References

References

Abdelghany, H.
(2010) Prosodic phrasing and modifier attachment in Standard Arabic sentence processing. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, City University of New York.Google Scholar
Abu-Mansour, M.H.
(2011) The phonology-syntax interface phrasal syncope in Makkan Arabic. In E. Broselow & H. Ouali (Eds.), Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics. Papers from the annual symposia on Arabic Linguistics Volume XXII-XXIII: College Park, Maryland, 2008 and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2009 (pp. 35-56). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref
Ackema, P. & Neeleman, A.
(2003) Context-sensitive spell-out. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory, 21, 681-735. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2012) Agreement weakening at PF: A reply to Benmamoun and Lorimor. Linguistic Inquiry, 43, 75-96. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Adger, D.
(2007) Stress and phasal syntax. Linguistic Analysis, 33, 238-266.Google Scholar
Al-Ali, M.N. & Al-Zoubi, M.Q.
(2009) Different pausing, different meaning: Translating Qur'anic verses containing syntactic ambiguity. Perspectives: Studies in Translatology, 17, 227-241. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Al-Omar, M.
(2013) A comparative study of phonological processes in Syrian and Jordanian Arabic: An Optimality Theoretic approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Essex.Google Scholar
Ali, A.K.
(1996) A prosodic account of syncope and epenthesis in Sudanese Colloquial Arabic. Toronto Working Papers in Linguistics, 15, 1-36.Google Scholar
(2014) Syllabification and phrasing in three dialects of Sudanese Arabic. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto.Google Scholar
Aoun, J.E., Benmamoun, E., & Choueiri, L.
(2010) The syntax of Arabic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Aquil, R.M.
(2006) The segmentation/parsing unit in Cairene Arabic. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Georgetown University.Google Scholar
Beckman, M., Hirschberg, J., & Shattuck-Hufnagel, S.
(2005) The original ToBI system and the evolution of the ToBI framework. In S.-A. Jun (Ed.), Prosodic Typology: The phonology of intonation and phrasing (pp. 9-54). Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Benmamoun, E. & Lorimor, H.
(2006) Featureless expressions: When morphophonological markers are absent. Linguistic Inquiry, 37, 1-23. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Chahal, D.
(2001) Modeling the intonation of Lebanese Arabic using the autosegmental-metrical framework: A comparison with English. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Melbourne.Google Scholar
Cho, Y.-M.Y.
(1990) Syntax and phrasing in Korean. In S. Inkelas & D. Zec (Eds.), The phonology-syntax connection (pp. 47-62). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Chomsky, N.
(2001) On derivation by phase. In M. Kenstowicz (Ed.), Ken Hale: A life in language (pp. 1-52). Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press.Google Scholar
(2005) On phases. Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Chomsky, N. & Halle, M.
(1968) The sound pattern of English. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
Cinque, G.
(1993) A null theory of phrase and compound stress. Linguistic Inquiry, 24, 239-297.Google Scholar
Clements, G.N.
(1978) Tone and syntax in Ewe. In D.J. Napoli (Ed.), Elements of tone, stress and intonation (pp. 21-99). Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
Cooper, W. & Paccia-Cooper, J.
(1980) Syntax and Speech. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cruttenden, A.
(2006) The de-accenting of old information: A cognitive universal. In G. Bernini & M.L. Schwartz (Eds.), Pragmatic organization of discourse in the languages of Europe (pp. 311-355). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Cruz, M.
(2013) Prosodic variation in European Portuguese: Phrasing, intonation and rhythm in central-southern varieties. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Universidade de Lisboa.Google Scholar
D'Imperio, M. & Gili Fivela, B.
(2004) How many levels of phrasing? Evidence from two varieties of Italian. In R. Ogden, J. Local, & R. Temple (Eds.), Phonetic interpretation: papers in laboratory phonology VI (pp. 130-144). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
de Jong, K. & Zawaydeh, B.A.
(1999) Stress, duration, and intonation in Arabic word-level prosody. Journal of Phonetics, 27, 3-22. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2002) Comparing stress, lexical focus and segmental focus: Patterns of variation in Arabic vowel duration. Journal of Phonetics, 30, 53-75. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
El Zarka, D.
(2011) Leading, linking and closing tones and tunes in Egyptian Arabic - what a simple intonation system tells us about the nature of intonation. In E. Broselow & H. Ouali (Eds.), Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics: Papers from the annual symposia on Arabic Linguistics Volume XXII-XXIII: College Park, Maryland, 2008 and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2009 (pp. 57-74). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Crossref
(2013) Pragmatic functions and the biological codes: Evidence from the prosody of sentence topic. In S. Hancil & D. Hirst (Eds.), Prosody and iconicity (pp. 109-126). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Elfner, E.
(2012) Syntax-prosody interactions in Irish. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.Google Scholar
Elordieta, G., Frota, S., Prieto, P., & Vigario, M.
(2003) Effects of constituent weight and syntactic branching on phrasing decisions in Romance. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences , 487-490.
Elordieta, G., Frota, S., & Vigario, M.
(2005) Subjects, objects and intonational phrasing in Spanish and Portuguese. Studia Linguistica, 59, 110-143. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Frota, S.
(2000) Prosody and focus in European Portuguese: Phonological phrasing and intonation. New York: Garland.Google Scholar
Frota, S., D'Imperio, M., Elordieta, G., Prieto, P., & Vigario, M.
(2007) The phonetics and phonology of intonational phrasing in Romance. Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science IV, 282, 131-154.Google Scholar
Frota, S. & Vigario, M.
(2003) The intonation of Standard and Northern European Portuguese. Journal of Portuguese Linguistics, 2, 115-137. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ghini, M.
(1993) Phonological phrase formation in Italian: A new proposal. Toronto Working Papers in Lingusitics, 12, 41-77.Google Scholar
Gorman, K., Howell, J., & Wagner, M.
(2011) Prosodylab-Aligner: A tool for forced alignment of laboratory speech. Journal of the Canadian Acoustical Association, 39, 192-193.Google Scholar
Gussenhoven, C.
(1983) On the grammar and semantics of sentence accents. Dordrecht: Foris.Google Scholar
Hale, K. & Selkirk, E.O.
(1987) Government and tonal phrasing in Papago. Phonology Yearbook, 4, 151-183. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Hellmuth, S.
(2004) Prosodic weight and phonological phrasing in Cairene Arabic. In N. Adams, A. Cooper, F. Perrill, & T. Wier (Eds.), Proceedings of the 40th Meeting of the Chicago Linguistics Society: The Main Session (pp. 97-111). Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society.Google Scholar
(2007) The relationship between prosodic structure and pitch accent distribution: Evidence from Egyptian Arabic. The Linguistic Review, 24, 289-314. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2009) The (absence of) prosodic reflexes of given/new information status in Egyptian Arabic. In J. Owens & A. Elgibali (Eds.), Information Structure in Spoken Arabic (pp. 165-188). Oxford: Routledge.Google Scholar
(2010) Functional complementarity is only skin deep: Evidence from Egyptian Arabic for the autonomy of syntax and phonology in the expression of focus. In N. Erteschik-Shir & L. Rochman (Eds.), The sound patterns of syntax (pp. 247-270). Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2011a) Acoustic cues to focus and givenness in Egyptian Arabic. In B. Heselwood & Z.M. Hassan (Eds.), Instrumental Studies in Arabic Phonetics [CILT319] (pp. 299-324). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2011b) How many levels of phrasing? Empirical questions and typological implications. Proceedings of the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics , 28, 258-266.
(2012) Variable cues to phrasing: finding edges in Egyptian Arabic. In T. Borowsky, S. Kawahara, T. Shinya, & M. Sugahara (Eds.), Prosody matters: Essays in honor of Lisa Selkirk (pp. 237-279). London: Equinox.Google Scholar
(2016) Disjunction at prosodic boundaries. Ms., University of York.Google Scholar
Hoyt, F.
(2014) Prosodic constituency and locality in Levantine Arabic Long-Distance Negative Concord. In R. Khamis-Dakwar & K. Fround (Eds.), Perspectives on Arabic Linguistics (Vol. 26, pp. 47-74). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Inkelas, S. & Zec, D.
(1995) Syntax-phonology interface. In J. Goldsmith (Ed.), The handbook of phonological theory (pp. 535-549). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Ishihara, S.
(2007) Major phrase, focus intonation and multiple spellout. The Linguistic Review, 24, 137-167. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Itô, J. & Mester, R.-A.
(2012) Recursive prosodic phrasing in Japanese. In T. Borowsky, S. Kawahara, T. Shinya, & M. Sugahara (Eds.), Prosody matters: Essays in honor of Elisabeth Selkirk. (pp. 280-303). London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Jelinek, E.
(2002) Agreement, clitics and focus in Egyptian Arabic. In J. Ouhalla & U. Shlonsky (Eds.), Themes in Arabic and Hebrew Syntax (pp. 71-105). Berlin: Springer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Kaisse, E.M.
(1985) Connected speech: The interaction of syntax and phonology. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Kisseberth, C. & Abasheikh, M.I.
(1974) Vowel length in Chi-Mwi:ni - a case study of the role of grammar in phonology. In A. Bruck, A. Fox, & M.W. LaGaly (Eds.), Papers from the 10th Meeting of the Chicago Linguistics Society; Parasession on Natural Phonology (pp. 193-209). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Kratzer, A. & Selkirk, E.O.
(2007) Default phrase stress, prosodic phrasing and the spellout edge: The case of verbs. The Linguistic Review, 24, 93-135. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Ladd, D.R.
(2008) Intonational phonology (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Larson, R.K.
(1988) On the double object construction. Linguistic Inquiry, 335-391.Google Scholar
(1990) Double objects revisited: Reply to Jackendoff. Linguistic Inquiry, 21(4), 589-632.Google Scholar
Lassadi, B.
(2005) The syntax and semantics of optional wh-movement: The case of Egyptian Arabic Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Ottawa.Google Scholar
Morgan, J. & Demuth, K.
(1996) Signal to syntax: Bootstrapping from speech to grammar in early acquisition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
Myrberg, S.
(2013) Sisterhood in prosodic branching. Phonology, 30, 73-124. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Nespor, M. & Vogel, I.
(1986) Prosodic phonology. Dordrecht: Foris.Google Scholar
Pak, M.
(2008) The postsyntactic derivation and its phonological reflexes Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
Pinker, S.
(1984) Language learnability and language development. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
(2009) Language learnability and language development. [With new commentary by the author] (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Post, B.
(2000) Tonal and phrasal structures in French intonation. Doctoral dissertation, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen (LOT series, Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics, 34. Thesus: The Hague).Google Scholar
Prieto, P.
(2005) Syntactic and eurhythmic constraints on phrasing decisions in Catalan. Studia Linguistica, 59, 194-222. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Prince, A. & Smolensky, P.
(2004) Optimality Theory: Constraint Interaction in Generative Grammar. [Revision of Prince & Smolensky (1993).]. Oxford: Blackwell. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Richards, N.
(2010) Uttering trees. Cambridge, MA.: MIT Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Salem, M.
(2003) Bare nominals, focus structure, and reference in Germanic, Romance and Semitic. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University.Google Scholar
Sandalo, F. & Truckenbrodt, H.
(2002) Some notes on phonological phrasing in Brazilian Portuguese. MIT Working Papers in Linguistics, 42, 285-310.Google Scholar
Sawalha, M., Brierley, C., & Atwell, E.
(2012) Prosody prediction for Arabic via the open-source bBoundary-Annotated Qur'an Corpus. Journal of Speech Sciences, 2, 175-191.Google Scholar
Scheer, T.
(2010) A guide to morphosyntax-phonology interface theories: How extra-phonological information is treated in phonology since Trubetzkoy's Grenzsignale. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Selkirk, E.O.
(1981) On prosodic structure and its relation to syntactic structure. In T. Fretheim (Ed.), Nordic Prosody II (pp. 111-140). Trondheim: TAPIR.Google Scholar
(1984) Phonology and syntax: The relation between sound and structure. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
(1986) On derived domains in sentence phonology. Phonology Yearbook, 3, 371-405. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(1996) The prosodic structure of function words. In J. Morgan & K. Demuth (Eds.), Signal to syntax: bootstrapping from speech to grammar in early acquisition (pp. 187-213). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
(2000) The interaction of constraints on prosodic phrasing. In M. Horne (Ed.), Prosody: Theory and experimen. (pp. 231-262). Dordrecht: Kluwer. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2011) The syntax-phonology interface. In J. Goldsmith, J. Riggle, & A. Yu (Eds.), The Handbook of Phonological Theory (2nd ed., pp. 435-484). John Wiley & Sons. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Siemund, R., Heuft, B., Choukri, K., Emam, O., Maragoudakis, E., Tropf, H.. et al.
(2002) OrienTel - Arabic speech resources for the IT market. Proceedings of 'Arabic language resources and evaluation: Status and prospects', a satellite workshop of LREC , 2002., 1-4.
Truckenbrodt, H.
(1995) Phonological phrases: Their relation to syntax, focus and prominence Unpublished doctoral dissertation, MIT.Google Scholar
(1999) On the relation between syntactic phrases and phonological phrases. Linguistic Inquiry, 30, 219-255. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2002) Upstep and embedded register levels. Phonology, 19, 77-120. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2004) Final lowering in non-final position. Journal of Phonetics, 32, 313-348. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
(2007) Upstep on edge tones and on nuclear accents. In T. Riad & C. Gussenhoven (Eds.), Tones and Tunes: Experimental studies in word and sentence prosody. Volume 2: Phonology and Phonetics (pp. 349-386). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Wagner, M.
(2005) Prosody and recursion. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, MIT.Google Scholar
(2010) Prosody and recursion in coordinate structures and beyond. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory, 28, 183-237. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Watson, J.C.E.
(2002) The phonology and morphology of Arabic. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wiltshire, C.
(1998) Extending ALIGN constraints to new domains. Linguistics, 36, 423-467. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Yasin, A.
(2012) Syntax-prosody interface: Evidence from wh-movement in Jordanian Arabic and Egyptian Arabic. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Purdue University.Google Scholar
Yeou, M.
(2004) Effects of focus, position and syllable structure on F0 alignment patterns in Arabic. In B. Bel & I. Marlien (Eds.), Actes des XXVes Journées d'Etude sur la Parole, Arabic Language Processing (pp. 360-374).Google Scholar
Yeou, M., Embarki, M., & Al-Maqtari, S.
(2007) Contrastive focus and F0 patterns in three Arabic dialects. Nouveaux cahiers de linguistique française, 28, 317-326.Google Scholar
Yip, M.
(2002) Tone. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. CrossrefGoogle Scholar
Youssef, I.
(2013) Place assimilation in Arabic: Contrasts, features and constraints. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Tromsø.Google Scholar
Zawaydeh, B. & de Jong, K.
(1999) Stress, phonological focus, quantity and voicing effects on vowel duration in Ammani Arabic. Proceedings of the XIVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences , 1, 451-454.
Zec, D. & Inkelas, S.
(1990) Prosodically constrained syntax. In S. Inkelas & D. Zec (Eds.), The syntax-phonology connection (pp. 365-378). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Zubizaretta, M.L.
(1998) Prosody, focus and word order. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar