The Noblest Animate Motion

Speech, physiology and medicine in pre-Cartesian linguistic thought

| Solidarity Foundation, New York
HardboundAvailable
ISBN 9789027245717 (Eur) | EUR 192.00
ISBN 9781556196201 (USA) | USD 288.00
 
e-Book
ISBN 9789027275806 | EUR 192.00 | USD 288.00
 
The body of theory on speech production and speech disorder developed prior to Descartes has been so neglected by historians that its very existence is practically unknown today. Yet it provides a framework for understanding the speech process which is not only comprehensive and coherent, but of great relevance to current debates on issues of language performance and applied linguistics. Current theoretical difficulties stem largely from initial errors of Descartes; whereas earlier theoretical formulations, while outlining a bio-mechanics of speech, retain the central role of the human agent.
The discussions explicated in this book come mainly from the natural-philosophic and medical literature of Greco-Roman Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance and early 17th century. This uncharted territory is mapped by tracing its textual history and diffusion as well as explaining the theory on its own terms but in clear and comprehensible language. Interdisciplinary in perspective, the book encompasses topics of interest not only to the language sciences, but also to the biosciences, medicine, philosophy of human movement, psychology and behavioral sciences, neurosciences, speech pathology, experimental phonetics, speech and rhetoric, and the history of science in general.
Publishing status: Available
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
xi
List of Abbreviations
xiii
Introduction
xv
1. The Problem
xv
2. Speech in Natural Philosophy and Medicine
xxxv
3. The Present Work
xliv
Chapter 1. Traditional Concepts of Speech and Speech Defect
1
1. The Word
1
2. Definitions of Voice and Speech
6
3. The Causes of Speech
12
4. Defects of Speech (Vitia Loquelae)
40
Chapter 2. Classification of Speech Defect in the Aristotelian Problems
49
1. Philosophical Origins
49
2. Is the Speech of Infants Defective?
63
3. The Problems in the Middle Ages
69
4. The Problems in the Renaissance
77
5. Conclusions
89
Chapter 3. Galenic Classification of Speech Defect and Disorder
97
1. Diseases
97
2. Symptoms
108
3. Speech Disorders: The Parts Affected
147
4. Conclusions
151
Chapter 4. “Thin” Voice or “Checked” Voice?: Galen’s Lost Theory
153
1. The Problem
153
2. Galen's Lost Theory of “Checked Voice”
168
Chapter 5. Moisture and the Tongue, Place and Manner of Articulation: The Tradition of Aphorism vi.32 up to the Renaissance
189
1. Aphorism vi.32
189
2. Classical Commentaries
191
3. The Early Middle Ages
202
4. The High and Late Middle Ages
221
Chapter 6. Moisture and the Tongue in the Renaissance
231
1. The Renaissance
231
2. Conclusions
260
Chapter 7. Speech Disorder and Melancholy in the Classical and Medieval Period
261
1. Introduction
261
2. Tradition of Aphorisms vii.40
263
3. Tradition of Epidemics ii.5 and 6
274
4. Tradition of Problems xi.38
295
5. Conclusions
305
Chapter 8. Speech Disorder and Melancholy in the Renaissance
307
1. Introduction
307
2. Tradition of Aphorisms vii.40
308
3. Epidemics ii.5 & 6 and Problems xi.38
318
4. Conclusions
341
Chapter 9. Sanctorius: Galenus contra Galenum
345
1. The Dawn of Mechanism in the Speech Sciences
345
2. Sanctorius and his ‘Methods for Avoiding All Errors”
346
3. Sanctorius on the Cause of Speech Disorder
352
4. Implications for the History of Speech Therapy
355
5. Conclusions
362
Appendix, Six Galenic Classifications of Speech Defect and Disorder, 14th–17th Centuries
365
Bibliography
1. Manuscripts
2. Printed Works
Index of Names
Index of Subjects
List of Illustrations
Figure 1. Girolamo fabrizi d' Aquapendente
31
Figure 2. The Organs of Speech (Fabricius 1601)
35
Figure 3. The Anatomy of the Tongue (Vesalius 1543)
38
Figure 4. George of Trebizond and Theodore Gaza
85
Figure 5. Peter of Abano
124
Figure 6. Girolamo Cardano
242
Figure 7. Girolamo Mercuriali
249
Figure 8. Sanctorius Sanctorius
347
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Subjects

Philosophy

Philosophy
BIC Subject: HP – Philosophy
BISAC Subject: PHI000000 – PHILOSOPHY / General
U.S. Library of Congress Control Number:  97005838