Grammar and Inference in Conversation

Identifying clause structure in spoken Javanese

| University of Melbourne
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027226280 | EUR 125.00 | USD 188.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027293909 | EUR 125.00 | USD 188.00
 
This study analyzes how morphosyntactic structures and information flow characteristics are used by interlocutors in producing and understanding clauses in conversational Javanese, focusing on the Cirebon variety of the language. While some clauses display grammatical mechanisms used to code their structure explicitly and redundantly, many other clauses include few if any of these grammatical resources. These extremes mark a cline between the morphosyntactic and paratactic expression of clauses. The situation is thrown into relief by the frequency of unexpressed referents and conversationalists’ heavy reliance on shared experience and cultural knowledge. In all cases, pragmatic inference grounded in the interactional context is essential for establishing not only the discourse functions, but indeed also the very structure of clauses in conversational Javanese. This study contributes to our understanding of transitivity, emergent constituency, prosodic organization and the co-construction of meaning and structure by conversational interlocutors.
[Studies in Discourse and Grammar, 18]  2005.  x, 276 pp.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
vii–ix
1. Introduction
1–13
2. The Morphology of Predicates
15–62
3. The Morphology of Nominal Expressions
63–117
4. Information Flow
119–156
5. Constituents and Constituent Order
157–221
6. Clauses and Interaction
223–245
7. Conclusion
247–254
Notes
255–257
References
259–265
Appendix
267–269
Author index
271–272
Subject index
273–276
“This book is a welcome addition to the few linguistic studies on Javanese that have appeared in English. Ewing's book is more specifically concerned with Cirebon Javanese, and this appears to be the first publications in English on this dialect. The book is well written and easy to read, [...] There are numerous examples of every structure discussed. The book is light on theory and will therefore be accessible to a wide range of linguists.”
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  2005050836 | Marc record