303. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Verstraete, Jean Christophe & Bruce Rigsby
2015A grammar and lexicon of Yintyingka. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Vittrant, Alice
2013Psycho-collocational expressives in Burmese. In Jeffrey P. Williams (ed.), The aesthetics of grammar: Sound and meaning in the languages of mainland Southeast Asia, 255–279. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Walsh, Michael
2016Ten postulates concerning narrative in Aboriginal Australia. Narrative Enquiry 26(2). 193–216. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wierzbicka, Anna
1999Emotions across languages and cultures: Diversity and universals. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
[ p. 75 ]
2010On emotions and on definitions: A response to Izard. Emotion Review 2(4). 379–380. Crossref. http://​emr​.sagepub​.com​/cgi​/content​/abstract​/2​/4​/379
Wilkins, David
1996Natural tendencies of semantic change and the search for cognates. In Mark Durie & Malcolm Ross (eds.), The comparative method reviewed: Regularity and irregularity in language change, 264–304. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar