A Reader in the Language of Shakespearean Drama

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In recent years the language of Shakespearean drama has been described in a number of publications intended mainly for the undergraduate student or general reader, but the studies in academic journals to which they refer are not always easily accessible even though they are of great interest to the general reader and essential for the specialist. The purpose of this collection is therefore to bring together some of the most valuable of these studies which, in discussing various aspects of the language of the early 17th century as exemplified in Shakespearean drama, provide the reader with deeper insights into the meaning of Shakespearean text, often by reference to the social, literary and linguistic context of the time.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
ix
Acknowledgements
xi
Introduction
xiii
I. Shakespeare and the English Language
Shakespeare and the English Language
Randolph Quirk
3
Shakespeare and the Tune of the Time
Bridget Cusack
23
Elizabethan Colloquial English in the Falstaff Plays
Vivian Salmon
37
The Social Background of Shakespeare's Malapropisms
Margaret Schlauch
71
Shakespeare's Salutations: A Study in Stylistic Etiquette
Carol Replogle
101
Me, U, and Non-U: Class Connotations of Two Shakespearean Idioms
Peter J. Gillett
117
III. Studies in Vocabulary
(1) Some interpretations
Propertied as All the Tuned Spheres: Aspects of Shakespeare's Language
Robert D. Eagleson
133
The Spoken Language and the Dramatic Text: Some Notes on the Interpretation of Shakespeare's Language
Hilda M. Hulme
145
‘Thou’ and ‘You’ in Shakespeare: A Study in the Second Person Pronoun
Joan Mulholland
153
“You” and “Thou” in Shakespeare's Richard III
Charles Barber
163
An Aspect of Shakespeare's Dynamic Language: A Note on The Interpretation of King Lear III. VII.113: ‘He Childed as I Father'd!’
Kathleen Wales
181
(2) Lexical innovation
Some Functions of Shakespearian Word-Formation
Vivian Salmon
193
Shakespeare' Latinate Neologisms
Bryan A. Garner
207
Latin-Saxon Hybrids in Shakespeare and the Bible
Bryan A. Garner
229
(3) Shakespeare's use of specialised vocabularies
Shakespeare and the ‘Ordinary’ Word
D.S. Bland
237
Thieves' Cant in King Lear
Timothy Musgrove
245
Legal Language in Coriolanus
G. Thomas Tanselle and Florence W. Dunbar
255
IV. Shakespeare and Elizabethan Grammar
(1) Studies in syntax
Sentence Structures in Colloquial Shakespearian English
Vivian Salmon
265
Pronominal Case in Shakespearean Imperatives
Celia Millward
301
The Perfect Auxiliaries in the Language of Shakespeare
Piotr Kakietek
309
May and Might in Shakespeare's English
Piotr Kakietek
319
Notes on the Use of the Ingressive Auxiliaries in the Works of William Shakespeare
Y.M. Biese
329
Multiple Negation in Shakespeare
Rajendra Singh
339
(2) Studies in inflection
Shakespeare's Use of eth and es Endings of Verbs in the First Folio
Estelle W. Taylor
349
Shakespeare's Use of s Endings of the Verbs to do and to have in the First Folio
Estelle W. Taylor
371
V. Studies in Rhetoric and Metre
Shakespeare's Use of Rhetoric
Brian Vickers
391
Hendiadys and Hamlet
George T. Wright
407
The Iambic Pentameter Revisited
Clayton Koelb
433
VI. Punctuation
Shakespearian Punctuation - A new beginning
D.F. McKenzie
445
Repunctuation as Interpretation in Editions of Shakespeare
Michael J. Warren
455
VII. The Linguistic Context of Shakespearean Drama
Shakespeare's view of Language: An Historical Perspective
Margreta de Grazia
473
The Poor Cat's Adage and other Shakespearean Proverbs in Elizabethan Grammar-School Education
Martin Orkin
489
Language in Love's Labour's Lost
William Matthews
499
Index
511
Subjects

Literature & Literary Studies

English literature & literary studies
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  86030991
Cited by

Cited by other publications

Blake, N. F.
2007.  In A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture,  pp. 71 ff. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470998731.ch6
Crystal, David
2013. Early Interest in Shakespearean: Original Pronunciation. Language & History 56:1  pp. 5 ff. https://doi.org/10.1179/1759753613Z.00000000013
Linn, Andrew R & William Poole
2013. GUEST EDITORIAL: Vivian Salmon (1921–2010). Language & History 56:1  pp. 1 ff. https://doi.org/10.1179/1759753613Z.00000000018
van Gelderen, Elly
2014.  In A History of the English Language, https://doi.org/10.1075/z.183

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