Displaying Recipiency

Reactive tokens in Mandarin task-oriented interaction

| Hunan University
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027201867 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027266576 | EUR 99.00 | USD 149.00
 
This book is intended to address students, researchers and teachers of spoken language. It presents an empirical study of task-oriented language data in which coparticipants display levels of recipiency through reactive tokens. An in-depth investigation of displaying recipiency is of interest primarily to conversation analysts and pragmaticians involved in the research on talk-in-interaction in general and Mandarin Chinese conversations in particular. The communicative aspect makes this book relevant to the areas of language use. While previous research has shown that one single reactive token has different discourse functions in different conversational environments, this study shows that participants’ collaborative orientation to each other’s status of displayed recipiency seems decisive for the selection of reactive tokens, rather than one specific reactive token being employed for specific conversational purposes in varying interactional contexts. This book also contributes to fields in linguistics, pragmatics, and sociology which specialize in the investigation of spontaneous human communication.
[Studies in Chinese Language and Discourse, 6]  2016.  xvii, 198 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
ix–x
Abbreviations
xi–xii
List of tables
xiii–xiv
List of figures
xv–xvi
List of graphics
xvii–xviii
Chapter 1. Introduction
1–6
Chapter 2. Reactive tokens in English and Mandarin conversation
7–30
Chapter 3. Data and approach
31–56
Chapter 4. A sequential analysis of reactive tokens in Mandarin
57–116
Chapter 5. Displaying levels of recipiency through reactive tokens
117–144
Chapter 6. Selection of reactive tokens in information mismatch sequences
145–172
Chapter 7. Conclusion
173–180
References
181–190
Appendix
191–194
List of Names
195–196
List of Subjetcs
197–198
“The contributions of this book are multifaceted. Its theorizations of reactive tokens and recipiency are inspiring to conversation analysts. Its qualitative, context-based approach to reactive tokens provides a necessary complement to the popular quantitative approach. The explorations into the forms and functions of Mandarin reactive tokens and the factors conditioning their use contribute to Chinese conversation studies, and the similarity shown between Mandarin and English reactive tokens is also a contribution to comparative linguistics and intercultural communication studies. The highlight of the recipient’s role in conversation provides a good complement to speaker-oriented conversation analysis studies and provides insights into the interactional nature of human language.”
References

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Cited by

Cited by 2 other publications

Gipper, Sonja
2020. Repeating responses as a conversational affordance for linguistic transmission. Studies in Language 44:2  pp. 281 ff. Crossref logo
Yeh, Meng
2018. Active listenership: Developing beginners’ interactional competence . Chinese as a Second Language Research 7:1  pp. 47 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 22 november 2021. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects & Metadata
BIC Subject: CF/2GDCM – Linguistics/Mandarin
BISAC Subject: LAN009030 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / Pragmatics
ONIX Metadata
ONIX 2.1
ONIX 3.0
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2016025742 | Marc record