Theory Groups and the Study of Language in North America

A social history

| El Instituto Obregón, San Francisco
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027245564 (Eur) | EUR 150.00
ISBN 9781556193644 (USA) | USD 225.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027284969 | EUR 150.00 | USD 225.00
 
Based on extensive archival research, interviews, and participant observation over the course of two decades, Theory Groups in the Study of Language in North America provides a detailed social history of traditions and “revolutionary” challenges to traditions within North American linguistics, especially within 20th-century anthropological linguistics. After showing substantial differences between Bloomfield's and neo-Bloomfieldian theorizing, Murray shows that early transformational-generative work on syntax grew out of neo-Bloomfieldian structuralism, and was promoted by neo-Bloomfieldian gatekeepers, in particular longtime Language editor Bernard Bloch. The central case studies of the book contrast the (increasingly) “revolutionary rhetoric” of transformational-generative grammarians with rhetorics of continuity emitted by two linguistic anthropology groupings that began simultaneously with TGG in the late-1950s, the ethnography of communication and ethnoscience.

The history of linguistics in North America provides a continuum from isolated scholars to successful groups dominating entire disciplines. Although focused on groupings — both “invisible colleges” and readily visible institutions — Murray discusses those writing about language in society who were not participants in “theory groups” or “schools” both before and after the three central case studies. He provides a theory of social bases for claiming to be making “scientific revolution” in contrast to building on sound “traditions”, and suggests non-cognitive reasons for success in the often rhetorically violent contention of perspectives about language in North America during the last century and a half.

The book includes appendices explaining the methodology used, an extensive bibliography, and an index.

Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of Tables
xiii
List of Figures
xv
Introduction
xvii
1. Theory groups in science
1
2. Early work on American languages
27
3. Franz Boas and the Institutionalization of Academic Anthropology
47
4. Boas's students
67
5. Edward Sapir
77
6. Was Bloomfield a Bloomfieldian
113
7. Neo-Bloomfieldians
137
8. Structuralist Diversification during the 1950s
185
9. Transformational-Generative Grammar before the1964-66 Revelations
225
10. Language contact and early sociolinguistics
249
11. The Ethnography of Speaking
289
12. Related perspectives
341
13. Ethnosciene
391
14. The sociology of language
419
15. Permanent Chomskian civil war in linguistics
431
16. The third generation of University of California sociolinguists
447
17. The turn away from linguistic interest in contemporary American anthropology
473
18. Conclusions
479
An Appendix on Methods
491
Bibliography
503
Index of Names
577
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Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  93034835