The Explanation of Linguistic Causes

Az-Zağğāğī's Theory of Grammar

Introduction, translation, commentary

| University of Nijmegen
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027245625 (Eur) | EUR 120.00
ISBN 9781556196119 (USA) | USD 180.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027276384 | EUR 120.00 | USD 180.00
 
The ultimate aim of every linguistic tradition is to go beyond the purely descriptive level and seek an explanation for linguistic phenomena. Traditions differ, however, with regard to the class of linguistic phenomena they wish to explain and the framework in which they define their explanation. In this volume the English translation is presented of the treatise on linguistic explanation by the 10th-century Arab grammarian az-Zağğāğī, one of the most original thinkers of the Arabic tradition. He worked in a period in which the influence of Greek logic and philosophy made itself felt in almost all Arabo-Islamic disciplines. Some of the problems he deals with are familiar to modern linguists (e.g., morphological segmentation, categorization of parts of speech), others are comprehensible only within the frame of reference of Arabic linguistics (e.g., the declension of the verb). An extensive commentary on the text analyzes the problems discussed, both within the Arabic tradition and from the point of view of modern linguistics. Apart from the index of names and terms, there is an index of subjects which enables the general reader to consult text and comments on specific key notions.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
Preface
xi
Introduction: Az-Zaǧǧāǧī and his book on the explanation of linguistic causes
1
Notes
10
The Book of Explanation of Linguistic Causes
13
Introduction
15
Notes
20
I. The parts of speech
22
Notes
27
II. The disagreement of the grammarians about the definitions of noun, verb and particle
43
Notes
45
III. The knowledge of the definitions of noun, verb and particle
49
Notes
56
IV. The theories about the verb and the infinitive: which one of them is derived from the other?
72
Notes
81
V. The theory of linguistic causes
87
Notes
90
VI. The theory about declension and speech: which one of them is prior to the other?
95
Notes
98
VII. The theory about the declension: why was it introduced into speech?
101
Notes
104
VIII. The theory about the declension: is it a vowel or a consonant?
109
Notes
113
IX. The theory about the declension: why does it occur at the end of the word, rather than at the beginning or in the middle?
118
Notes
120
X. The theory about [the problem] which of these three parts — the noun, the verb and the particle: is entitled to declension?
121
Notes
126
XI. The theory about the noun, the verb and the particle: which one of them comes first in rank and hierarchy?
135
Notes
137
XII. The theory concerning the verbs: which one of them is prior to the others?
139
Notes
140
XIII. The present verb and its real nature
142
Notes
144
XIV. What is the reason for calling grammar naḥw?
147
Notes
149
XV. The difference between ‘grammar’, ‘lexicography’, ‘declension’ and ‘glosses’
152
Notes
154
XVI. The theory about the lexical meaning of the [words] ‘nominative’, ‘accusative’ and ‘genitive’
157
Notes
159
XVII. The use of learning grammar
164
Notes
166
XVIII. The reason for the introduction of nunation into speech, and its different aspects
168
Notes
171
XIX. The reason for the heaviness of the verb and the lightness of the noun
177
Notes
179
XX. The reason why nouns cannot have a jussive
182
Notes
187
XXI. The reason why verbs cannot have a genitive
190
Notes
205
XXII. The theory about the dual and the plural
216
Notes
224
XXIII. The theory about the ‘alif, the y and the w in the dual and the plural: are they the declension or the consonants of the declension?
231
Notes
235
Selected problems
240
Notes
247
List of references
A) Primary sources
258
B) Secondary sources
268
Abbreviations
280
Index of names
283
Index of subjects
289
Index of terms
301
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Chatti, Saloua
2014. Syncategorematain Arabic Logic, al-Fārābī and Avicenna. History and Philosophy of Logic 35:2  pp. 167 ff. Crossref logo
Michael G. Carter
2013. “Blessed are the cheese makers”: Reflections on the Transmission of Knowledge in Islam. Journal of the American Oriental Society 133:4  pp. 597 ff. Crossref logo
Schöck, Cornelia
2008.  In The Unity of Science in the Arabic Tradition,  pp. 329 ff. Crossref logo

This list is based on CrossRef data as of 02 may 2020. Please note that it may not be complete. Sources presented here have been supplied by the respective publishers. Any errors therein should be reported to them.

Subjects
BIC Subject: CF – Linguistics
BISAC Subject: LAN009000 – LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / Linguistics / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  95013720