Middle and Modern English Corpus Linguistics

A multi-dimensional approach

Editors
| University of Innsbruck
| Kyoto University
| University of Innsbruck
| University of Innsbruck
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027203557 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027274977 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book brings together a variety of approaches to English corpus linguistics and shows how corpus methodologies can contribute to the linking of diachronic and synchronic studies. The articles in this volume investigate historical changes in the English language as well as specific aspects of Middle and Modern English and, moreover, of English dialects. The contributions also discuss the development of English corpus linguistics generally and its potential in the future. Special focus is given to the continuity between Middle and Modern English – much in line with the linking in previous studies of Middle English and Old English under the generic term “medievalism”. This volume highlights the continual development of English from the medieval to modern period.
[Studies in Corpus Linguistics, 50]  2012.  viii, 287 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of abbreviations
vii–viii
Introduction
Manfred Markus, Yoko Iyeiri, Reinhard Heuberger and Emil Chamson
1–10
Corpus linguistics today and tomorrow
Can’t see the wood for the trees?: Corpora and the study of Late Modern English
Joan C. Beal
13–30
Spelling variation in Middle English manuscripts: The case for an integrated corpus approach
Stefan Diemer
31–46
Aspects of language change
The development of compound numerals in English Biblical translations
Isao Hashimoto
49–58
The complements of causative make in Late Middle English
Yoko Iyeiri
59–74
The pragmaticalization and intensification of verily, truly and really: A corpus-based study on the developments of three truth-identifying adverbs
Tine Defour
75–92
Concept-driven semasiology and onomasiology of CLERGY: Focus on the lexicogenesis of pope, bishop and priest
Sylwester Lodej
93–108
ANGER and TĒNE in Middle English
Hans-Jürgen Diller
109–124
Middle and Modern English case studies
The subjunctive vs. modal auxiliaries: Lest-clauses in Late Middle English prose texts
Namiko Kikusawa
127–140
Some notes on the distribution of the quantifier all in Middle English
Tomohiro Yanagi
141–156
Interjections in Middle English: Chaucer’s “Reeve’s Tale” and the Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse
Hans Sauer
157–176
Why and what in Early Modern English drama
Ursula Lutzky
177–190
Colloquialization and not-contraction in nineteenth-century English
Erik Smitterberg
191–206
Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary and thereafter
The complexity and diversity of the words in Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary
Manfred Markus
209–224
Etymology in the English Dialect Dictionary
Emil Chamson
225–240
Towards an understanding of Joseph Wright’s sources: White Kennett’s Parochial Antiquities (1695) and the English Dialect Dictionary
Javier Ruano-García
241–256
The importance of being Janus: Midland speakers and the “North-South Divide”
Clive Upton
257–268
... ging uns der ganze alte Dialektbegriff in eine Illusion auf: The deterritorialization of dialects in the 20th and 21st centuries
Christian Mair
269–284
285–290
Cited by

Cited by other publications

No author info given
2012. PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. English Language and Linguistics 16:3  pp. 551 ff. Crossref logo
GRUND, PETER J. & ERIK SMITTERBERG
2014. Conjuncts in nineteenth-century English: diachronic development and genre diversity. English Language and Linguistics 18:1  pp. 157 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 01 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CFX – Computational linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2011048225